This fall’s debate in Parliament over the
Trans-Pacic Partnership (TPP) is the right
thing to do, but federal agriculture minister
Lawrence MacAulay is keen on the benets he
expects the deal to deliver.
“We have committed to an open debate in
the House of Commons and then a vote; that’s
just fair,” MacAulay told the Greater Vancouver
Board of Trade during a presentation in
September.
However, he told the crowd of business
people that he expects great benets to ow
from Canada’s pending free trade agreements
with countries on both the Pacic Rim through
the TPP as well as across the Atlantic in Europe,
where Canada has negotiated the
Comprehensive Economic and Trade
Agreement (CETA).
“It’s a great opportunity, and I expect that
things will progress quite well in that area,”
MacAulay said regarding CETA.
Negotiations on the TPP completed days
before last October’s election and devised a
formula by which dairy and poultry farmers
cede market share to imports. The agreement
fuelled high emotions in some segments of the
agricultural community, but MacAulay has a
sense that producers largely support the
arrangement.
“I’ve heard farmers and business people
right across the country – I’ve heard very little
opposition to TPP, I can tell you,” he said.
“We’re not sure just how it will all play out. …
[but] it provides a great opportunity for the
agricultural sector, and a lot of other sectors,
too.”
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Life
in BC
The agricultural news source in
British Columbia since 1915
October 2016 • Vol. 102 No. 10
Feds champion overseas trade deals
Y
COUNTRY
Stories by PETER MITHAM
VANCOUVER – Lower Mainland farmland could be
sacriced to ensure agri-food exports can move to market
quickly and eciently, federal agriculture minister
Lawrence MacAulay told Country Life in BC.
“We do not want to lose agricultural land but it’s no
good producing products that you can’t move, either,”
MacAulay said, answering a question from Country Life in
BC following a presentation to Greater Vancouver Board of
Trade members on September 12. “So it’s one way or the
other – the port in Vancouver has to be ecient to move
the products to market. The Asian market is a big market,
only going to get larger, and we want to be there.”
MacAulay was in Vancouver as part of a tour of Western
Canada that stretched from Saskatchewan grainelds to a
craft brewery on Vancouver Island.
Opportunities to boost agri-food exports gured
prominently in his West Coast itinerary, with an address to
the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade and an
endorsement of the new catalogue of export-ready agri-
food products BC has published with funding from
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Port development
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federal minister MacAulay
Please see “TRUMP” page 2
Hogging
the limelight
Monica Romeyn of
Fraser Valley Beef
and Swine sold her
2016 grand
champion market
hog project to
Georey and
Catherine Kieft at
the annual PNE 4-H
action for $5.25 a
pound, well above
the $4.10 average.
Do the math and at
275 lbs, that’s a
$1443.75 return on
investment! An
institution in BC
agriculture since
1910, this year’s fair
hosted some 450 4-H
members from
across BC and the
4-H action grossed
a whopping
$299,652.52.
(Photo courtesy of
the PNE)
Growing Forward 2.
But the thrust of his remarks focused on
Vancouver’s port facilities and the launch pad
those provide for Asia-bound products.
“We have to make sure that they can handle
the products as fast as they possibly can and as
eciently as they possibly can,” he said.
MacAulay’s comments won’t sit well with
municipalities such as Richmond or local
farmland advocates who have challenged the
Port of Vancouver’s plans to tap local farmland
for port-related uses.
Yet the port, as a federal entity, holds the
trump card: while it has pledged to le
exclusion applications to remove protected
farmland from the province’s Agricultural Land
Reserve, it’s under no obligation to do so as an
arm of the senior level of government.
“I don’t think we would be bound [by the
Agricultural Land Commission],” Robin
Silvester, president and CEO of the port
authority, said earlier this year. “We have
supremacy.”
Site Economics Ltd. prepared a report for
the port authority in October 2015 that
estimates port activities will require
approximately 2,700 acres by 2030. The
demand could cost Delta alone 1,500 acres of
productive farmland, according to the Delta
Farmers’ Institute.
Agriculture is almost meaningless”
Silvester believes local agriculture is “almost
meaningless” when it comes to local food
security but that stance is at odds with
MacAulay’s message to the Greater Vancouver
Board of Trade.
Responding to a question from the audience
regarding organic production, MacAulay said
his job is to ensure farmers in Canada are
capturing local markets before venturing into
exports.
“There are products that we aren’t
producing enough of, and I want to help you
produce those products so that you receive the
benet,” he told his audience, which included
very few farmers. “My responsibility is to help
you, and I want to do it.”
TRUMP CARD From page 1
Country Life in BC • October 20162
New catalogue highlights export-ready products
by PETER MITHAM
VANCOUVER – With the
province’s agri-food exports
surging, BC agriculture
minister Norm Letnick
unveiled a glossy new
catalogue of export-ready
agri-food products on the
Vancouver waterfront on
September 12.
Accompanied by federal
agriculture minister
Lawrence MacAulay, Letnick
said the publication aims to
familiarize overseas buyers
with the range of BC
products available to them.
The genesis of the project,
which Letnick described as a
“labour of love,” was his
inability during a trade
mission in 2014 to name
more than a couple of
products buyers in China
could order then and there
for local markets.
China No. 2
China (including Hong
Kong) is the second-biggest
importer of BC agri-food
products after the US,
importing $406 million
worth of products in 2015.
Letnick said the catalogue
will help expand the
province’s exports to China
as well as countries around
the Pacific Rim, including
South Korea, India and
elsewhere.
BC exported $3.5 billion
worth of agricultural
products to 150 countries in
2015, a 23% increase over
2014.
The growth of agri-food
exports has been a bright
spot in BC’s international
trade portfolio, outpacing
traditionally strong sectors
such as forestry and mining.
Over 600 products
Of the more than 600
products Letnick said are
available for export, the top
five are farmed salmon ($411
million), food for processing
($294 million), blueberries
($218 million), baked goods
($159 million) and
mushrooms ($131 million).
The other $2.3 billion
worth of exports includes a
range of processed
products, which represent
the majority of offerings in
the catalogue.
Just 16 of the nearly 100
companies featured in the
catalogue are primary
producers of meat, fruit and
vegetables. Letnick couldn’t
pin a value to the
contribution export markets
make to farm gate receipts,
which approached $3.1
billion last year.
However, Letnick said
growing agri-food sales at
home and abroad are
putting more money into
farmers’ pockets.
The province’s agriculture
sector enjoyed a net cash
income last year of $440
million and even income
after depreciation, was
positive at $65.3 million
after nine years of red ink.
BC Minister of
Agriculture Norm
Letnick, far left,
and federal
Minister of
Agriculture and
Agri-Food
Lawrence
MacAulay used
the Vancouver
waterfront
backdrop at
Canada Place to
launch the
provincial
ministry’s new
catalogue of
export-ready
agri-food products
last month.
(Photo courtesy of
BCMA)
BC agri-food export growth
has outpaced forestry and mining
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 3
US herd expansion delivers skidding cattle markets
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VERNON Cattle prices
have seen “quite the
correction” in 2016, Gateway
Livestock cattle market analyst
Anne Wasko told the BC
Association of Cattle Feeders
(BCACF) annual meeting in
Vernon, September 9, warning
the small group of feedlot
operators her presentation “is
not going to be good news.”
She noted the Alberta price
for fed cattle was just $134.00
per cwt during the last week of
August, a 25% drop from the
year previous. And the news
went downhill from there. The
price of feeder steers has
dropped 35%, 600-pound
steers dropped 40% and cows
dropped 30% from a year
earlier. Wholesale prices are
also dropping, but not as
much as cattle prices, with the
wholesale price of AAA
cutouts down 18% from a year
earlier. Retail prices, however,
have yet to reect the lower
producer and wholesale
prices. As a result, packer and
retailer margins are increasing
while those for producers are
decreasing.
Wasko says expansion in
the US is solely to blame.
“The US cow inventory is up
by two million cows this year,”
she said. “So much has come
on so much quicker than
anyone expected.”
Given that the entire
Canadian beef herd numbers
less than four million cows,
that’s a huge increase for the
market to swallow. Although
the overall Canadian cow
inventory hasn’t changed
much in the past year, BC is
bucking the trend. BC’s
inventory is up 4% this year
and now numbers over
200,000 cows, the largest total
since 2010.
Despite that, Canadian
production continues to
increase, due largely to ever-
increasing carcass weights.
Production is up 9% from both
fed and non-fed cattle.
“We are running at record
carcass weights after last year’s
record carcass weights,” Wasko
said. “More animals and larger
animals equals more product.”
That is putting a strain on
processor capacity.
Exacerbating that is a lack of
workers, particularly in this
province. BC Abattoirs
Association (BCAA) executive
director Nova Woodbury says
BC’s 65 provincially-licenced
abattoirs are short about 250
workers. The BCAA is starting a
10-week no-cost training
program for new workers in
Kamloops in October, but it
will not make much of a dent
as it will only train 10 people
per session.
“We will have a second
program in March and hope to
roll it out across the province
in the future,” Woodbury said.
Feedlots also have a worker
shortage, BCACF president
August Bremer said, noting
the Seasonal Agricultural
Workers Program “doesn’t
work for us since we feed year-
round.”
Wasko does not expect a
turnaround anytime soon.
Just the opposite. She
expects US beef production
to increase 5% this year,
another 4% next year and hit
an all-time high in 2018. With
more domestic beef available
in the US, there has been less
demand for Canadian cattle,
resulting in a 40% decrease
in exports of Canadian feeder
cattle to the US.
All this leads her to predict
even lower prices next year.
“The present market suggests
a 35% decrease in feeder
cattle prices.”
One factor driving the US
production increase is the big
grain crops.
“The US is projecting a
record 15 billion bushel corn
crop this year,” Wasko
reported, saying low US grain
prices mean Western Canada
no longer has the cheapest
feed cost to gain ratio.
A glut in production makes
the Veried Beef Program
more important than ever,
says BC VBP program
co-ordinator Annette Moore.
VBP began as an on-farm food
safety program in 2005 and
has just been expanded into
the VBP+ program to include
new animal care, health of
animals (biosecurity) and
environmental stewardship
components to meet
consumer and buyer concerns
in those areas.
“Restaurants are making
claims and want the
assurances we are living up to
those claims,” Moore says.
She accuses producers of
having a case of “head-in-the-
sand-itis. The Canadian
Cattlemen Association says we
have it but we don’t have
enough people on it.”
That is
because,
unlike
similar
programs
in the
supply-
managed
sector, the
program
remains
voluntary.
Even though 1,000 BC
people, representing about
750 operations, have been
trained in the VBP program,
only 123 BC operations have
actually joined. Only 77 are
currently active and another
16 are waiting for audits,
Moore reported.
Although it costs $100,000
per year to run the program in
BC, the training is provided
free of charge and the cost to
join the program is still only
$100 per year. However, that
could change as government
funding is set to end in two
years.
“We have had 13 years of
funding,” Moore notes.
The lack of participation is
causing some buyers to
consider implementing their
own programs, which could
come at a greater cost and
force greater requirements on
producers. Fortunately, Moore
says, major buyers are working
with the Canadian Roundtable
for Sustainable Beef to
develop an “enabling
framework to verify the good
you’re already doing.” She
notes McDonald’s has been
sponsoring a veried
sustainable beef pilot project
for the past three years. Based
on the VBP+ requirements, the
project has already conducted
183 on-site verications in
Western Canada.
Moore stresses VBP+ is “not
about premiums,” rather it’s
about providing assurance to
the public. She urges
producers to learn about the
program, take the training, do
the record-keeping (including
implementing any required
practices they are not already
doing), then register for and
maintain the program.
“If you want the program to
go across Canada, you have to
join it.”
Anne Wasko
Annette Moore
“We are running at record carcass weights
after last yearʼs record carcass weights. More
animals and larger animals equal more product.”
Gateway Livestock cattle market analyst Anne Wasko
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Growth south of the border has resulted in a 40% decrease in exports of Canadian feeder cattle to the United States
Editor & Publisher Peter Wilding
Phone: 604/871-0001 • Fax: 604/871-0003
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Country Life in BC • October 20164
Most farmers know you need land
to produce food you can export.
But during his recent visit to
Vancouver, federal agriculture minister
Lawrence MacAulay seemed so keen
on overseas trade opportunities that
the fact fell o his radar.
Questioned by Country Life in BC
during a media scrum after addressing
the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade
last month, he made clear that
Canada’s farmers need access to
foreign markets for their products.
While declaring his tour of
Vancouver port facilities “some
interesting,” the PEI Member of
Parliament didn’t appear to have been
briefed on the port’s designs on
hundreds of acres of local farmland. He
wasn’t aware of how much agricultural
land might be at risk even as the port
has estimated its requirements over
the next decade at 2,700 acres. “We do
not want to lose agricultural land, but
it’s no good producing products that
you can’t move, either. So it’s one way
or the other,” he said.
While he told board of trade
members he was all for Canada’s food
security, the idea that the potatoes,
berries and greenhouse vegetables
grown in BC might nd a home in local
markets wasn’t part of the day’s
message.
Combined with Ottawa’s
endorsement of the Site C power
project, which will create an 83-
kilometre-long reservoir and submerge
thousands of acres of farmland, and its
support of the Trans-Pacic
Partnership, developing international
markets is fundamental to the sunny
ways Prime Minister Trudeau promises
– clouding its ostensible support for
local growers.
One of the hurdles the Liberals
faced while campaigning a year ago
was the widespread perception of the
party being the voice of an urban elite
that shops at farmers markets but
would most likely squeal like a pig if it
stepped in some stray nutrients (to use
the polite term from Environmental
Farm Plans).
Trudeau Jr has regained for Canada
a large measure of the international
goodwill lost during the Harper years.
But the impromptu photos that
bring new meaning to his father’s quip,
“just watch me,” seldom take place in
farmyards. Producers hoping to catch
him in BC would need to look no
further than up the Grouse Grind,
surng in Tono or performing a two-
step for the crowds in a parade.
The challenges of getting Prairie
Just watch him
The dangers of being distracted in a connnected world
grain to port have been acute in recent
years, but the cost of getting wheat to
water shouldn’t be the loss of BC
farms.
BC farmers face enough challenges
without the federal agriculture minister
telling them they’ve got to suck up yet
another development for their own
good. That runs counter to his pledge
to support local opportunities for local
farmers, and jeopardizes the $3.5
billion worth of BC agri-food exports
MacAualy says he wants to increase.
A year into his term, Trudeau hasn’t
faced the challenges that made his
father one of the country’s most
colourful prime ministers. The photo
ops haven’t included a pirouette or the
so-called Salmon Arm salute to jobless
protestors, or anything that could be
mistaken for “fuddle duddle.”
With ministers like MacAulay telling
BC farmers that overseas markets
come rst, he doesn’t have to.
On June 1, the Motor Vehicle Act was amended to
increase the penalties for the use of a hand held
electronic device while operating a motor vehicle.
The ne for a distracted driving violation ticket is
now $368, four driver’s license penalty points and a
$175 ICBC Driver’s Penalty Point Premium. That’s a
total of $543 for a rst infraction. A second infraction
within a year will add up to another $886.
These are hefty nes but the really scary numbers
are out there on the roads and highways: 20% of BC
drivers admit to using hand held electronic devices
while driving; the visual awareness of a driver using
a cell phone decreases by 50%, and 27% of all BC car
crash fatalities involve distracted driving.
Summer of 1967
Distracted driving isn’t new and it is not the
exclusive domain of drivers on cell phones. It used
to be referred to as undue care and attention. I
remember seeing a classic example of it on West
Fourth Avenue in Vancouver in the summer of 1967
when a young man gazing sidelong at an especially
attractive pedestrian drove his Impala into the rear
end of a Mercury waiting to make a left turn.
Fortunately, it all unfolded in slow motion and there
were no serious injuries.
There will always be a certain number of
daydreamers behind the wheel, absorbed in their
thoughts and not paying proper attention to what
they are doing, but it is hard to imagine that their
numbers would come anywhere close to the 20% of
drivers who admit to using electronic devices while
they are driving. Some even profess to be good at it.
Kind of like the intoxicated driver who believes that
the alcohol in their system actually makes them
more competent.
Of added concern is the total number of all
drivers who have some sort of active device with
them and are literally accidents waiting to happen.
Cell phones and tablets are now ubiquitous. It is
nearly impossible to be in any public space without
being surrounded by people absorbed with a hand
held something-or-other. Even if they’re not actively
using, few seem able to resist the beep or chime
that might announce another tweet from a
millionaire sports celebrity or someone who liked
their Facebook photo of yesterday’s lunch.
To be fair, it’s not all so mundane. There are
endless examples of the business and professional
benets of the wireless world, but you have to
wonder at what point all of that connectedness
crosses the line from practical to pointless. In the
case of distracted drivers, it goes beyond pointless
to outright dangerous.
The list is endless
Wireless distraction isn’t a phenomenon restricted
to time spent behind the wheel of an automobile. It
is a condition that can aect any human activity.
Distracted pedestrians, distracted parents, distracted
students, distracted employees – the list is endless.
Increasingly, people are leading distracted lives.
Today’s children have been born into a wireless
world and few of them will escape a distracted
childhood. As memorable as the distracted driver I
saw in Vancouver in 1967 are the six and seven year
olds I witnessed this summer taking seles of
themselves on a playground slide. It seemed much
too serious to count as play in the traditional sense
of the word. There were no delighted squeals and
the rush to climb back up and go again was
replaced by silent examination of the content just
created: the unbridled exuberance of playing on the
slide replaced by the distraction of an image of
themselves taking a picture of themselves sitting on
the slide. Shared onto the internet, those images
become a distraction for others.
As our world becomes increasingly wireless and
connected, the same peril faces us all: the more
connected, the more distracted. Eventually you
cross the line from being distracted to being A
distraction. For the kid’s sakes, we really should be
aiming higher.
The Back 40
BOB COLLINS
Time and tide
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 5
observations on rural life, Bob
has entertained readers for
years with his Woodshed
Chronicles. At the same time,
his monthly page four Back 40
column has raised the level of
discourse with his valuable
insights on farming.
The current nucleus of
writers consisting of Ronda
Payne, Tom Walker, Tamara
Leigh and Peter Mitham need
to be recognized.
Special mention must also
be made here for Peter
Mitham. He began writing for
this paper over a decade ago
and with his quiet reliability,
has provided us with solid
reporting and understanding
of agriculture issues.
And not to forget Lisa Bealle
who toiled behind the
scences, making sure all the
subscription info was kept up
to date Thank you.
Now for the important news
and a big thank you: Cathy
Glover will be taking over the
reins eective with the
November edition. She has
contributed to Country Life in
BC for over 20 years, working
in sales, marketing and
editorial. Her network of
relationships within the
agricultural sector in this
province has allowed us to
thrive and shine. Her expertise
and determination will bring
renewed energy. More than
ever, BC agriculture needs an
independent and trustworthy
news publication. There is no
question that Cathy will carry
on Country Life in BC’s proud
tradition. I leave this paper in
capable, skilled and trusty
hands.
Which brings me to David
Schmidt. After more than 30
years with the paper, his name
has become synonymous with
the Country Life in BC brand. I
have jested with him for years
that he has forgotten more
about agriculture than I could
ever know. But it is no joke.
Considered the dean of BC
farm writers, his shrewd issue
analysis and ability to get to
the core of the story is second
to none. For decades his
reporting has assured the
validity of this publication.
Last, but certainly not least,
I thank my wife, Linda, without
whom none of this could have
been possible. Her thoughtful
suggestions, creativity and
uninching support have
made this journey as
compelling as the desintation.
-30-
From the days when I rst
cut my teeth in the publishing
business while working on my
high school newspaper back
in the 1960s, we were told by
our sta supervisor to put the
notation “-30-” at the end of a
story. Nobody really cared very
much as to the why and
wherefore; we were all too
young and excited to be
working on a newspaper to
give a hoot.
Jump to the present, and
one day while proofreading a
few months ago, the -30-
seemed to jump o the page
at me, so I nally decided to
determine the origin of that
notation that had been part of
my life for almost a half
century. About time.
According to Webster’s
New World Dictionary of
Media and Communications,
“the symbol may have come
from the use by telegraphers
of three X’s, also the Roman
numeral for 30, to signify the
end of a dispatch. The rst
press dispatches from
American Civil War battleelds
ended with -30-, by then the
standard signo. The symbol
also may have stood for the
amount of time during which
reporters were allowed to use
the military-controlled
telegraph lines during the Civil
War. The “30” at the end of the
dispatch told telegraphers at
the receiving end that the
dispatch was completed and
that time was up.”
Indeed, now my time at
Country Life in BC is up, too.
Time and tide have taken
their toll, and the time is right
for me (and for Country Life In
BC) to make a graceful exit
from this 102 year-old
publication.
However, it’s not easy
to walk away from
something that you
really love.
When I rst answered
an ad and was hired on
at this paper in 1996, it
was, bluntly, a job nothing
more. But then, after months
and years of immersion in the
business of farm media, the
more I read, the more
interesting it became. After
living in the city my whole life,
who knew such a vast farm
press existed
a new world of
agricultural information,
politics, innovation and history?
Naturally, when the
opportunity arose in early
2000 to take over the helm of
the paper from ailing
publisher Malcolm Young, it
was a no-brainer – damn the
torpedoes, full speed ahead!
At that juncture in time,
(without trying to be overly
dramatic), this paper was on
the precipice, in danger of
dying an ignoble death. I
believed this newspaper didn’t
warrant going out with a
whimper – that this
publication deserved to be
revitalized and become even
more relevant to the farming
community. Readership faith
had been rattled and
advertisers were quietly
seeking greener pastures.
So, by rolling up my sleeves
(and rolling out the
chequebook), I embarked on a
very remarkable adventure.
The survival of the paper
was rather dicey at rst, but it
weathered the storm, thanks
in large part to the
contributions of David
Schmidt and Cathy Glover.
The bottom line is that the
reader must have a strong
reason to be drawn to a
newspaper. Therefore,
credibility is crucial. In turn,
this condence convinces
advertisers to speak to their
customers through the paper;
a self-perpetuating cycle.
Therefore, I thank you, the
loyal readers and the hundreds
of advertisers, who allowed
Country Life in BC into their
homes to inform, raise
challenging questions, provide
insights and at times, entertain.
To achieve this, there have
been many talented people
who have graced these pages,
far too many to be mentioned
in this space.
However, I would like to
express my thanks to our
current core crop of writers,
contributors and columnists. I
will start with the latter: Laura
Rance, Liz Twan, Linda
Wegner, Jo Sleigh, Judie
Steeves, Margaret Evans and
Bob Collins.
Special mention must be
made for Bob. He came to the
publication around 20 years
ago and is still going strong.
With his sly, Mark Twain-like
The Final Word
PETER WILDING
156 acre dairy farm. 100'x170' drive-thru freestall barn with 120 stalls. 2x4 herringbone
milk parlor. Several good outbuildings incl calf/heifer housing, newer twin bay
44'x120'x10'H covered concrete bunker silo plus hay storage. Approx 150 acres
cultivated; most irrigated. Very picturesque farm w/older home & mobile. Minutes from
Armstrong. Adjoining 160 acre farm for sale as well. MLS® 10100266, $2,900,000
www.oklandbuyers.com
www.OkLandBuyers.ca
Downtown Realty
4007 - 32nd Street, Vernon, BC V1T 5P2
Toll Free: 1-800-434-9122
www.royallegpage.ca
PAT DUGGAN
Farm | Ranch | Residential
Bus: 250/545-5371 (24 hr)
Cell: 250/308-0938
email: patduggan@royallepage.ca
“Farmers helping farmers with their real estate needs”
1095 DEEP CREEK ROAD, ENDERBY
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Tractor safety training
for all farmers in BC, at no cost!
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y
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Call: 1.877.533.1789
Contact@AgSafeBC.ca
TRAINING CO-SPONSORED BY
COUNTRY
The agricultural news source in
British Columbia since 1915
Life
in BC
When Peter Wilding bought Country Life in BC in 2000, it was struggling. But with Peter’s leadership, an institution in
BC agriculture has flourished. While it’s hard to imagine the paper without Peter’s touch, I am honoured and genuinely
excited to be Country Life in BC’s new publisher. Together with our core group of writers, we pledge to continue keeping you
informed on what (and who) is making news in BC agriculture and we’re looking forward to growing our reach beyond print
to ensure Country Life in BC remains the leading source of agricultural news in British Columbia for years to come.
Congratulations, Peter (and the Mrs.), on your retirement. You’ve left pretty big boots to fill!
Cathy Glover
Country Life in BC
publisher@countrylifeinbc.com
SWEET IRON PHOTOGRAPHY
New beginnings
New beginnings
Country Life in BC • October 20166
by DAVID SCHMIDT
DELTA – The BC potato
variety trial keeps getting
more popular every year. Over
170 people registered for this
year’s eld day, held at
Reynalda Farms in Delta,
August 24.
In addition to dozens of
local growers, packers,
wholesalers and retailers, this
year’s eld day attracted
visitors from Europe, Prince
Edward Island, New Brunswick,
Saskatchewan, Alberta and
Washington. Visitors got to
compare over 100 potato
varieties, including named and
numbered varieties sourced
from Agriculture and Agri-
Food Canada’s potato
breeding program and seed
suppliers across Canada.
There is good reason for the
interest, says BC Potato &
Vegetable Growers Association
president Bill Zylmans.
“This is the only trial where
potatoes are grown under
commercial conditions,” he
points out.
Each year, one local grower
oers up a small section of his
potato acreage for the trial.
Trial co-ordinator Heather
Meberg of ES Cropconsult
plants the trial varieties in the
eld, then asks the grower to
treat them exactly the same as
the rest of the eld. In this
year’s case, that meant
planting them in a eld which
had chicken manure applied
the previous fall and
commercial fertilizer added in
the spring. No irrigation was
used during the growing
Annual potato variety trial
takes on international flavour
“Ideal year” has Delta farmers expecting near-record levels
season.
By the eld day, the plants
had been growing for 104
days. For the eld day, 10
plants of each variety were
dug up and the resulting
potatoes piled in the eld,
giving visitors a chance to
compare yields, shape and
other characteristics.
Replicated trials
About 40 varieties were
grown as demonstrations, but
the rest were grown in
replicated trials allowing
Meberg to generate results
data, and give the potatoes to
local teaching kitchens for
students to assess each
variety’s taste and cooking or
baking characteristics.
Hugh Reynolds of Reynalda
Farms says shape and colour
are the most important
attributes, noting people in
the store choose potatoes
“because of what they look
like. They want a brown russet,
a red potato that’s red and not
pink and a yellow potato that
has a truly yellow esh.
Hugh Reynolds
of Reynalda
Farms
discusses
potato
genetics with
visitors to the
BC potato
variety trials
eld day at his
farm in Delta,
August 24.
(David
Schmidt
photos)
Please see “IMOLA” page 7
The annual BC potato variety trials eld day at Reynalda Farms in
Delta was a popular event, attracting growers and other industry
reps from across Canada and the northwestern US.
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“For some yellow varieties,
the best you can say is that
they are ‘not white’,” he states.
Reynolds has been growing
potatoes for close to half a
century and has changed his
varieties over the years in
response to changing
consumer preferences and
improved varieties.
“I used to grow Norchip
white potatoes but had to
change after Weston wanted
long white instead of round
white potatoes,” he says by
way of example.
Although Reynalda
currently grows about 60 acres
of Alta Cross white, Chieftain
red and Satina yellow
potatoes, that will change as
the farm plans to switch its
yellow variety to Imola.
Reynolds believes Imola, one
of the newer varieties in the
trial, oers a more consistent
shape, colour and yield and
could command a better price
in the market. He is also
considering Teton as a new
russet variety.
Rotation crops needed
It is not just the potatoes
which are changing. Since
potatoes can only be grown in
a eld once every three years,
growers need rotation crops
for the other two years. In the
distant past, Reynalda grew
seed crops but had to stop
after the nearby Reifel bird
sanctuary was established.
“The birds would come and
eat the seeds so we couldn’t
grow them anymore,”
Reynolds explains.
This year, his rotational
crops included 60 acres of
peas and 75 acres of beans.
Peas and beans have been
popular rotational crops for
Delta growers in the past but
that has changed as Lucerne
Foods decided to stop buying
them after being purchased by
Nature Fresh.
“Lucerne went from buying
1,000 acres of peas last year to
buying just 100 acres of
organic peas this year,”
Reynolds notes.
He hopes the only
remaining processor, BC
Frozen, will take his peas and
beans this year but notes they
only have the capacity to
process 15 acres per day which
could leave some growers
without a market this year.
Hopefully, that will be oset
by better returns from the
potatoes, as this is shaping up
to be a banner year.
Cull rate down
“It’s been an old-fashioned
summer. We got an early start,
had lots of heat early and the
rains came at the right time,”
Zylmans says. “I don’t see
anyone feeling negative. Our
cull rate will be down and
IMOLA UNDER CONSIDERATION From page 6
quality will be up.”
Reynolds is equally
optimistic.
“I expect the price to be
fair,” he says, noting Europe
had “terrible growing
conditions” and poor weather
conditions in much of the rest
of Canada and the US could
reduce their yields by 5%. As a
result, “we won’t be ooded
by US potatoes.”
In contrast, yields in Delta
are expected to reach near-
record levels.
“This has been an ideal
year,” says Investment
Agriculture Foundation chair
Ken Bates, who operates
Tecarte Farms with his two
brothers.
“We expect to get 30
tonnes per acre from our
Kennebecs,” he says, noting a
normal yield is 18-25 tonnes
per acre.
That’s a lotta bull! A bull owned by Copper T Ranch of Fraser Lake, Tlell Bennett ET 3B, took
supreme champion at the 50th anniversary Beef Show at the Nechako Valley Exhibition in
August. 104 head of cattle were exhibited, including eight entries for the commercial pen of three
heifers class won by Luke Meuhlen of Vanderhoof. The fair also hosted a Hereford, Angus and All
Other Breeds show. (Photo courtesy of Lois Crosby)
Country Life in BC • October 20168
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they continue to have the
same 16 directors, the two
organizations were split earlier
this year.
“It used to all be under
Canada Beef but that was not
acceptable to Farm Products
Council of Canada,” Allison
explains.
Now the agency has its own
general manager, Melinda
German, and is responsible for
ensuring use of the national
checko funds complies with
the federal acts and the
direction of each province.
“Melinda is now working to
ensure service agreements are
in place with each province,”
Allison says.
That is key since each
province species how much
of their levy goes toward
marketing and how much to
research. BC has been
allocating 90¢ to marketing
and 10¢ to research but that
could change with the higher
levy.
“We will discuss the ratio at
our fall CIDC meeting,” Allison
says.
Promotion and marketing
dollars are funneled into
Canada Beef while research
funds are distributed by the
Beef Cattle Research Council
(BCRC).
Because all beef-producing
provinces approved the $1
national levy, the agency
could also apply it to imported
beef, bringing an additional $1
million into the coers.
However, Ontario and Quebec
have yet to approve the
higher levy. Until they do,
there will be no increase in the
levy on imported product,
even if BC and other provinces
start paying the higher rate.
Allison says the increased
levy is necessary to implement
the national beef strategy
adopted in 2015. The strategy
has four goals:
• Connectivity – increase
synergies within industry and
make positive connections
with consumers and
government.
• Productivity – increase
production eciency by 15%
by 2020.
• Competitiveness – reduce
cost disadvantages by 7% by
2020.
• Beef demand – increase
carcass cutout value by 15%
by 2020.
By leveraging their funds,
Canada Beef and the BCRC are
able to get a $14 value out of
each checko dollar.
Allison says Canada Beef
has developed a Canadian
brand and is focused on
promoting the brand both
inside and outside Canada.
“Food service, packers and
retailers have really embraced
the brand,” she says, adding
restaurants like Tim Horton’s
and McDonald’s are now also
asking to use it. “We haven’t
had that before.”
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 9
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VERNON BC Cattlemen’s
Association water sub-
committee chair Linda Allison
says she was “embarrassed”
by the well-licensing seminar
at this spring’s BCCA annual
meeting. Intended to help
ranchers with the licensing
requirements of the new
Water Stewardship Act, the
seminar instead made the
process appear even more
dicult than it is.
Rather than stew about it,
Allison, who has represented
ranching interests during the
development of the act for
the past 10 years, did
something about it.
“I went home and went
through the process of
registering my own wells,”
she says. Her experience led
her to condense the 82-page
help document provided at
the seminar into a much more
user-friendly eight-page
guide titled Helpful Hints when
apply for an existing
groundwater (well) licence.
“The guide goes through
what you actually need and
doesn’t include things you
don’t need to do,” she told BC
cattle feeders at their annual
meeting in Vernon,
September 9.
Allison’s guide opens with
a one and a half page listing
of the documents and
information a registrant will
require, detailing where and
how to obtain them.
Step-by-step instructions
It describes how to access
the water licensing website,
includes likely responses to
many of the questions being
asked and provides concise
step-by-step instructions on
how to provide requested
information and use the
available tools. At the
conclusion of each step,
Allison includes a reminder to
“save your application.”
Saving regularly can avoid a
lot of potential frustration
later, she points out.
Regardless of when an
existing well is registered, the
government is charging for its
water usage from March 16,
2016. Delaying registration is
therefore not advisable as it
will only result in a larger
initial usage bill. Besides, the
free well registration period
will expire March 1, 2017.
The guide is available
through the BCCA oce
[www.cattlemen.bc.ca] or
1-877-888-2333. As well, the
New guide simplifies well licensing
BCCA will be holding
workshops throughout the
province this fall and winter
to assist producers.
Although the government
has nalized the licensing,
rates and many other
components of the new act,
some issues remain. Of
primary concern to the cattle
sector are issues surrounding
stock watering on private and
public land.
“The Ministry of
Environment is now
developing an intentions
paper and once it is released,
we will have a comment
period,” Allison said.
Check-off fee increase will boost BC, nat’l beef programs
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VERNON – An increase in
the BC beef checko from $3
to $5 per head can go ahead
after the BC Association of
Cattle Feeders approved it at
their annual meeting in
Vernon, September 9.
The increase includes a 50¢
increase in the provincial
checko (from $2 to $2.50)
and a $1.50 increase in the
national checko (from $1 to
$2.50).
The others three members
of the BC Cattle Industry
Development Council (CIDC) –
the BC Cattlemen’s
Association, BC Breeders and
Feeders Association and BC
Dairy Association – all
previously approved the
increase.
Since the BC Cattle Industry
Development Fund matches
the checko, the $5 levy will
make $10 available for
provincial and national beef
promotion, marketing and
research programs.
The national portion of the
checko is mandatory but the
provincial portion is
refundable. Despite that, less
than 1% of sellers ask for a
refund and CIDC chair Linda
Allison, a Princeton rancher,
does not expect that to
change with the levy increase.
The CIDC must now send
the provincial government a
letter conrming approval of
the new rate by all parties. This
will allow government to
change the legislation
enabling the increase. Allison
hopes that occurs before the
end of the year so the new
levy can be in place by next
spring.
In addition to chairing CIDC,
Allison has just been elected
chair of Canada Beef and the
Canadian Beef Cattle Research,
Market Development and
Promotion Agency. Although
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Country Life in BC • October 201610
Increasing interest
in low heat unit corn
by DAVID SCHMIDT
MATSQUI
When assessing
how good a corn variety is,
measure the tonnes of dry
matter it produces. That is the
key number, Alexis Arthur told
growers attending the corn
trials eld day at Rose Gate
Farms in Matsqui, September
14.
She said well-timed rain has
resulted in a better corn crop
than last year.
“I expect higher tonnage
and feed value this year,”
Arthur says.
One dairyman who grew
hundreds of acres of corn
conrmed that. While cobs are
smaller, the overall crop is
much better.
“Last year, our yields were
about seven tonnes per acre
below normal. This year, we
are getting about three
tonnes per acre more than
normal. That’s a 10 tonne per
acre turnaround in one year,”
he said.
The trials eld day was one
of four Pacic Ag Bag hosted,
with others held on Sumas
Prairie, Vancouver Island and
Enderby. The Matsqui plot
included over a dozen
commercial varieties from
Pride Seeds and Thunder
Seeds and at least that many
experimental varieties.
Short supply
Arthur admits not all
growers got the seed they
wanted this year as some of
the Pride varieties were in
short supply but says she is
working with Pride to ensure
that does not happen again
next year.
Although many of the
experimental varieties looked
good, as all forage corn did
this year, Arthur said they
would likely result in only one
or two new varieties being
released. While most
commercial varieties have
been genetically modied to
make them Round-Up Ready
and many are also resistant to
corn borer and armyworms,
experimental varieties do not
have those added genes.
Arthur notes there is no point
adding those traits until a
company is condent the
variety is worth releasing.
Don’t spend the extra $
Although just about all but
organic growers use RoundUp
Ready forage corn seed,
Arthur advised growers not to
spend the extra money for
multi-trait seeds since corn
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borer, armyworms and similar
pests are not issues in BC.
Since weather is becoming
more and more unpredictable,
Arthur says breeders are
putting more eort into
getting more out of low heat
unit corn. She says Thunder
has been quite successful in
developing good low heat
unit corn, pointing to
TH4126RR as an example. It
requires only 2250 heat units
yet looked almost as tall with
cobs similar to varieties
requiring many more heat
units.
TH4578RR, rated at just
2200 heat units, is another
popular variety in BC. Arthur
notes it oers good spring
vigour and its cobs ll out to
the end. As a result, many
Manitoba growers are even
using it as a grain corn.
This was not a year growers
needed a low heat unit corn
but many recent years have
been.
To ensure they always get a
crop, Arthur advises growers
to hedge their bets by
planting a mix of both low
and higher heat unit varieties.
She also encourages them to
trial dierent varieties in their
own elds before making
large purchases. What may
look good in a trial may not
work as well in a grower’s
specic situation.
Alexis Arthur of Pacic Ag Bag describes corn varieties from Thunder Seed and Pride Seed during the
corn eld day at Rose Gate Farms in Abbotsford, September 14. (David Schmidt photo)
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 11
PNE auction nets near record proceeds for ag
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VANCOUVER Normally held in the
picturesque environs of the Momiji
Gardens, inclement weather forced the
Pacic National Exhibition to move its
annual Evening for Agriculture indoors,
September 1.
The rain outside did not dampen the
enthusiasm of over 100 guests
assembled inside the Pacic Room of
the Pacic Coliseum. Furious bidding
resulted in proceeds of over $20,000 for
the live auction conducted by Delta
auctioneer Ian Paton, a member of the
PNE Agricultural Advisory Committee.
Add almost $13,000 more from the
silent auction and the sale of
potentially prize-winning toy farm
animals and the total raised reached a
near-record level of more than $34,000.
“Staggering support
PNE agriculture manager Christie
Kerr said the evening received
a “staggering amount” of
support from sponsors,
noting the 15 packages in the
live auction and 45 items in
the silent auction were the
most they have ever oered.
The BC Youth in Agriculture
Foundation receives the
money, using it to provide
scholarships for BC youth
pursuing agricultural
education and grants for
agricultural-related youth
programs.
This year, such perennial
grant recipients as the BC 4-H
Ambassador Program and the
Agriculture in the Classroom
Foundation were joined by
several new recipients. Most
prominent was the Fair Roots
Mini-School.
Set to begin this school
year, the mini-school is a
partnership between the
Delta School District and
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University and supported by
local farmers and agricultural
industry members, including
Paton, Emma Lea Farms,
Westcoast Seeds and the
Delta Farmland and Wildlife
Trust.
30 students
The program is a regular
course elective that will see
up to 30 students grow crops
on an eight acre site at the
former Boundary Bay school
site. The students will visit the
site twice a week to plan,
plant, nurture and eventually
harvest the crops.
“Many of our students have
no idea what it takes to
produce their food and this
program will take them out of
the classroom and give them
some hands-on experience,”
explains Delta School District
principal Brooke Moore, who
was on hand at the auction to
accept a $10,000 donation
from the BCYIAF.
BC Youth in
Agriculture
Foundation
chair Bob
Brandsma,
left, and
treasurer
Roger Gill,
right, present
a cheque for
$9,000 to
Brooke Moore
to support the
Delta School
District’s new
Fair Roots
Mini-School.
(David
Schmidt
photo)
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 13
Small farmers resilient in the face of penny-pinching
Investment Ag releases impact assessment
by PETER MITHAM
VANCOUVER
Thanksgiving is a time when
we’re supposed to be grateful
for the abundance of food
from local farms and the fact
that no one needs to go
hungry in Canada.
But hand-in-hand with the
love for all foods local has
been rising awareness of the
cost of food and the fact that if
we put our money – and not
just food – where our mouth
is, the household grocery bill is
chewing up a lot more than it
used to.
According to the University
of Guelph’s Food Institute, the
average household saw its
grocery bills increase 4.1% in
2015, and a further increase of
2% to 4% is expected this year.
The university published a
report this summer suggesting
that consumers were cutting
back on purchases of fresh
produce to combat the price
hikes.
Statistics Canada, however,
reports a more modest
increase of just 3% between
2010 and 2014. Prices in BC –
where a Kwantlen Polytechnic
University report for Vancity
pointed to the potential for
increases of 25% to 50% in the
cost of imported produce by
2021 – households actually
spent 7.1% less over the same
period.
Put in real numbers, that
works out to $110.21 per
household each week, or $44 a
person.
Average spending
With a budget like that,
chances are the average
person isn’t making a habit of
shopping at the local farmer’s
market. A report in 2012 for
the BC Association of Farmers
Markets pegged the average
spending of market patrons at
$28.81 a week, more than half
the average person’s grocery
bill.
The numbers look a little
better if the spending is
spread over the average 2.5-
person household, but with
many fruits and vegetables
selling for $2 a pound and up,
at least double what
supermarkets charge for the
same items, it’s easy to see
how buying local can quickly
add up.
Further $1 million
Small wonder the province
recently allocated a further $1
million to the “nutrition
coupon” program that gives
low-income families, pregnant
women and seniors $15 worth
of coupons to spend at
farmers’ markets each week.
While the program helps
approximately 10,000 people a
year, up to 20 times as many
are in some level of need.
According to Food Banks
Canada, 100,086 people in BC
accessed food banks in 2015,
up 2.8% from 2014. Twice as
many again are probably
nding it tough to stay fed,
according to Valerie Tarasuk, a
nutritional sciences professor
at the University of Toronto.
She points out that food banks
can’t meet everyone’s needs,
and most people who are
underfed make do by going
without.
Sylvain Charlebois, an
advisor to the Food Institute in
Guelph, underscores this point
by pointing to the haves – “the
foodies, the organic lovers and
fan of local products” – and
the have-nots, who struggle to
make ends meet.
“The have-nots … are not
necessarily the poor and
socially inept,” he wrote earlier
this year. “They may have lost
their jobs, recently run into
nancial diculties or trying to
raise children during a
separation. They may even be
working two or three jobs at
once.”
They don’t have time to
queue at food banks and
when faced with higher food
prices, Charlebois says they’re
turning to Wal-Mart and
Costco. These big-box retailers
have the clout to secure
quantity discounts and the
scale to move huge volumes
at a prot.
“What Wal-Mart and Costco
are doing resonates with the
have-nots,” Charlebois says.
“They are capitalizing on that
segment of the market who
must watch every cent they
spend.”
This in turn puts pressure
on other food retailers to cut
costs, resulting in pushback
against suppliers and,
ultimately, farmers. While the
big grocers are featuring more
local products in response to
the trend-setting haves,
farmers are poised to take it
on the chin as pricing drops to
serve the have-nots.
True cost of farming
The premium people are
willing to pay for local
products at farmers’ markets –
often touted as the true cost
of farming – is more likely the
extra margin smaller farmers
need.
The good news in all this
penny-pinching is found in the
Statistics Canada numbers
mentioned earlier: despite the
fear-mongering, the average
grocery bill in BC has fallen in
recent years even as farmers’
markets have seen increased
trac.
People are nding a way to
give the farmers they know a
bit more money through
direct sales, even as the larger
local producers feed the needs
of those who depend on
cheaper oerings.
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD The Investment Agriculture
Foundation of BC invested over $145 million in
BC agriculture during its rst 18 years, resulting
in an economic impact of over $350 million.
So says an Impact Assessment report
commissioned by IAF to mark its 20th
anniversary. Released in mid-September, the
report indicates that every dollar invested by
IAF results in an economic impact of $1.85.
The report states the Growing Forward 2:
Canada-BC Agri-Innovation program has
generated signicant advances in promotion
of agricultural technologies and tools.
It has enabled producers and processors to
adapt and utilize new technologies in their
production systems. Funding for the Buy Local
program has given local agricultural
processors “a more powerful and condent
presence in domestic and international
markets.”
It has also resulted in new jobs, IAF saying
each stakeholder reported at least one new
hire because of the IAF funding.
In its rst 20 years, IAF has delivered
government funding to more than 1,700
projects across British Columbia.
“This report demonstrates the impact that
collaboration between senior levels of
government and the agriculture industries can
have. By working together, BC’s agriculture is
competitive locally and internationally,
advancing with the latest technologies and
tools, and creating jobs in our province," IAF
chair Ken Bates said.
12:6(59,1*7+(
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STEVE SACCOMANO
SENIOR AGRICULTURE MANAGER
604-504-4976
604-703-5161
steve.saccomano@bmo.com
LYNN LASHUK, P.Ag
AGRICULTURE MANAGER
250-979-7827
lynn.lashuk@bmo.com
DIANE MURPHY
VICE PRESIDENT, AGRICULTURE
604-504-4980
604-302-8784
diane2.murphy@bmo.com
ABBOTSFORD
Randy Lam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-504-4626
Rick Tilitzky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-504-4970
Satpal Gill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-504-4975
Greg Ksinan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-504-4647
CHILLIWACK
Carlie Fleenor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-793-7256
David Fuerst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-793-7274
CLOVERDALE
Igor Koblizka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-574-6885
John Howard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-574-6855
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Caroline Neumann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250-703-5330
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Financing the future of agriculture. We’re here to help.
Country Life in BC • October 201614
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD – Farm Credit
Canada is advising BC farmers
to plan carefully to avoid
nancial trouble as liquidity in
the province’s agriculture
sector drops.
“Overall, Canadian farmers
are in a strong position to
service short-term
obligations,” the federal
agricultural lender states in its
recent Outlook for Farm Assets
and Debt report, released in
early September.
Producers had, on average,
assets worth 2.38 times the
value of their immediate
obligations in 2015.
But not everyone did.
“The current ratio is nearing
one in Newfoundland (1.01),
Nova Scotia (1.06) and British
Columbia (1.26) – which
suggests careful planning
must be exercised, especially
if production issues arise in
2016,” FCC said.
FCC points to real estate as
playing a critical role in farm
nances, possibly allowing
producers to carry more debt
than they can service should
nancial trouble hit.
It reports that the debt-to-
asset ratio is about 14% in BC,
versus 15.5% for Canada as a
whole. The average consumer
is carrying debts worth 17.1%
of their total assets.
“Provinces that hold a high
percentage of total assets in
land … have seen the ratio of
debt to asset decline the most
in recent years,” the report
states.
However, in BC the ratio
bucked that trend, climbing
from the long-term average of
about 12.6%.
This may be due to rising
real estate values, a
phenomenon Country Life in
BC has reported on several
times over the past decade.
Since 2006, real estate has
accounted for 90% or more of
total farm capital in BC; in
2015, it represented 91.3% of
farm capital. Put in real terms,
that’s a staggering $35 billion
out of a total capital base of
$38.3 billion.
While farm debts increased
5.7% in 2015 over 2014,
BC farmers on watch list as on-hand assets drop
Farm Credit Canada report says prudence
and flexibility needed to manage debt ratio
slightly faster than farm
capital, the actual numbers
show that farmers had
nothing to worry about. Debts
increased by approximately
$350 million, while the real
estate anchoring those debts
rose by $1.4 billion, or four
times as much.
Yet with debts accounting
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for a greater percentage of BC
farm assets, FCC isn’t about to
let farmers rest easy – and it
has backing from the people
charged with monitoring the
nancial health of the
country’s farms.
Agriculture and Agri-food
Canada forecasts BC net farm
income to be in the red this
year even as total farm
revenues post new records.
Statistics Canada reports
that farmgate sales in BC
approached $3.1 billion last
year, while overall agri-food
sales topped $13 billion in
2015. The biggest chunk of
those revenues is from value-
added products, at $9.1
billion.
BC agriculture minister
Norm Letnick says the record
gures have put BC farmers in
a strong nancial position,
one that will only strengthen
as the province’s agri-food
exports increase.
Nevertheless, federal
forecasts call for slightly lower
farmgate revenues in 2016,
driven in part by lower prices
for grains, oil seeds and
livestock. Pushback from
major retailers such as Loblaw
Companies Ltd., which
applied a discount of 1.45% to
suppliers’ invoices beginning
in September, will likely have a
knock-on eect on growers.
“The balance sheet of
agriculture is healthy, but
could face some challenges as
farm income attens and land
appreciation slows,” FCC
states. “It remains prudent for
agricultural operations to be
exible enough to amend
business plans.”
BC net farm income remains negative
Net farm income in British Columbia, 1981-2016 ($000s)
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 15
Dairy leaders are
saying mainstream
media is blowing
dairy audit failures
out of proportion.
(Cathy Glover le
photo)
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD Dairy
industry leaders say recent
animal care audits on BC
farms indicate the new
program is working, rather
than the failure of farmers to
care for their animals.
In a front-page story in
mid-September, The Province
and Vancouver Sun used
Freedom-of-Information
documents to show that over
25% of 73 farms had failed
their initial animal care
audits.
The situation is not as bad
as the story suggests, insists
BC Dairy Association (BCDA)
president Dave Taylor.
“If the inspector wrote one
corrective action, even a
minor one, it’s a fail,” he
notes, pointing out the audit
is a brand new program and
farmers are just learning what
all the requirements are.
The program is based on
the 2009 Code of Practice for
the Care and Handling of
Dairy Cattle. In September
2014, the BC Milk Marketing
Board (BCMMB) made the
code mandatory on BC dairy
farms, with the same
penalties as apply to the non-
compliance with the
Canadian Quality Milk
program.
Non-compliance punished
Farmers who are non-
compliant and fail to take
corrective action would lose
their quality bonus and
incentive days, receive no
new quota, and be barred
from making credit transfers
or using the quota exchange.
“If we were to find a
suspected case of animal
cruelty, we would refer it to
the BC SPCA. Once it’s
confirmed, we would
suspend milk pickup. If it is
not corrected, we could
cancel the licence,” says
BCMMB general manager
Bob Ingratta.
Taylor, whose farm was
among the 73 audited farms,
called the audit a thorough
process. “They were at my
farm for over an hour. They
started with the calf housing
and went up from there. They
looked at everything.”
Although his farm passed
with flying colours, “I know
other excellent farmers who
had to make some corrective
action and they did.”
BCDA executive director
Dave Eto says the fact not
everyone passed the initial
audit shows the integrity of
the program. “We raised the
bar high. If everyone
complied the first-time
around, we would be asked if
the standards were too low.
We’re learning and we’re
complying. Farmers want to
continuously improve.”
Right now, dairy farmers
are actually being subjected
to two separate audits. While
the audits referred to in the
media story were done by
BCMMB’s independent
inspectors, the BCDA is also
conducting audits as part of
the Dairy Farmers of Canada
(DFC) ProAction Initiative
(PAI).
And more inspections
Animal care was included
in PAI in November 2015, and
the BCDA started doing
inspections this year. To mid-
September, the BCDA had
performed 170 animal care
inspections and expects to
hit 250 farms by the end of
2016. The remaining 250
farms will be audited in 2017.
DFC has been training
Holstein Canada classifiers to
take over the animal care
assessments beginning in
October.
Ingratta says both audit
programs use the ProAction
workbook, which is based on
the Code of Practice, and will
be merged “as soon as
possible.” While DFC will do
the audits, Ingratta says the
BCMMB will maintain
responsibility for ensuring
compliance.
“I would hope consumers
would see this as a credible
regulatory program. It’s
working and not everyone
will pass the first time,”
Ingratta says.
Taylor says it’s all about
maintaining public trust. He
admits stories like the one in
The Province and Vancouver
Sun do not help but says
“that’s just the reality. We’re
so distant from the consumer
and who are they going to
believe? We’re just going to
keep going down a path.”
Public trust a priority
BC Agriculture Council
executive director Reg Ens
agrees. The BCAC has made
maintaining and increasing
public trust in farmers a
priority and has to take the
good with the bad.
“I heard one person say
‘you will never out-
communicate Hollywood,’
and that’s true. All we can do
is make sure we’re doing the
right thing and testing it.
That way we can tell people,
this is the improvement we
have made,” he says.
Ens notes the dairy
program was only introduced
in 2014 and had its first
inspections in 2015.
“Let’s see what 2016 and
2017 look like before we pass
judgment.”
Mainstream media isn’t telling the whole story: dairy audits
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Country Life in BC • October 2016
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 17
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD Producers
in Washington State want the
BC government to pay closer
attention to the impact urban
development and farming
practices have across the
Fraser River delta, from
Langley to Lynden.
Writing to Governor Jay
Inslee, the Ag Water Board of
Whatcom County said the six
watershed improvement
districts it represents have
worked to maintain local
streams in a way that serves
the interests of both sh and
farmers.
Unfortunately, the board
alleges that activities north of
the border are working
against those eorts,
exacerbating the problems of
Whatcom County farmers.
“We have seen several of
our trans-boundary streams
dried up due to dams in
British Columbia,” states the
letter, signed by potato
farmer Scott Bedlington, chair
of the Ag Water Board. “We
request you to bring this issue
to the attention of the British
Columbia government, the
BC-Washington
Environmental Co-operation
Council and the International
Joint Commission which
addresses trans-boundary
concerns.”
December 2015 letter
The letter follows a
December 2015 plea by the
Washington Department of
Agriculture for BC to clean up
its act with respect to fecal
coliform in Perry Homestead
Brook and Pepin Creek.
The two streams are
tributaries of Bertrand Creek
and Fishtrap Creek in
Whatcom County, which feed
into Portage Bay – where
shellsh harvesting by the
native Lummi has been
largely closed due to high
coliform counts since late
2014.
“Calculations estimate
nearly a 90% reduction is
needed in bacteria loads in
Bertrand Creek at the border,
while an approximately 40%
to 60% reduction in loads
appears necessary in Fishtrap
Creek,” state ocials
reported.
Now it’s time for BC
Gerald Baron,
spokesperson for county
farmers, said that group
members have done their
part now it’s time for BC to
take action.
“There are many partners
and moving parts to this,” he
said. “You can’t solve the
water quality and the water
supply issues by only
addressing farmers. It involves
our city, county and, in our
case, it also involves our
Canadian neighbours.”
Co-operation is particularly
critical because Whatcom
County farmers face
accusations that they’re being
irresponsible. To counter the
allegations, the Ag Water
Board joined forces in June
2015 with the Whatcom
County Dairy Federation to
form Whatcom Family
Farmers, an advocacy group
representing nearly 400
commercial farmers and
about 1,000 small-scale
Whatcom County farmers look to BC producers for co-operation
farmers.
The new group has
documented the success of
nutrient management
regimes on local farmers and
the work done to improve
local watercourses.
But it’s a dierent story
north of the border.
While municipalities and
farmers spend tens of
thousands every year in ditch
maintenance, surface water
continues to harbour bacteria.
Urban design practices
Even though better
management of the 2.8
million cubic metres of
manure Fraser Valley livestock
produce each year has been
helpful, urban design
practices that increase storm
water run o have
exacerbated the problem.
“Urban areas are major
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contributors of fecal coliform
contamination,” the Whatcom
Family Farmers note in
research documents. “The
percentage of paved and
developed areas in the
Canadian portion of the
Bertrand watershed has more
than doubled in the past 50
years, and the paved
percentage of Fishtrap
watershed in Canada is even
higher, at double that of the
Bertrand.”
The water only becomes
dirtier after passing through
Lynden, thanks to a frothy
mix of leakage from aging
wastewater infrastructure, pet
droppings and wildlife that
boosts stormwater bacteria.
Similar concerns exist in
BC, where contamination of
the Abbotsford-Sumas aquifer
has been a concern for
decades. Reduced ows in
Water quality issues south of the Canada/US border have Washington farming groups lobbying their
state capital to pressure ocials north of the border to urge BC farmers to clean up their act. (File photo)
Washington producers blame contamination
on urban, rural issues north of the border
See “RESOURCES” page 18
Country Life in BC • October 201618
RESOURCES LACKING From page 17
Perry Homestead Brook have also
factored into decisions by the
province’s environmental
assessment board against
applications for water storage
licenses in the area.
Yet the concerns of Whatcom
farmers regarding these long-
standing issues don’t seem to have
registered.
BC Ministry of Agriculture sta
were unable to say whether or not
December’s letter from the
Washington State Department of
Agriculture was being acted on.
BC Agriculture Council executive
director Reg Ens said there’s a
measure of international
co-operation through the BC-
Washington Environmental
Co-operation Council, but that his
organization hasn’t been in touch
with farm organizations in the US.
“I don’t have enough resources to
chase everything,” he said. “This is an
intergovernmental discussion at this
point. We’ll just continue working
with the people we are working with
to look at what our best practices on
farms are and make sure we’re trying
to implement those best practices as
much as we can here.”
Horse country
Many properties in the area of
Perry Homestead Brook are
equestrian operations, and Ens noted
that the past three years have seen
greater eorts to encourage
members of Horse Council BC – one
of the BCAC’s constituent
organizations – to develop
environmental farm plans.
“[We’re] encouraging them to do
environmental farm plans in that
area because a lot of small farms can
actually create the same problem as
one larger farm,” Ens said.
However, no one from HCBC
responded to a call for comment on
the allegations of damming and
water contamination.
Common practices needed
Baron says that the farmers he
represents would like to see
producers on both sides of the
border working together to protect
the environment fundamental to the
pursuits of both. Common practices
would also help protect farmers on
both sides of the border against
charges from conservation groups
that claim farmers aren’t doing their
part to protect the environment.
“[Whatcom] farmers are not trying
to point any ngers at any
individuals over there or even
farming in general,” he said, referring
to BC farmers. “The point is that
farmers are under a lot of pressure in
Whatcom County relating to water
issues, both water quality and water
access into the streams. With these
things coming at us, we need to nd
a way to respond.
Levi DeWitt, 8, was delighting fairgoers as he walked around the IPE dairy barn
with his heifer calf, Gertie, from the family dairy during this year’s fair in
Armstrong. Levi is a pre-clubber with the Eagle Valley 4-H Club out of Sicamous.
(Cathy Glover photo)
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 19
Hank Markgraf, grower services manager at BC Tree Fruits, and
Melissa Tesche, acting general manager of the Okanagan Kootenay
Sterile Insect Release Program, log into the Decision Aide System, a
pest management tool developed by the University of Washington
newly acquired to support BC fruit tree growers. (Tom Walker photo)
by TOM WALKER
KELOWNA – A collaborative
eort across the tree fruit
industry has brought a web-
based program to BC that will
help fruit growers with their
pest management practices.
The Decision Aid System
(DAS) is a computer-modeling
program developed by the
University of Washington to
support that state’s fruit
industry. DAS links real time
weather data and forecasting
with pest, disease and
horticulture models to
recommend the timing and
type of intervention strategies
that growers can use for pest
management.
“It really speaks to the
co-operation across the
industry that we have been
able to bring in this program in
just ten months,” says Melissa
Tesche, acting general
manager of the Okanagan-
Kootenay Sterile Insect Release
Program (SIR).
The idea came from
Okanagan stakeholder
meetings of the Climate Action
Initiative begun in December
2015.
“Pest management was seen
as the number two issue for
climate adaptation, behind
water,” explains Tesche.
“I took a look at what I
thought the eects of climate
change on pest management
would be and looked at how
other people had addressed
the problem and found this
Washington system. DAS was
referred to as the Cadillac of
decision-aid systems,” says
Tesche. “When I spoke with
industry leaders, we realized
that it could work through
collaboration, each individual
group putting in their own
part.”
The BC Fruit Growers
Association, BC Tree Fruits
Co-op and their eld service
sta, grape growers, cattlemen,
private consultants, as well as
personnel from Agriculture
and Agri-Food Canada and the
BC Ministry of Agriculture
worked together.
“All these parts came
together in less than a year,”
she says.
When an operator logs into
the DAS (it’s tablet and cell
phone friendly) and they
search a particular pest, a
screen comes up with real time
data on weather, degree days,
current conditions/
stages of the pest and
recommended practices at
that stage. A list of
interventions can be brought
up, including recommended
sprays (both conventional and
organic) and their timing, as
well as a description of how
those interventions will aect
benecials in the orchard. The
program incorporates weather
forecasts to make predictions
to highlight issues that may be
coming in the next week or so.
Tesche says adapting the
Washington tool makes a lot of
sense.
“First of all, we are getting a
model that is the closest to our
own Okanagan climate,” she
points out. Indeed, BC Tree
Fruits eld services
horticulturist Lyndsay
Hainstock has an account and
has been using information
from Oroville, Washington, just
across the border from
Osoyoos, to help her advise
growers.
The University of
Washington has been building
and operating the program
since 2008.
“They have full time
programmers on the project
and are constantly xing bugs
and updating the website to
make it grower friendly,” says
Tesche. “We’ve been able to
buy a yearly subscription that
allows us to access their sta
without having to become
experts in the program
ourselves.”
“We will have to adapt it to
Canadian and BC models and
practices,” Tesche point out.
First o, BC weather stations
will need to be linked into the
system.
“We are going to use the
models that are in there, but
we need to have our Canadian
scientists and industry
personnel look at them and
make sure they hold true for
this area,” she adds.
Management
recommendations from the BC
Tree Fruits’ Production Guide
will be uploaded. Intervention
recommendations will have to
correspond with Canadian
regulations.
“Some of the chemical
products from the US are not
approved for use in Canada,”
Tesche notes.
Funding of $90,000 will be
provided by a Climate Action
Committee grant as one of the
projects for the Okanagan.
That money will go towards
creating and testing a
Canadian version. BC will
provide the data and DAS
programmers will work to
adapt the system.
“The SIR board saw the
value of this project to support
our codling moth program and
they have agreed to fund the
subscription costs for the next
three years, which are around
$40,000 US each year,” says
Tesche. “And they’ll provide
some money for adapting the
model to Canadian standards.”
“We hope to have a version
available for initial beta testing
with a small group of growers
and personnel sometime
during the 2017 growing
season.”
Pest management strategies about to get easier
Adapting Washington web-based program for BC farmers
2017 Tree Fruit Replant Program
BC FRUIT GROWERS’ ASSOCIATION
1-800-619-9022 (ext 1)
email: info@bcfga.com
www.bcfga.com
2017 Tree Fruit Replant Program
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Application forms and the updated requirements of the 2017 Tree Fruit
Replant Program are now available on the BCFGA website, www.bcfga.com, and
on the BC Ministry of Agriculture website, http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/
content/industry/agriculture-seafood/programs/treefruit-replant-program.
Project applications (along with the required Replant Plan) will be
received between August 1 and October 31, 2016. Please avoid the last
minute rush and get your application in early.
An horticultural advisor is required to help prepare and sign individual
applications for the 2017 Tree Fruit Replant Program. The following
information will be provided to assist growers in completing applications.
a. A list of qualied advisors.
b. Information on project grading.
c. Program operational policies.
d. A series of reports on replanting and variety performance
and selection are available and should be referenced when
preparing a Tree Fruit Replant Program Application.
The Tree Fruit Replant Program provides funding for quality projects.
Applications will be rated by a committee of horticultural experts. The
rating of individual applications will be based on meeting the program
requirements and on the quality of the Replant Plan. Projects will be
placed in order of rating for projects, and the top-rated projects will be
approved until all funding is utilized.
The Tree Fruit Replant Program is a 7 year, $9.4 million
program, funded by the Province of BC.
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Country Life in BC • October 201620
A study by researchers at
the University of British
Columbia has identied the
genes responsible for the
tough bres in the stem of the
ax plant, a bane of many
Canadian ax farmers during
harvest.
The ndings open up the
potential for genetically
engineering some of that
toughness out and relieving
the excessive wear and tear on
farm equipment that costs
hundreds of hours and
thousands of dollars to deal
with. Further research may
also provide farmers with
more economic opportunities
from the ax waste material.
“Flax is the only major crop
that makes bast bres in its
stem,” says Dr. Michael
Deyholos, professor and head
of biology at the UBC’s
Okanagan campus. “Bast bres
are a special type of cell
arranged in bundles just under
the stem surface and they are
remarkably strong. They are
stronger than steel, on the
basis of their weight. Flax bast
bres have been used to make
linen textiles for thousands of
years. Some ax varieties have
been selected because they
make lots of oil-rich seeds but
all varieties contain at least
some bast bres.
“In North America, we only
grow the seed-type varieties
so the strong bres are a
nuisance to linseed farmers
because they can easily
become wound
around the axles and
rotors of farm
equipment, causing
damage including re
due to the friction of
the machinery on the
bound bers. In
Europe [where they] grow
bre ax, the bast bres are
graded on things like their
length, neness and colour.”
Deyholos and his former
graduate student at the
University of Alberta dissected
thousands of the plants’ stems
to identify which genes in the
plant’s make-up were
responsible for its unique
growth.
“We are learning that the
process of making a bast bre
is quite dierent from making
a wood bre,” explains
Deyholos. “Even though both
are rich in cellulose, the
cellulose is arranged in a very
unique way in the bast bre,
which is what gives it so much
strength.
To make this special
cellulose, the bast bre rst
builds a scaold that the
cellulose is organized on. The
whole process requires the
precisely timed activity of
several hundred genes (but)
we really know the functions
of maybe only half of these
genes.”
Even so, Deyholos says
weakening something in plant
genetics is almost always
easier than strengthening it,
therefore reducing the
strength of the bres will be a
relatively easy challenge.
“We have already proven
that if we get rid of just one of
the genes that makes the
scaold, we can reduce the
strength of the bres. We are
now working on nding a few
non-GMO variants with weaker
bres that we can test in the
eld.”
While they cannot eliminate
the bre completely, they
UBC research bringing
flax fibre facts to the fore
They may be awfully pretty but they’re tough as nails. UBC research scientists are studying the genes
of ax plants to see if there is a way to mitigate the damage their inner tough bres have on
machinery during harvest. (File photo)
believe they can reduce their
strength to a degree to make
the plant easier for farmers to
manage.
“We will make a variety that
has, say, a 15% strength
reduction, another that has
30% reduction, and another
than has 50% reduction and
give them all to breeders to
test which one works best.”
According to the Flax
Council of Canada, Canada is
among the largest ax
producers in the world. The
blue-owered plant crop
grows on the prairies and
Canada’s brown ax seed, with
its omega-3 fatty acid, is a
consumer favourite. According
to StatsCan, in 2014/2015,
Canada produced 816,000
tonnes of the plant and
exported 633,000 tonnes of
axseed, 56% of which went to
China and 23% to Europe.
“The ax we grow is of the
linseed-type [which] does have
bast bre but not as much and
not as high quality as the bre-
type ax grown in Europe,”
says Deyholos. “[In addition],
we don't have the facilities or
climate to harvest ax bres in
the way it has been done
traditionally. Because of this,
there isn't a market for the
Canadian linseed straw. There
was a small market for some of
the straw in making cigarette
papers, but I think this market
has dried up.”
Deyholos believes, however,
that through some genetic
modication and possibly new
machinery, linseed ax bre
can be used as a replacement
for glass in breglass-like
composite materials.
Fibreglass is made from
glass bres embedded in a
synthetic resin and the bres
provide strength to the
See “LESS” page 21
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MARGARET EVANS
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 21
LESS ABRASIVE From page 20
Turkey board, growers
celebrate 50 years
by DAVID SCHMIDT
LANGLEY
The BC Turkey
Marketing Board (BCTMB)
celebrated its 50th anniversary
at a luncheon in Langley,
September 8, and at least one
person in the audience was
there at the very beginning.
Ron Heppell, one of the
founders of the board, noted
his family, which is still active
in the turkey industry, raised
their rst 150 turkeys in 1942.
“My dad and uncle made so
much money that year, they
each got 500 turkey poults the
next year,” he recounted.
The turkeys were
slaughtered and plucked but
not eviscerated, then sold as
“New York dressed” at
Woodwards, then a major
Vancouver food store.
Those heady days did not
last. Prices dropped and
Heppell recalls that one year,
his family actually had to pay
back some of the money they
had received after the retailers
claimed they had been unable
to sell all the Christmas
turkeys.
By the 1960’s, Panco
Poultry had moved in to
become the area’s major
turkey processor and
wholesaler. While Heppell
credits Panco for building the
local industry, he claims “they
also wanted to own it. They
were building 11 turkey farms
which led us to form the
turkey board in 1966.”
Heppell noted the industry
has come a long way in the
decades since, with none of
the volatility of those early
years.
“As I see how smoothly
things are going now, I thank
the guys who went before.”
Surrey-Cloverdale MLA and
Minister of Children & Family
Development Stephanie
Cadieux represented
agriculture minister Norm
Letnick at the luncheon. She
noted that for the turkey
industry and agriculture in
general to have a sustainable
future, the industry needs
young farmers and young
leaders.
“I encourage the older
farmers who can remember
1966 to pass on your
memories,” she said.
50 years highlights
Current BCTMB director
Shawn Heppell recounted
highlights of the board’s 50-
year history, noting growers
produced less than 16,000
pounds (7,300 kg) eviscerated
weight in the board’s rst year.
By comparison, BC produced
over 20 million kgs of turkey in
the past year.
The group included two
former producer-board chairs:
Ron Heppell and Jim
Pennington; and all three of
the appointed chairs: Ron
Charles, Ralph Payne and Phil
Hochstein.
Growers also welcomed
back two of their long-term
employees: Colyn Welsh, the
BCTMB general manager from
1976 to 2006, and Linda
Beckstead, the administrative
secretary from 1989 to 2009.
Past and present members of the BC Turkey Marketing Board gathered to celebrate the board’s 50th
anniversary in Langley, September 15. Front, left to right are Shawn Heppell, one of the founding
members Ron Heppell and Jim Pennington, chair in the 1980’s; Rear, from left to right, Vic Redekop,
current chair Phil Hochstein, Les Burm, the board’s rst appointed chair Ron Charles, and former chair
Ralph Payne. (David Schmidt photo)
material. Natural bres are less
dense than glass, he says, so
you can get stronger
composites with less total
weight. Natural bres are less
abrasive, potentially less
expensive and more
sustainable than glass.
“We are currently working
with the Composites
Innovation Centre (CIC) in
Manitoba and David Levin
(University of Manitoba) on a
project funded by Genome
Canada to try to do this,” he
says. “The really interesting
thing is that while my focus is
on replacing glass with natural
bres, David's focus is on
replacing the synthetic resins
of breglass with renewable,
biodegradable bioresins. So
we hope to be able to replace
breglass with more
sustainable biomaterials in the
near future.”
The breglass project is one
of several ongoing in
Deyholos’ lab. His research was
recently published in the
journal Frontiers of Plant
Science.
by CAM FORTEMS
KAMLOOPS – One name,
two fairs, two locations.
Two rival agricultural
groups both claim they are the
rightful home to the Provincial
Winter Fair – and one is suing
the other, claiming its name,
logo and organization was
ripped o by a newcomer with
a name designed to confuse
the public.
Kamloops Exhibition
Association (KXA), which traces
its roots to 1895, led a lawsuit
in BC Supreme Court against
the Provincial Winter Fair
Society and seven people.
Six of them are former
organizers with the KXA’s own
Winter Fair committee, while a
seventh is a former
bookkeeper for the KXA.
At the same time as the
lawsuit is ongoing, the two
groups continued to plan for
the competing events,
September 23-26. The
Kamloops fair was held at the
Circle Creek Ranch while the
Barriere fair continued at the
community's fall fair grounds,
where it has been held since
2011.
The lawsuit claims the
competing Provincial Winter
Fair Society was formed in
March by the seven people
named in the lawsuit and
began using the name, forms
and logo in its marketing.
“The defendants have
caused confusion and
misrepresented their
connection with the plainti’s
Provincial Winter Fair in
numerous ways,” reads the
statement of claim.
The event is an opportunity
for 4-H members to showcase
and sell everything from
rabbits to lambs and calves.
It was started by the KXA in
1939 and remained for seven
decades one of the signature
events in a city built on an
agricultural economy. After
the KXA lost its home at
Mount Paul Industrial Park, it
moved the fair to the North
Thompson Agriplex in Barriere
in 2011. Its long-term goal was
to return to Kamloops once an
agricultural complex was
developed.
A BC Supreme Court judge
declined to place an injunction
that would have halted the
Barriere fair. The two sides are
scheduled to go to a full trial
next year.
Fair fight over unfair tactics
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JD 5100M | CAB | MFWD | 32F/16R POWER-REVERSER | TRIPLE MID AND REAR
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JD 7330 | CAB | MFWD | 125 HP | 20 SPD POWERQUAD | 3 SCV |
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JD 6125R | CAB | MFWD | 24 SPD AUTOQUAD | H340 LOADER | 1,288
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 23
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
PrairieCoast Equipment has
launched a new charity
program to support kids in
its dealership areas.
They created the Green
Apron Project, PCE’s official
charity arm, launching the
project by serving pancake
breakfasts by donation at
seven of its nine dealerships
in early to mid-September.
“We have always had a
heart for charity,” says PCE
marketing co-ordinator
Celina Frisson.
For the past three years,
company staff had been
going to Mexico to build
homes there but recently
decided “we wanted to focus
more on our local areas.”
That led the company to
Country Life in BC • October 201624
Charity helps students to be hungry for knowledge, not food
Feds invest in FV dairy innovation
create the Green Apron
Project. PCE has committed
to raising $300,000 and
contributing 5,000 volunteer
hours over the next three
years. PCE has a three-year
agreement with the
Breakfast Club of Canada
which will use the funds to
provide breakfasts at
approved schools. As their
volunteer commitment, PCE
staff will go to schools being
supported and help them
make breakfasts before
coming to work.
Fulfilling mission
Frisson says food was the
compelling reason for the
project. “We want our kids
hungry for knowledge, not
hungry for food. Our primary
objective is to fulfill our
mission of Feeding Our
Communities.”
Initial response from PCE
customers and friends has
been encouraging, with
Frisson reporting the first
four launch events raised
about $1,500.
On an ongoing basis, PCE
will be selling John Deere
lunch kits for $5 in all of their
stores, with proceeds going
to the Green Apron Project.
Chilliwack MLA John Martin (without an apron) joined sta of Prairie Coast Equipment in Chilliwack,
September 10, for the launch of PCE’s Green Apron Project. PCE has pledged to raise $300,000 for
school breakfast programs in its dealership areas over the next three years. (David Schmidt photo)
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by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
Federal
Minister of Agriculture and
Agri-Food Lawrence
MacAulay has made one of
the largest-ever government
investments in the BC
agrifood sector.
MacAulay was at Vitalus
Nutrition in Abbotsford,
September 9, to announce an
investment of $10 million to
help the company
commercialize a value-added
prebiotic.
The investment is being
made through the ve-year
$698 million Growing Forward
2 AgriInnovation Program.
Supporting health
“This investment is a great
example of government
working with industry to
introduce new food products
that support the health of
Canadians and that increase
the competitiveness of
Canada’s agriculture sector.
This innovative technology
will help the industry stay on
the cutting edge and capture
new markets for dairy
ingredients here in Canada
and around the world,”
MacAulay said.
Vitalus built Canada’s rst
milk protein concentrate
plant in 2005 and has since
become a leading supplier of
customized dairy ingredients
to the food, beverage and
nutraceutical industries.
It recently developed a
proprietary technology to
extract GOS (galactooligo
saccharides) from milk
permeate.
Vitalus president Peter
Vanderpol described the
prebiotic’s attributes at the
recent meeting of the
International Association of
Milk Control Agencies, saying
it can withstand heat and
freezing, making it ideal for
enhancing the nutritional
characteristics of infant
formulations, dairy products
and beverages, fruit drinks
and fruit preparations.
Transforming by-product
In its media release
announcing the investment,
Agriculture and Agri-food
Canada said “commercializing
this new ingredient will help
the dairy industry transform a
currently unused by-product
into a value-added functional
food product.”
Vanderpol said the
government’s nancial
support “has been key in the
development of VITAGOS™.”
The new prebiotic is also
expected to benet from
favourable pricing introduced
as part of the Canadian milk
industry’s new Ingredients
Strategy.
www.AgSafeBC.ca
WORKER SAFETY
SHOULD BE YOUR
TOP PRIORITY
www.AgSafeBC.ca
WORKER SAFETY
SHOULD BE YOUR
TOP PRIORITY
www.AgSafeBC.ca
WORKER SAFETY
SHOULD BE YOUR
TOP PRIORITY
PCE commits to raising $300K
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 25
Stories by PETER MITHAM
OLIVER Despite fears of
being slammed by another
early vintage, Okanagan grape
growers were bracing for an
onslaught of red grapes as
Country Life in BC went to
press.
Many growers who picked
white varieties in August were
thankful for some breathing
room and the prospect of
some fruitful hang-time for
their red varieties.
“The acid and pH are right
where you want them,” said
Larry Gerelus, principal of
Stag’s Hollow Winery and
Vineyard in Okanagan Falls.
Gerelus sources grapes
from vineyards in Naramata,
Okanagan Falls and Osoyoos.
The vineyards yield grapes for
elegant Grenache and
Tempranillo wines. The
composition of this year’s fruit
promises more of the same as
sugar levels remain in step
with the physiological
ripeness of the grapes.
Grapes are physically
mature at veraison, which
occurred in July, positioning
them for the home stretch in
August and September when
phenolic components
develop to a point where the
grapes are considered ripe for
the picking.
This year’s warm weather
kicked them to veraison early,
while hits of cool, damp
weather tempered the
development of the avours
winemakers and consumers
prize. This has kept sugars in
check while acids haven’t
dropped out as in other years.
“We’re getting some
surprising avours,” Gerelus
said.
Earliest ever
Lariana Cellars, which
claims to be the southernmost
winery in the Okanagan with a
location nestled up against
the border on 2nd Avenue in
Osoyoos, had completed its
Viognier harvest by
September 7. This was the
earliest Viognier harvest ever
for owners Dan Scott who
operates the winery and its
ve-acre estate vineyard with
Pick early, pick often
Grape growers going “gangbusters” as annual harvest picks up
his wife, Carol.
Scott said he hopes the red
grapes he uses for his red
blends will hang on until at
the end of September, giving
him some breathing space.
Poised to hang on
That’s likely, in the opinion
of Graham Pierce, winemaker
at Black Hills Estate Winery on
the Black Sage bench
opposite Oliver.
Pierce was expecting to
pick Chardonnay grapes in
mid-September, while red
varieties such as Merlot,
Cabernet Sauvignon and
Syrah, were poised to hang on
a little longer.
With temperatures not
expected to exceed the mid
20s, Pierce believes the grapes
should respond well, with the
major risk being an early frost
as October progresses. (Most
long-term forecasts don’t
foresee that happening.)
“[It’s] where you get a lot of
that really good avor
development,” he said.
Back in Okanagan Falls,
Roland Kruger of Wild Goose
Vineyards said “fruit is looking
fantastic.”
The growing season made
for little disease pressure, and
pests weren’t a problem,
either. The fruit is clean and
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While good weather has grape growers breathing a sigh of
relief, orchardists continue to scramble as the same weather has
handed them a bountiful crop of fruit.
Cherries came on strong this summer thanks to a blast of
early-season heat, then storms had them scrambling to pull o
the crop to avoid split fruit. Peaches and other stone fruit soon
followed.
Now, apple growers are competing for workers as their fruit
arrives early. Many varieties are coming on two weeks earlier
than usual, and a mid-season increase in the minimum wage is
adding to the pressure on growers.
The timing is “awkward,” according to the BC Fruit Growers
Association.
The new wage of $10.85 applies to all workers, both hourly
and piece-rate pickers. However, vacation pay of 4% is included
in piece rates whereas it is additional to the hourly wage.
The increase of 40 cents per hour is a prelude to a further
increase in September 2017 to at least $11.25. The move is
designed to lift BC’s minimum wage from the lowest in Canada
to something closer to the average. However, BC’s cost of living
still ranks among the highest in the country, thanks largely to
housing costs.
Like other commodities in the Okanagan this summer, the grape
harvest is also ahead of schedule. (Cathy Glover le photo)
coming in steadily from both
its estate vineyard and
contract growers.
“We’re ecstatic that grapes
are coming in when they
should be,” he said. “It’s
gangbusters from here on in.”
BC vineyards yielded 32,848
tons of grapes in 2015. Good
growing conditions and new
plantings could push that
north of 35,000 this year.
Country Life in BC • October 201626
by KATHY MICHAELS
KELOWNA – The Okanagan
may soon have a one-stop
shop in the north end where
local foodies can shop and
farmers will sell their wares.
“We formed the Okanagan
Food Hub Co-Operative in
March,” says Wolf Wesle of
Green Croft Gardens and a
regular contributer to the
Kelowna Farmers and Crafters
Market.
“Geographically, the co-op
covers the area from Salmon
Arm to the border in the
South Okanagan, and the
centre is in Kelowna. And now
we have been approached by
a developer that has a
building and location and
they think a co-op would go
well there.”
Wesle is currently staying
mum on the address but says
it will be in the North End
neighbourhood of Kelowna.
His cautious approach in
sharing a potential location is
because the last time Kelowna
seemed poised to have a food
co-op, chaos ensued.
Nearly three years ago, a
plan for a Granville Island-type
market at the old BC Tree Fruit
packinghouse was proposed.
As some made a push for the
Kelowna Farmers and Crafters
market to relocate to the
North End, relationships
fractured and volunteer
boards rose and fell. In the
end, the developer behind the
market plan never followed
through and the status quo
was maintained.
It was upheaval that Wesle
was right in the middle of.
“The current co-op has
grown out of that disastrous
ending,” says Wesle. “The
mistake we made was we
assumed that everybody
wants to grow their business
and that just isn’t so … but
there are a lot of farmers who
nd that two markets aren’t
enough anymore.”
Many of those farmers have
already joined the co-op and
they will likely continue their
relationship with the farmers
market.
Wesle stressed this is
meant to augment what’s
already available and there’s
more than enough
opportunities for both
ventures to exist. Studies
suggest farmers markets only
account for one-and-a-half
per cent of all grocery dollars
spent in a community.
And on the developer side
of the equation, Wesle says
the new proposal is more
realistic.
“It’s smaller. The building at
this point is a large building
Kelowna food hub
getting closer to reality
with a large outdoor portion
that goes with it,” he explains.
“We will not be using all of the
building and we will be
looking for other interested
parties to move in.”
Some examples that have
been discussed are a sh
store, or coee roasters and
bakery.
To get to that point,
though, the co op needs to
raise enough support and
money to gain access to
federal grant funds.
The co-op board is working
with a consultancy group who
has done farmers market work
with Kamloops and Vancouver
farmers markets and has a
plan in place.
Once everything is up and
running, the board will hire a
manager to run the store.
At a meeting held in
September, 30 people
attended and expressed a
desire to be shareholder.
Another meeting is scheduled
for mid December.
Kathy Michaels writes for the
Kelowna Capital News
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 27
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ALDERGROVE – A different day. A different
judge. A different result.
A week after being named the supreme
champion female at the Interior Provincial
Exhibition beef show, GH Uptown Destiny did not
even make it into the championship round at the
West Coast Hereford Club Mark of Excellence
Show at North Bluff Farms in Aldergrove,
September 10.
This was West Coast’s fourth-annual MOE show
and it is catching on with exhibitors, who brought
31 entries into the ring compared to only 20 in the
Hereford classes at the IPE. This does not diminish
Destiny’s IPE placing. To earn the supreme
championship, she not only had to win the
Hereford championship but become the
consensus favourite among the three judges
comparing the champions of all the beef breeds at
the IPE.
Grand champ Sharden Yolinda 1Y
At Aldergrove, judge Blaine Brost of Alberta
awarded the female senior and grand
championships to Sharden Yolinda 1Y, a five-year-
old cow shown by Ed Conroy and Murray Gore of
Kootenay Polled Herefords. In earning the awards,
Yolinda was undoubtedly helped by her 2016 bull
calf, Kootenay 001A Anodyne 10D. The strapping
young bull was an easy victor in the bull calf class
and named the reserve grand champion bull. The
only bull to beat him was CCR 950 Barcode 38B, a
two-year-old shown by Copper Creek Ranch of
Princeton. In this case, the pair duplicated their
positions at the IPE Hereford show with Barcode
the grand champion and Anodyne in reserve.
FV Hereford MOE show growing in popularity
The championships were a fitting sendoff for
Conroy, as the well-loved and well-respected
Hereford breeder (and former agriculture
minister) is being forced to retire due to health
issues.
For his reserve champion female, Brost chose
the first-place yearling heifer, SF 7X Constance 1C,
shown by Smith Farms of Abbotsford.
Named the reserve senior champion female was
McLennan Creek 66X Nadine 12A, shown by
McLennan Creek Herefords of Abbotsford.
Although North Bluff didn’t earn any
championship banners, the farm was named the
show’s premier breeder and exhibitor.
“I guess it helps to show a lot of cattle,” owner
Vic Redekop quipped.
Going out on top! Health issues are forcing Ed Conroy (behind the cow) of Kootenay Polled Herefords in Castlegar
to retire but he is going out on top. Judge Blaine Brost of Alberta selected KPH’s ve-year-old cow, Sharden
Yolinda 1Y, as the grand champion female at the West Coast Hereford Club MOE show in Aldergrove, September
10. Leading the cow is co-owner Murray Gore while Mitchell Krause is leading her bull calf, Kootenay 001A
Anodyne 10D, separately named the show’s reserve champion bull. (David Schmidt photo)
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Country Life in BC • October 201628
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 29
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ARMSTRONG
While other dairy shows continue to struggle,
the Interior Provincial Exhibition open dairy show continues to
expand.
Judge William Wikkerink of Duncan had 62 Holstein and 48
Jersey calves, heifers and cows to choose from for his grand
champions, August 31. While the Jersey numbers were identical
to 2015, there were 14 more animals in the Holstein show than
the previous year.
IPE president Thys Haambuckers of Glorybound Holsteins in
Enderby proved his worth in the show ring as Wikkerink chose
Triple S Diamond Jamal, a mature cow shown by Glorybound
and Triple S Farms, as the grand champion Jersey. Diamond
Jamal was also named the BMO Jersey Supercow, which
recognizes both production and performance in the show ring,
giving the Haambuckers family a $500 bonus. Earning reserve
grand champion honours was three-year-old Starcrest OT
Africka, shown by Jim and Kirsty McAvoy of Starcrest Farms in
Armstrong.
Triple S/Glorybound also earned the premier exhibitor banner
in the Jersey show. Named the premier breeder was the oldest
exhibitor in the show, Don Hendrickson of Enderby, proving he
has not lost a step after more than 65 years of showing and
breeding outstanding Jersey cattle.
Shadynook’s Jersey string
Dave Vander Spoel of Shadynook Farms in Enderby does not
have Hendrickson’s storied history but is quickly assembling a
show-winning Jersey string. He earned both the junior and
reserve junior championship banners, topping the eld with his
junior yearling, Ciaquato-Rh Premier Quivver and placing
second with his summer yearling, Winterplace Premier Glitter.
To prove the days when show cattle were not necessarily
high-producing cows are long gone, the grand champion
Holstein was also the winner of the Scotiabank Holstein
Supercow competition, which also carries a $500 bonus.
Those awards went to Hamming Windbrook Darlina, a four-
year-old cow shown by Hamming Holsteins in Vernon. The grand
championship was a repeat win for Darlina, as she was also the
grand champion of last year’s IPE Holstein show. The Hamming
family easily claimed the premier Holstein exhibitor banner after
also taking both the reserve and reserve junior championships.
Springbend Reginald Drum Roll was named the junior champion
while Hamming Solomon Clarissa stood right beside her in both
the junior championship and the senior calf class.
The reserve grand championship went to Sunnyhome
Dempsey Roxy, a junior three-year-old shown by the Carlson
family of Sunnyhome Farms in Salmon Arm. Sunnyhome was
also the Holstein show’s premier breeder.
Glorybound Holsteins takes honours at IPE dairy
Grand champions of the 2016 Jersey show at the IPE are, from left, judge William
Wikkerink, Allyson and Ashley McAvoy, Kirsty McAvoy (Starcrest) with reserve
champion Starcrest of Africka and Travis Haambuckers on the halter of grand
champion Jersey Triple S Diamond Jamal. (Gary Booy photos)
IPE grand champion Holstein cow Hamming Windbrook Darlina, bred and owned by
Hamming Holsteins of Vernon, also took home the coveted overall supreme
champion banner. From left to right are Dave Hamming, judge William Wikkerink,
Mike Haambuckers and Brian Hamming. (Photos courtesy of BC Holstein News)
Country Life in BC • October 201630
by TOM WALKER
OLIVER – As you come up to Southern Plus
Feedlots on the Oliver east bench, heat loving red
grapes line one side of the road. Across the way, few
signs remain of the once thriving feedlot. Instead of
the sounds of cattle, you hear the loud crack of an
air gun that scares away grape-stealing starlings.
That gunshot announces the end of a cattle
industry institution in the Okanagan. Southern Plus
Feedlots shipped its last animals in July and an
auction in early September sold every last piece of
equipment, the barn, the hay in that barn and even
the cement blocks that made up the silage pit.
“This is the best pocket of grape growing land in
BC,” says long time owner Bill Freding. He says the
Black Sage bench is perfect for the Cabernet
Sauvignon and Syrah varieties he grows in his 50
acre vineyard.
Bill has sold his feedlot and vineyard to wine
industry giant Mission Hill.
“When I heard that Chinese investors were
looking to buy vineyards in the South Okanagan, I
knew it was a good time to sell,” he quips.
But that wasn’t always the case.
When Bill and his wife, Darlene, bought the land
and feedlot from the receiver in 1988, it was with the
intention of building a cattle feeding business.
Interest rates were coming o record highs, the
grape industry in the Okanagan was in shambles,
the exisitng feedlot was in receivership and Bill had
a ranching background, a degree in agriculture
economics and animal nutrition.
“I was born into the cattle business,” Bill points
out. “My great grandfather was John Fall Allison, one
of the rst ranchers in this neck of the woods.”
End of an era as Okanagan feedlot packs it in
He started ranching in 1976 after university and
following several years of leasing land, he and
Darlene had bought a ranch in the Cariboo. Bill was
working for the Farm Credit Review Board and his
wife was cooking in logging camps so they could
aord to nance the ranch.
“We sold out in the Cariboo and got this place for
20 cents on the dollar.”
It had been operating as the Southern Interior
Beef Corporation – a failed eort of a group of about
20 ranchers who had put up money and received
government support to get the industry going in
the Okanagan.
Bill built a successful feedlot, leasing former
Now that the last of the cattle operation has been dispersed by auction, Bill Freding is nally ready to retire. For
decades, he and wife Darlene have been an institution in cattle circles in the South Okanagan, owning and
operating Southern Plus Feedlot that, during its heyday, had upwards of 7500 head in its pens. (Tom Walker photo)
Please see “PLONK” page 31
We provide safe, quality
food to the consumer.
We can be honest
and transparent because
there’s nothing to hide.”
Ravi Bathe, Agvocate
Poultry and Berry Producer
Learn more at AgMoreThanEver.ca.
Be somebody who does something.
Be an agvocate.
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 31
PLONK WINE From page 30
vineyards that had pulled out
their hybrid grapes
(remember “plonk” wine?) that
would not stand up to post-
NAFTA competition from
American vinifera wineries.
“We leased 500 acres of
land for just over what they
were paying in taxes and we
grew corn on it for our silage,”
recalls Bill. “We had to pull out
the wires and posts so we
could get equipment in to
work the land.”
“This is the best climate for
nishing beef in Canada,” he
points out. “The warm winters
support a high feed eciency
and the dry air keeps the
animal’s feet dry.”
By 2000, they had built up
an Angus brand to supply the
Pacic Northwest, with some
7500 cows in the pens.
“We were shipping animals
back and forth across the
border. At one point, 60% of
our cattle were from the US.
We would nish them here
and ship them back to the
states to be slaughtered. We
were grading 95% choice with
the genetics we were using.”
But BSE struck in 2003 and
overnight the border closed.
“We lost $2 million in two
weeks,” recalls Bill. “Some of
our loaded trucks were at the
border and we had to bring
them all back.”
Prices went from $1.20 to
25 cents a pound.
Cows sent to Alberta
“We had these fat cows we
were holding on to, hoping
the border would open again.
The local abattoir was taking
20 a week but with 2,000 cows
sitting here, that’s a lot of
weeks. We sent them to
Alberta.”
“We had to sell some of our
land,” Bill recalls. They planted
the vineyard and leased some
of the land to wineries.
“The return on grapes has
gone up steadily, but not for
beef,” Bill says.
They rebuilt the
“Okanagan’s Finest” brand
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about 1,000 head, and kept
three to four thousand over
the winter, but it was never
the same. Their ability to grow
feed was curtailed when the
local First Nation built a race
track on land they had
previously leased.
“The area is going to miss
our payroll. We employed at
least 12 people over the
winter months,” Bill points
out.
“I think there is a niche
market in BC for a locally-
nished specialty product,
such as hormone and anti-
biotic free,” he says. “There’s a
segment out there that wants
to buy it, but you would have
to have land.”
The feedlot lands will be
completely reclaimed and
Mission Hill will plant more
grapes. But the cattle legacy
will remain for a while longer
yet.
“We are composting the
bedding and manure mix left
behind by the cattle and
selling it to the vineyards,” he
says with an ironic chuckle. “It
will add organic matter to the
sandy soils.”
He’s moving on to ten acres
of land north of Oliver.
“I’ll still put up some hay
until I get tired of it,” Bill says.
In the tradition of retirement from the cattle sector, Bill Freding’s Southern Plus Feedlot was host to a
well-attended dispersal auction at the yard south of Oliver, September 10. (Tom Walker photo)
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD – A farmer’s
job is not just to feed the
world but to tell and teach
the world what he does, says
Abbotsford chicken and berry
grower Ravi Bathe, the past
president of the BC Chicken
Growers Association.
His family grows about
750,000 chickens annually
and has 150 acres of
raspberries and blueberries in
this province and another 225
acres of berries just across the
US border in Whatcom
County.
“This is our livelihood and
there’s too much at stake for
us not to be involved,” Bathe
says in explaining why he is
an “agvocate.” He denes that
as someone willing to
represent farming to the
general public and engage
them in discussion of it.
Initiated by Farm Credit
Canada, the program’s goal is
to retain and even increase
public trust in farmers and is
supported by most national
and regional agricultural
organizations.
“There’s a lot of
misconceptions out there and
we need to do a lot more to
tell everyone the true story,”
Bathe says, insisting being an
agvocate is very easy to do.
“Most people want to talk to a
farmer. Most would rather
hear from us than have
someone else tell them what
we do.”
He says there are countless
opportunities for farmers to
be agvocates – such as talking
to the waitress serving them
in a restaurant or the shopper
next to them in a
supermarket.
“If I see raspberries in
someone’s cart, I could tell
them the variety they have
and why it’s good. They leave
having more condence in
the product,” he explains.
Bathe’s involvement in the
Chicken Squad movie trailer is
a highlight of his own
agvocacy. He recalls watching
the trailer in a theatre and
having the person next to
him ask “was that you?”
Another time he was walking
down the street when a
stranger across the road
yelled out, “Hey! Chicken
squad!”
Both examples show the
Chicken Squad campaign is
“reaching people and they’re
remembering it.”
Agvocates aim to increase trust in farmers
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Country Life in BC • October 201632
by TOM WALKER
KAMLOOPS – You’ve heard
it before. “If god had wanted
me to walk, he wouldn’t have
created horses.” Well,
ranchers might not be ying
themselves but they may be
ying unmanned aerial
vehicles or drones across their
range, thanks to the work of
BC and Alberta researchers.
Dr. John Church of
Thompson Rivers University
(TRU) in Kamloops, in
partnership with Southern
Alberta Institute of
Technology (SAIT) and
Kingsclere Ranch in Golden,
has been awarded a $664,000
grant to continue his research
into using drones in the cattle
ranching industry.
“As Innovation Chair in
Cattle Industry Sustainability,
my job is to nd ways to help
ranchers save time and
money,” says Church. “If I can
help ranchers better manage
their two biggest assets –
their herd and their rangeland
– that will go a long way.”
“The idea came to me in
2013 watching some kids
ying a drone on campus.
The drone had a camera and
the kids could see what the
drone could see. I asked
myself, ‘How could we use
that in ranching?’”
The answer is that drones
can be used in a variety of
ways. The Natural Sciences
and Engineering Research
Council (NSERC) grant will
allow the group to expand
the drone techniques they
have been developing over
the last three years.
“The drone is simply an
aerial platform,” Church
points out. “When we put a
camera on that platform, we
can do a multitude of
common ranch work quickly
and from a central point.”
Church says ranchers can
easily use a drone to check
fence lines or irrigation
equipment.
Drone vs quad
“One of my student
researchers had a fun race
recently between a drone and
a quad to go to the end of the
eld and check a watering
trough,” Church chuckles. “At
sophisticated visual
equipment.
“With an infrared camera,
we can spot a cow’s heat
signal even when they are
under the forest canopy,” says
Church. The drone can
discriminate between a cow
and an operating water pump
which would also be giving
out heat.
“With GPS technology on
the drone, we can record the
exact location, transfer that to
a hand held unit and go out
and bring the cow home”
“If we have been checking
the herd with the infrared and
a cow doesn’t move through
the day, or the heat signal
drops, you’d better go out
and check if you have a
predator problem,” Church
says.
“We could also hover over
a feedlot and do the daily
count of the animals,” he
adds. “And we can take the
temperature of an individual
animal which will indicate its
overall health.”
Mapping rangelands
Dr. David Hill, associate
professor of geography at
TRU, is using the new infrared
technology to map
rangelands.
“The measurements from a
multi-spectral camera can
show the variation in
photosynthetic activity across
a forage crop for instance,”
says Hill. “We hope to be able
to connect that with
information on crop health,
irrigation needs and even
eventually nutrition content.
If we apply a treatment, we
can go back and see if it is
working. We also want to be
able to look at, say, the
carrying capacity of a eld or
monitor the spread of knap
weed across a pasture.”
Equipment check
A thermal infrared image of
a eld irrigated with a pivot
can indicate possible leaks.
Wet areas on the pivot path
will show up darker (wetter
soil is cooler) and show a
need to check the equipment.
Church’s collaboration with
SAIT involves their cutting
edge work with RFID tags that
all Canadian cattle must wear
for traceability. An antenna
on the drone can potentially
read a new passive tag from
SAIT up to 40 feet away.
“We hope that with active
tags that contain a solar chip
and a battery, we can extend
that distance further to three
to ve kilometers. Then we
can ID and locate a cow that’s
ill within the herd or feedlot.
Or go out and nd one on the
range.”
Church says, if they can link
the tags together through a
mesh network, if the drone
can nd one cow, they can
nd them all.
“I’m calling this precision
ranching. Precision
agriculture is going like re
on the prairies to manage the
crops,” Church points out.
“We are the rst group to go
after precision ranching. I
know this is the future.”
80 km an hour, the drone was
back at the operator’s feet
before the quad rider had
made it to the trough.”
Church has helped his
ranching partner, Je Braisher
at Kingsclere Ranch, use a
drone to herd up to 200 cow
calf pairs 10 kilometers.
“They don’t like the wind
that the props kick out,” he
explains. “And the drone can
go back and forth across the
eld so quickly, it can easily
nudge the stragglers along.
The ranch dogs might be
facing retirement.”
Line of sight regs
Even with the three
kilometer range allowed
under “line of sight”
regulations from Transport
Canada, drones can be used
to check on stock in less
accessible terrain.
“Some ranchers use
helicopters to go out and nd
those cows that don’t come
o the range in the fall, but
that can cost $1,500 an hour
so they can’t y for very long,”
Church says. “For $1,600, they
can buy a Phantom 4 drone at
Best Buy that comes with a
camera.”
Having an “eye in the sky”
to extend the producer’s
vision is one thing, Church
points out, but the real
expansion of the technology
comes when you add more
Drones, drones on the range
TRU awarded grant to further studies on drones and ranching
Thompson Rivers University Cattle Industry Sustainability chair Dr
John Church says drones equipped with cameras and new infrared
technology are going to at the forefront of what he calls “precision
ranching.” He and his partners have just received a sizeable grant
to build on the technology. (Tom Walker photo)
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 33
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ARMSTRONG With smaller
farms looking for smaller
animals and many consumers
looking for smaller cuts of
beef, Lowline cattle have
become more popular in
recent years. A smaller version
of the Angus breed, Lowlines
have been recognized as their
own breed and were the
feature breed at the 2016
Interior Provincial Exhibition
Open Beef Show.
Judge Dennis Ericson of
Alberta looked at 20 entries
before selecting two entries
from Big Island Lowlines of
Alberta as his grand champion
Lowlines. He chose Alta Piper
BIL 3A as the grand champion
female and Alta Grand Slam
BIL 22B as the grand
champion bull. Big Island also
won the junior female, heifer
calf, senior, junior and bull calf
championships. Silverhills
Lowline of Lumby earned all
the reserve female
championships while Melanie
and Sonja Guttner of Pink
Mountain took home the
reserve bull calf
championships.
Ericson was a busy man at
the IPE as he also judged the
Hereford and multi-breed
shows. The Herefords also
brought 20 entries into the
ring with Oakridge Farms in
Aldergrove and Copper Creek
Ranch in Princeton earning
the grand championship
banners. Oakridge took the
senior and female grand
championship with GH
Uptown Destiny 25A while
Copper Creek’s CCR 9500
Barcode 38B was selected as
the senior and grand
champion bull. Oakridge also
showed the champion and
reserve champion heifer
calves, reserve champion
yearling heifer, champion
junior bull and top breeders
herd. Copper Creek also
showed the reserve champion
junior bull. Smith Farms of
Abbotsford earned the
reserve senior and reserve
grand champion female and
champion yearling heifer
awards.
In the multi-breed show,
Ericson gave awards to three
breeds: Limousin, Gelbvieh
and Shorthorn. Pinnacle View
Limousin of Quesnel topped
the show, winning the grand
and senior female
championship with Pinnacle
Before He Cheats 23X and the
grand and junior bull
championship with Pinnacles
Crushin It 18C. Pinnacle View
also showed the champion
and reserve champion heifer
calves and the rst-place
breeders herd. Gelbviehs from
Alberta’s Keriness Cattle
Company received the awards
for reserve grand champion
bull, champion bull calf,
reserve senior champion
female, reserve champion
yearling heifer and reserve
champion yearling bull. Spady
Farms of Mission took the
reserve female grand
championship with their
champion Shorthorn yearling
heifer.
As usual, Angus was the
largest of the IPE’s individual
breed shows with 36 entries
coming into the show ring.
Judge Chad Wilson of Indiana
chose the champion yearling
heifer PM Tibble 75’15, shown
by Poplar Meadows of Topley
as his grand champion female
and the champion yearling
bull, Justamere South Dakota
833C, shown by Justamere
Ranch of Saskatchewan and
Still Meadows Ranch of
Alberta as his grand champion
bull.
Poplar Meadows also took
home the senior and reserve
grand female, reserve yearling
heifer and reserve heifer calf
championship banners while
Justamere/Still Meadows
added the reserve grand and
reserve bull calf
championships to their
collection. Shiloh Cattle
Company of Alberta took the
remaining championships:
reserve senior champion
female and champion and
reserve champion bull calf.
Wilson also judged the
Simmental show, the smallest
of the individual shows with
just 18 entries in the ring.
Earning the female grand
championship was LGW Ms
Designer Label, the senior
champion female shown by
Lorne Webster of Abbotsford.
Named the grand champion
bull was KRSS Red Desperado
4D, shown by KRS Simmentals
of Quesnel. Webster also
showed the reserve senior
champion female and reserve
champion bull. Other awards
went to Chad Valente of
Parson (yearling heifer) and
Ridgeline Cattle of
Saskatchewan (reserve
champion heifer calf).
Ericson and Wilson were
then joined by Kurtis Reid of
Saskatchewan to select the
supreme champions and
judge the special shows.
For the IPE’s supreme
champion female, the trio
selected GH Uptown Destiny,
Oakridge Farms’ champion
Hereford. Named the reserve
supreme champion female
was PM Tibbie 75’15, the
champion Angus female
shown by Poplar Meadows.
The Hereford and Angus
breeds also earned the
Lowlines emerge as winners at IPE beef show
supreme championships in
the bull classes but this time
the positions were reversed.
The supreme championship
went to the Angus bull,
Justamere South Dakota 833C,
shown by Justamere/Still
Meadows while the reserve
went to the champion
Hereford bull, CCR9500
Barcode 38B, shown by
Copper Creek.
The Angus breed also
produced the top sire of
tomorrow: Red Shiloh
Defender 6D, shown by Shiloh
Cattle; and the winner of the
three-year Stars of the Future
futurity class: Summit Angus
Eline 22B, shown by Sealin
Creek Ranch in Monte Lake.
In the jackpot heifer class,
the judging triumvirate chose
Nimmo Reid Chiquita 4C
shown by Spady Farms as the
champion and PM Tibbie
75’15 shown by Poplar
Meadows as the reserve
champion. In the jackpot steer
class, Hailey Erichuk of
Kamloops earned top honours
while the reserve award went
to Poplar Meadows.
Five-year-old Silverhills Razi was the judge’s choice as reserve champion female Lowline at this year’s IPE
Beef Show. Breeder Lauri Brundson of Lumby is joined by her husband, Kevin, holding the reserve
champion banner, and an Armstrong beef club member Clay, holds Razi’s 2016 heifer calf, Silverhills
Cazi. The rst Lowlines arrived in Canada in 1996 and in honour of their 20 year anniversary, IPE
recognized them as the feature breed of their beef show for the rst time this year. (Photo courtesy of
Silverhills Lowline Cattle)
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Country Life in BC • October 2016
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 35
In the western world,
religion, culture and feasts can
play a big part in family life,
prayers, habits and food. So,
too, it is with Muslims.
Word was out that high
demand slaughter sheep,
lambs and goats in the rst
two weeks of September was
going to result in good market
prices. Indeed, it did.
Fraser Valley Auction’s
Saturday market report for the
last three weeks of August
recorded no entries at all for
sheep, lambs or goats but
numbers going through the
yard (and their prices)
rocketed on the rst two
Saturdays of September as
Muslims prepared to celebrate
Eid al-Adha on September 13.
Total numbers going
through the sale ring were not
published but guesstimates
had about 800 head of sheep
and goats going through the
ring on September 3 with
many more again on
September 10. A full liner load
of some 400 head came down
from Dawson Creek. The
impression was of hundreds of
both species going through
the ring, six to 15 head a time.
Each pen was sold within
minutes with the next group
ready to enter the sales ring
immediately after the sold lot
had left.
I was told at the sale on
September 3, Meadow Valley
Meats, just one abattoir in the
valley, would be
slaughtering sheep and
goats all day, every day
until the festival.
Rams sold between
$200.00 and $290.00
per head on September
3. Ewes garnered $100.00 to
$180.00 while lambs reached
$90.00 to $330.00. Prices the
following weekend were
similar.
The goat sale was much the
same with mature billies
getting the lion’s share at
$120.00 to $450.00 per head.
Nannies sold for $90.00 to
$270.00, and kids from $40.00
to $110.00. Larger and
stronger-looking animals took
the higher prices. Llamas and
alpacas were selling for a
premium, too.
My husband, David,
brought four ewes whose time
had come to Meadow Valley at
6:30 am on September 12. He
conrmed the impression of
unusually large numbers. He
was told by a worker they
would be slaughtering from
early morning to midnight.
Cultural holiday creates
demand, good prices
for sheep and goats
The visible pens were full.
There is another fair-sized barn
nearby and he noticed about
eight to 10 white, large
marquees in two rows outside,
again all lled.
Dan Sandys, from Salmon
Arm, said the area was
spotlessly clean in accordance
with Muslim teachings. The
animals were clean and kept
on clean, dry bedding with
good hay and clean water, and
he added there was a lot of
“high tech stu around.”
Wool Gatherings
JO SLEIGH
Please see “FEAST” page 36
Shea-Lynn Seaman’s 2016 grand champion market lamb project caught the fancy of the Pacic
National Exhibition, represented by agriculture manager Christie Kerr and Kalyn Van Horne ,
who paid $7.75 per pound (or $1038.50) during the annual 4-H livestock auction, August 22.
Shea-Lynn hails from the Langley Lamb and Woolcraft 4-H Club. It’s been a good time to market
lambs. Prices were up across the board, driven in part by the Muslim celebration of Eid al-Adha
in mid-September. (Photo courtesy of the PNE)
Wilf Smith
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Country Life in BC • October 201636
FEAST OF SACRIFICE From page 35
by EMILY BULMER
SMITHERS – It was a great
summer of pulling for Curtis
Adamson, an up-and-coming
teamster from Smithers.
Taking rst place at the
Bulkley Valley Exhibition, he
says, “It was exciting to win in
Smithers – its fun because
family is involved. My sister
was helping me out and there
was lots of family in the
crowd.”
In addition to his
hometown win, Adamson also
brought back the Grand
Champion title (middle
weight division) from the
Calgary Stampede this
summer for a 63-inch pull at
12,000 pounds.
“It was a big show so it was
pretty exciting,” he says. He
has had his team of Belgians,
Nip and Doc, together for two
years.
“I work them about six days
a week, for three hours a day.
A lot of time and feed goes
into them.”
An older mans sport
Adamson has been pulling
for about six years, and
entered the competitive
arena three years ago. When
asked about what it’s like to
be one of the younger
competitors, he says, “It is
denitely an older man's
sport – there’s not a lot of
young people. It’s good to
learn lots, and there are lots
of people to look up to.”
Adamson is currently back
at university working on an
engineering degree so the
horses take the winter o at
his parents’ farm in rural
Smithers. He plans to start
training again in the spring.
Hometown win for
Smithers teamster
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD The last best
hope to halt construction of
the Site C power project lies
with the federal courts after
the BC Court of Appeal
dismissed a request by the
Peace Valley Landowners’
Association to overturn
approval of the project.
Lawyers for the landowners’
association argued that four of
the recommendations laid out
by the joint federal-provincial
review panel that examined
the project were ignored when
the project received approval.
However, the justices
considering the appeal
countered that the
recommendations had
nothing to do with the
environmental assessment of
the project, and were therefore
immaterial to its approval.
While the Peace Valley
Landowners Association is
discussing next steps with its
lawyers, the Federal Court of
Appeal is considering a request
from the Treaty 8 First Nations
to have the dam stopped.
Stewart Phillip, president of
the Union of BC Indian Chiefs,
has lent his support to the
cause and in September, the
Assembly of First Nations
stepped up with its own
support.
First Nations received a
hearing in federal court on
September 13 and are now
awaiting a decision. There’s no
timeline for the response but
opponents of the project are
hoping it comes before the
dam reaches a point of no-
return – something BC Premier
Christy Clark has pledged to
achieve before the provincial
election in May 2017.
The reservoir associated
with the Site C dam will ood –
depending on who’s talking –
as little as 7,413 acres or as
many as 31,528 acres along 83
kilometres of the Peace River.
Courts consider Site C criticisms
Curtis Adamson (far right) assisted by Oren Rosler (left) guides his team of Belgians, Nip (left) and Doc
(right), to a rst place nish at the Bulkley Valley Exhibition, August 28. (Emily Bulmer photo)
The background for this
demand is rooted in religion
and culture.
Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of
Sacrice, commemorates the
prophet Abraham's
willingness to obey Allah by
sacricing his son, Ishmael.
According to the Koran, he
was commanded by Allah to
take his son to a certain place
and sacrice him. Just before
Abraham sacriced his son,
Allah replaced Ishmael with a
ram, thus sparing his life.
The festival is celebrated
by sacricing a ram, lamb or
other animal and distributing
the meat in equal parts to
relatives, friends and the
poor. The sacrice
symbolizes obedience to
Allah, and its distribution to
others is an expression of
generosity, one of the ve
pillars of Islam.
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 37
by TOM WALKER
KELOWNA – Robyn King
jokes that her husband,
Richard, really wanted a new
challenge when he switched
their 13 acre apple and peach
orchard to organic certication
starting in 2007.
“Sometimes I don’t do so
well at that challenge,” he
quips back.
Richard started moving in
the organic direction when he
became involved in early trials
with Sterile Insect Release (SIR)
technology for codling moth
control in the Okanagan in the
early 1990’s. There was a steep
learning curve over the two
years to qualify for organic
status, Richard told a recent BC
Agrologists eld trip to Bite Me
Organics farm in southeast
Kelowna. Still, he sees a lot of
advantages to being an
organic farmer.
“I never really liked the
chemicals I used in
conventional production,”
Richard says. “I still spray, but
it’s with organic materials,
which are much more benign.”
He thinks it is much better
for the environment.
“I notice we have a lot more
birds around than we used to,
particularly raptors.” He has
been working to re-introduce
American Kestrels to control
the starlings that prey on soft
fruit.
The economics are much
better for both retail and
wholesale sales, Richard
explains.
“The organic market is still
very undersupplied.”
Bite Me Organics sells to
organic retailers in Kelowna,
Choices and Natures Fare, and
supplies a local organic
delivery service.
They make about 10 visits
each summer to the Kelowna
Farmers Market.
“It’s a long day,” says Robyn.
“But it is lucrative. And it draws
customers up to the barn for
direct sales that are often
larger orders.”
Families will come out and
bring their children.
“We can get 100 people
here on a Saturday,” says
Robyn. Visitors may also cut
owers from the house
garden.
“We have three distinct
groups on our 350 member
email list,” says Robyn. “We
have the young professionals
who can aord it and want
their children to eat
organically, we have folks who
have cancer and we have
Europeans.”
Richard says there are also
downsides to growing
organically.
“One of the problems is that
during the two years for
certication, you must use
organic methods, but you
cannot sell for the organic
premium to recoup the extra
costs.”
And there’s more record
keeping.
“I’ve started a computer
diary to record at the end of
the day.”
“A major problem is the
alternate bearing years that
occur in the apple orchard,”
Richard says. There aren’t
adequate materials for
chemical thinning and it’s just
not practical to do it by hand,
he explains.
“So our production can
really vary from year to year.”
But this summer was an
excellent year for soft fruit, he
says.
“We couldn’t keep up with
the picking. We got over
30,000 pounds of peaches
from our acre and a half and
1200 pounds from our 25
young nectarine trees.”
They grow Ambrosia, Pink
Lady, Fuji, Jonagold, Aurora,
Golden Gala and Honeycrisp
apples on 10 acres. About one
third is sold direct and to local
retail while two thirds is
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“We grow some Sunrise for
early local sales and I nd that
we are picking about a week
ahead of our neighbours,” he
explains. “The local market
wants rm, crisp and avorful
apples, but they aren’t as
concerned about colour.”
Fujis that are headed to
China, on the other hand, are
left to color up and even have
“extenday” plastic ground
covers beneath the trees to
reect back the sunlight and
ripen the fruit more evenly.
“Honeycrisp are the hardest
apples to grow,” Richard says.
They are not strong trees, they
have thin skin and are
susceptible to bitter pit.
“You don’t always see it on
the fruit when you pick it, but
it shows up later when they’ve
been in cold storage.” Still,
they are hugely popular and
give the best returns for the
grower.
Richard has ve California
varieties of peaches such as
Oh Henry and Miranda and, so
far, they have been winter
hardy.
“I’m betting on climate
change,” he jokes.
“The SIR program is very
eective for codling moths,”
says Richard. He nds organic
sprays are good for leaf roller
and mating disruption works
for root borer, but he still has
to go through with a coat
hanger and dig out the grubs.
He tried chicken manure for
fertilizer, “but its not very
popular with your family or
your neighbours,” and it
burned a number of trees that
have not recovered. He likes
the pelletized feather meal he
is using now.
And the name?
“It was one of those crazy
ideas that came out of sitting
around with friends and a
glass of wine,” recalls Robyn.
“People remember it.”
Bite Me Organics’ Richard King shows o a box of organically-grown peaches to a group of
agrologists who toured his orchard earlier this summer. Although it requires extra work, King says the
personal satisfaction and nancial premiums make it all worthwhile. (Tom Walker photo)
Country Life in BC • October 201638
by TAMARA LEIGH
PEMBERTON – The
Pemberton Valley may be best
known for its potatoes, but
farming in the area is quickly
diversifying to serve new
markets. The idyllic setting and
fertile soil is increasingly being
recognized for its agricultural
potential and improvements
to the Sea to Sky highway
have made the three-million
person market to the south all
that much more accessible.
“The valley is still primarily a
seed potato growing area, but
there’s a lot more going on.
Agri-tourism is a big deal, and
our organic industry is
growing as well,” says Anna
Helmer, president of the
Pemberton Farmers’ Institute.
“We are seeing trends towards
community supported
agriculture (CSA), mixed
vegetables, market vegetables,
berries and hops. It’s generally
on smaller acreages and really
labour intensive work.”
For decades, the Pemberton
Valley’s claim to fame came
from their virus and disease-
free status, but as tissue
culture has become the
standard for propagation, the
markets are changing.
Speaking to the board of the
Investment Agriculture
Foundation during their
annual regional tour in June,
elite seed potato grower John
Beks of Shaw Creek Farm
explained the impact on the
sector.
“For quite a few years,
Pemberton was the only place
that had virus-free and
disease-free status and it was
lucrative because people were
after our stu, so we
were selling a lot more
product and had more
seed growers,” says
Beks who is vice-
president of the BC
Certied Seed Potato
Association. “We were selling
to Alberta, Saskatchewan.
They are now doing what
we’re doing, so our market has
dwindled a little bit over the
years.”
In recent years, the BC
Certied Seed Potato
Association has secured
funding to help increase
awareness of the seed potato
industry locally through the
Government of British
Columbia’s Buy Local program
and internationally through
the Canada-BC Agrifoods
Export program funding by
Growing Forward 2.
Many of the older seed
potato growers are retiring
and the math doesn’t add up
for the next generation to stay
in business.
“To make a living growing
seed potatoes, you have to be
growing around 70 acres per
year and we’re mandated to
have a three year rotation.
That means you have to have
access to 200 acres to grow
potatoes and it’s tough to put
together,” explains Anna
Helmer, who grows organic
table potatoes. “It’s hard to
imagine paying $5 million for
your 200-acre farm, buying all
this equipment and then
selling your potatoes for 20
cents per pound.”
Helmer is the fourth
generation to take over her
family’s farm, Helmer Organics.
With a focus on farmers’
markets in Vancouver, she gets
an average price of $2 per
pound and grows seven acres
of potatoes instead of 70. The
opportunities go far beyond
farmers’ markets.
“Almost every restaurant in
Whistler has a Pemberton
potato and there’s a market
waiting to be lled by a wash
and pack product with a
Pemberton name attached to
it,” she says. “I think it’s
something about the soil we
have here that produces a
better tasting potato.”
Closer to home, Pemberton
Distillery has developed
ongoing local demand for
potatoes. The company
sources 40,000 tonnes of
Pemberton organic potatoes
The changing face of farming in Pemberton
each year to produce their
trademark vodka.
Beyond potatoes, local
businesses like Whistler-based
Caveman Grocer are looking
for reliable suppliers of local
meat and produce to meet the
growing demand. The
company delivers fresh and
frozen prepared paleo meals
to customers throughout
Vancouver and the Lower
Mainland and has recently
launched a food truck in
Whistler.
“Everything that we provide
is locally sourced, free-range,
pasture-raised meats,” says
Kara McMaster, co-founder of
Caveman Grocer. “We have a
new relationship with a farm in
Pemberton called Laughing
Crow Organics and we’ve
worked pretty closely with
them over the last year to
make sure they can keep up
with our demand.”
One of the biggest
challenges for Pemberton, as
with other regions of BC, is
keeping farmland in
production. The Pemberton
Farmers’ Institute is actively
promoting the value of
agriculture to the local
economy, as well as in
ensuring the availability of
locally-produced food in the
future.
“Farming is a really
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Pemberton seed potato grower John Beks explains tissue culture
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WHISTLER – BC farmers
markets are playing an
increasing role in helping
producers grow their
businesses. The Whistler
Farmers Market is one such
market that is having
exceptional results for a variety
of vendors – from artisan
crafters to food crafters and
producers.
“The role of farmers markets
providing the access and
promoting the availability of
locally produced goods is a
little underrated,” Whistler
Farmers Market manager
Christopher Quinlan told the
Investment Agriculture
Foundation (IAF) board during
a tour of the area earlier this
year. The Whistler market
exploded after it began 22
years back with “three hippies
with some veggies, a tent and
the occasional jeweler.”
There are 18 Sunday
markets in its season with a
high season beginning in July.
It is one of BC’s larger farmers
markets, hosting up to 94
vendors and sprawls through
the pedestrian village of
Whistler Blackcomb. Potential
important diversied part of a
diversied economy and local
government is starting to
realize that as the ups and
downs of the Whistler
economy come home to roost
here, and we still
have farmers
going strong
and more
farmers coming
in when they
can. It’s pretty
obvious that
farming is a
good way to
diversify,” says
Helmer.
Prices rising
While land
prices are still
signicantly
lower than the Fraser Valley
(about $15,000 per acre), they
are still rising as more people
discover the spectacular
landscape and recreational
opportunities of the area.
“Land prices are increasing;
it seems like even in the last
couple of months, the bubble
has been developing and
those values are being set by
factors other than what they
can produce,” says Helmer.
“I know it’s a Shangri-la and
people want to be here. I
played a big role in bringing
them here in the rst place to
see how
beautiful it is,”
she says,
referring to her
role in starting
the Pemberton
Slow Food Cycle
Tour. “I guess
my hope is
when people
come here,
they’ll say ‘Oh
man, I really
wish my food
came from
here.’”
“Then when
and if food gets too expensive
from other places, they’ll turn
to Pemberton and say ‘okay,
we’re ready for all that
amazing food.’ When that
happens I hope we still have
enough people growing
mixed vegetables and all the
other amazing things that can
grow here so there is more to
oer than just seed potatoes.”
Whistler farmers’ market supports local growers
venders go through a juried
application process and this
past year they had 172
applicants.
In high season, Whistler
grows from a population
average of 10,000 to 55,000.
During this time, the market
averages 5,000 to 7,000 people
per day.
“It provides a phenomenal
point of touch for all of our
farmers who provide their
produce to locals,” says
Quinlan.
As a major tourist
destination, the market
provides an opportunity for
small vendors to showcase
their products with customers
from all over the world.
Consumers have an
opportunity to speak with
producers, try their products
and give instant feedback – a
valuable tool for producers as
they develop and rene their
oerings.
Outgrown the market
A signicant number of
local businesses have grown
out of the Whistler Farmers
Market, including Nonna Pia’s
Gourmet, an award-winning
producer of balsamic
reductions. Their business
began by bringing 1,000
bottles to a Christmas market,
recounts co-founder chef
Norm Strim, who started the
company with his wife,
Natasha, and a bit of help from
their children, Georgia and
Oliver.
“Everyone else had backlit
booths and we had a little sign
that my four year-old made
with a little Italian ag and one
light shining on it, and we
thought ‘Oh no, we’re gonna
get killed.’”
From there, they grew their
business at the market and in
2014, they made an exciting
appearance on CBC’s Dragons’
Den and were partnered with
by Dave Chilton. This year,
Nonna Pia’s produced almost
700,000 bottles of product,
and next year they plan to
produce one million bottles.
Chef Norm credits the support
of the BC Buy Local program
with helping expand their
retail presence in Canada. They
have also received support
from the Canada-BC Agrifoods
Export program delivered by
the IAF to assist with their
upcoming expansion into the
US.
The Whistler village
community is able to rally
around its local producers
while giving them a huge
boost with chefs buying
produce sold at the market
and showcasing it on
restaurant menus including
the Four Seasons Resort and
Fairmont Chateau Whistler.
“Farmers markets are a
phenomenon sweeping across
BC. New businesses get into
farmers markets to get the
exposure and to get that one-
on-one touch with their
customers to help develop
their product and really build
their business plan,” asserts
Quinlan. “98% of the vendors
that come to farmers markets
are at that level to build
business and promote
products.”
DIVERSITY IN FARMING From page 38
Anna Helmer
The Whistler Farmers Market has a waiting list of applicants
hoping to cash in on local and tourist dollars. (Photo courtesy of
Whistler Farmers Market)
Here come the bandidos!
Shelby Edwards, 11, and her 4-H llama project, Stirling, took rst place in a competitive
costume class at this year’s IPE in Armstrong. Shelby is a second year member in the Armstrong
4-H Multi Club where she and club members have been practicing showmanship with their
llamas and getting in a little creative time putting together their costumes. Coee, anyone?
(Cathy Glover photo)
Country Life in BC • October 201640
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Your Farm. Your Family. Your Future.
Someone recently posted
this pithy saying on Facebook:
“You’re not rich until you have
something that money can’t
buy.” It got me thinking about
another unknown factor (to
me, at least) in the matter of
the pursuit of wealth. I found
it shocking.
Like me, I’m sure you’ve
received dozens of
notications over the years
informing that you are eligible
to cash in on millions of
dollars. Between the deaths of
untold numbers of military
men, as well as beloved
fathers, uncles and who-
knows-who-else, the number
of dollars I would have
received by responding to
these spam emails exceeds
my ability to imagine, let
alone count. Why, just this
morning, I was informed in
two separate emails that I was
eligible for an inheritance of
$100 million; additionally, my
name had been drawn in a
lottery I didn’t even enter and
I could collect my luxury
automobile if I would simply
supply personal information
to these fraudsters who want
me to believe they have my
best interests at heart. Just
think, I would be able to
spend lavishly for the rest of
my life.
On a sadder note, I’ve
heard of many people who
are snared in these traps.
When lonely or perhaps
desperate (or greedy) enough
to believe the spiel they’ve
received, they are caught in
the net of deceit.
A study by the
Financial Fraud
Research Center at
Stanford University’s
Center on Longevity
estimates that
somewhere around 30 million
Americans (not counting
Canadians!) are sucked into
nancial fraud estimated at
$40 to $50 billion annually.
Even more surprising, to me at
least, is that victims include
older people, yes, but also
younger ones. Educated and
undereducated. White-collar
and blue-collar. Dumb people
and smart ones. Check out
this website, along with
related sites:
[http://longevity3.stanford.ed
u/blog/2012/11/19/scams-
schemes-and-swindles-a-
review-of-consumer-nancial-
fraud-research/].
As I said, I found this
information shocking,
especially since these
schemes are not limited to
the Internet. It also got me
thinking about the matter of
genuine riches. Drawing upon
the years I spent living in rural
BC and Saskatchewan, I’ve
come to a few general
conclusions: rst, farming or
ranching isn’t the money bag
that some people think. Yes,
there has to be some net gain
as they both demand a total
commitment to hard work
and hefty expenses. Next,
hard work and nancial
investment alone don’t
guarantee monetary success;
there’s the matter of weather
conditions and global
demand, just to name a
couple of factors. For the
farmers I know, genuine
riches came from their love of
the land and of what they do
and for the majority, those
riches also include love of
family, friends and
community. I’ve never
farmed, although I certainly
continue to grow a lot of our
food on our property, and I
can attest to the fact that
potatoes dug from the
backyard soil seem to provide
an extra measure of
enjoyment.
As we celebrate
Thanksgiving Day this year,
once more may our thoughts
be centred on the good things
we share in this land. No,
things are not always as we’d
like or even as they should be
and yes, governments
sometimes seem to be
anything but attuned to
current needs but, all in all, we
are privileged to live in the
true north strong and free. It’s
a place where genuine riches
are more easily harvested than
in a lot of places on this
planet.
PS: A word to the
fraudsters: if you would spend
some of that impressive
wealth learning to spell and
use good grammar, you
wouldn’t turn me o so
quickly. (Mind you, I still
wouldn’t respond, but I’d be
more impressed with your
eorts.)
A Wannabe Farmer
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October 2016 • Country Life in BC 41
When we left o last time,
Henderson got his
comeuppance when he realized
that Janice would be his new
boss. While Henderson’s world
seemed to be crashing, Deborah
and Doug McLeod began
rehearsing for the spring
musical. Rural Redemption (part
77) continues ...
The spring musical was o
to the races. Once word
spread that the rehearsals had
begun, a steady stream of
willing – or mildly coerced –
participants started signing
on. Gladdie auditioned and
appraised the talent and
wrestled with scene selection.
There were musical rehearsals
in Jade Song’s music room
nearly every afternoon but
there was no sign of the rst
stage rehearsal. Doug McLeod
dropped by to see Edna
Fitzpatrick.
“Have you been seen
Gladdie lately? I’m a little
worried that this musical is
going to overwhelm her.”
Edna nodded.
“I’m glad you dropped by. I
was going to give you a call.
She looked completely worn
out when I stopped in to see
her on Tuesday. She’s got her
heart set on doing this but I
don’t know if she’s really up to
taking on so much of it.”
“I’ve got the same feeling.
Do you think she might be
willing to let go of some of it?”
“Maybe. Leave it with me
for a day or two. I might know
someone who would help if
they were asked.”
Coffee?
As soon as Doug was gone,
Edna picked up the phone.
“Val? This is Edna
Fitzpatrick. I wonder if I might
take you up on that cup of
coee you oered me?”
Half an hour later, Edna
pulled into Valentine and
Arnold Zimmer’s driveway.
The Zimmer’s had purchased
four acres of the old Strand
place almost three years ago
but hadn’t moved in until
their new house was nished
six months ago. Tyler Koski
designed it and had overseen
the construction. Edna was
curious to see just what he
had come up with. The house
was modest and unobtrusive
and blended quietly into the
landscape at the end of the
Strand’s old orchard – so
unlike many of the garish
monstrosities that had sprung
up on other places that had
been sold to newcomers.
Sparks begin to fly with the L’il Abner rehearsals
Inside, it was lovely: big
windows in the right place to
let in the view and sunlight,
stunning woodwork cut from
beams re-cycled from one of
the old buildings that was
beyond salvation, and no
more walls than bedroom and
bathroom modesty
demanded.
High school drama
Edna rst met Val at the
mailboxes in the store a
couple of weeks before
Christmas. She’d struck up a
conversation and learned that
Arnold Zimmer was a retired
physics professor and
Val had spent more
than 20 years teaching
high school drama
classes. The
conversation ended
with an invitation to
come by for coee, take a look
at the house and meet Arnie.
After a tour of the house, the
subject of Gladdie and the
spring musical was broached.
“I’ve been dying to see your
house but I have to confess
another motive for coming
by.”
Edna told them about the
spring musicals of the past
and how they had dwindled
and how Gladdie wanted to
mount one last production as
a tribute to all of those that
had gone before, and that it
was going to be dedicated to
the memory of their old
friend, Cec Montgomery. She
told them that Gladdie’s
friends were worried about
her and she remembered that
Val had been a drama teacher
and wondered if she might be
interested in shouldering
some of the directing?
“I’d love to. What is the
musical?”
“Lil Abner.”
“Oh, Lil Abner is such fun.
I’ve done it twice before with
the school. What exactly do
you need?”
It was quickly determined
that, Gladdie willing, Val
Zimmer would become
co-director of the spring
musical and take over the
stage direction.”
“I’ll even throw in Arnie if
you still need a Marry’n Sam
or an Evil Eyed Fleagle.”
Arnold Zimmer protested.
“Hush, Arnold. It will be
good for you. You’ll have a
chance to meet our
neighbours and it will get
your nose out of your books
for a while.”
Val Zimmer spent two
hours with Gladdie the
following morning. By mid-
afternoon, Gladdie had
requested all concerned to
welcome their new neighbour
and stage director.
First rehearsal
Valentine Zimmer leapt
quickly and decisively into the
breech. Two days later, she
started stage rehearsals. She
spoke to Jade, who said that
Daisy and Abner were the
most musically ready. She
scheduled their rst rehearsal
for the same evening.
Deborah and Doug met Val
at the community hall at 7:30.
Ready to sing
“I know this is short notice
but I wanted to get started as
soon as possible. Time always
runs out at the other end so
anything we can look after
now makes it easier on all of
us in the long run. Jade tells
me that you are both ready to
sing so I’d like to run through
the stage blocking for the
numbers you are doing
together. There are no sets yet
so I’ll mark your spots with
chalk. Jade has given me a
download of the music.”
Five minutes later, Deborah
and Doug sang Mainly You.
Val sat with her mouth
open and her eyebrows
raised.
“That was incredible! There
is so much chemistry in your
voices. So much potential. But
you can’t sing a love song like
this when you are three feet
apart and not even looking at
one another. Deborah, I want
you to stand right in front of
Abner right here on this
mark.”
She chalked an X on the
stage less than a foot in front
from Abner’s mark.
“Move to this spot and look
up into his eyes while you
sing,” she said. “Abner, you
only have eyes for Daisy. Take
her hands while you’re
singing and hold them
between you.”
They repeated the number.
“So much better, but you
are still not committing to the
full potential. You are in love
and you are saying so. You are
committing to each other;
take full advantage of that
passion. Let’s try it again but
this time, just at the end, lets
have Daisy lay her cheek on
Abner’s chest and Abner put
his arms around her.”
Conflicted emotions
Both Deborah and Doug
were in a ux of conicted
emotions. Doug was still
holding her hands and they
were looking into one
another’s eyes.
“Do you think we can
manage this one more time?”
Doug asked in a whisper.
Deborah swallowed
dicultly and blew the breath
from her lungs.
“In for a penny, in for a
pound.”
Val re-started the music and
they sang it again. At the end,
Daisy laid her cheek on
Abner’s chest and he wrapped
his right arm around her. Then
lifted her chin with his left
hand, stared briey into her
eyes and they kissed.
“Bravo!” shouted Val.
“Brava! What emotion! What
passion! Everyone will see that
you are in love! That was
perfect.”
To be continued ...
www.islandtractors.com
USED EQUIPMENT
NH 1037 BALE WAGON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500
CASE 8630 BALE WRAPPER, 2001, SELF-CONTAINED HYD PACK 7,500
N/H BR740A ROUND BALER, 2007, SILAGE SPEC, TWINE ONLY 20,000
JOHN DEERE 925 MOWER CONDITIONER 9’ 9” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,000
USED TRACTORS
KUBOTA B1700 700 HRS, LOADER, FORKS, SPRAYER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,300
KUBOTA MX5100 2WD, LOADER, CANOPY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24,000
NEW INVENTORY
NH T5.115 CAB, MFWD, LOADER READY, 24X24 TRANS . . . . . . 75,000
NH H7320 9’ 2” DISCBINE (ONE LEFT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000
NH BR7060 CROP CUTTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45,000
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CONSTRUCTION
KX057 CAB, STEEL TRACKS, 2 BUCKETS, THUMB, 1500HRS . . . . 57,900
N/H LB75B 4-IN-1, 4WD, EXTENDA-HOE, THUMB, PLUMBED,
2 BUCKETS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43,250
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The Woodshed
Chronicles
BOB COLLINS
Country Life in BC • October 201642
Mexi week
Eat now or freeze for later: enchilada pie. (Judie Steeves photo)
Enchilada Pie
If your family gets bored with all the regular fare now that
you’re back in the school routine, try setting aside dierent
weeks to feature food from another country, like Mexico. You
could even wear that old sombrero or pancho to the table ... or
maybe not.
To me, these dishes are a comfort food because they always
remind me of fall and winter, but actually they’d probably be
just ne in summer as well.
They are both great dishes for planning meals from which
there will be leftovers because both re-heat well. You can easily
freeze portions of the Enchilada Pie to serve later, or the whole
thing; and you can freeze extra portions of the meat lling for
the tacos and serve it up
as an after-school snack,
lunch or dinner at
another time.
With meals like these,
you can prepare them
ahead on the weekend, if
you’re not working on
weekends and have more time, then you’re all set for the week
ahead. Just thaw and re-heat when everyone’s on the run.
Since this is turkey month, why not try making tacos using
the seasoning mix recipe with chopped-up leftover turkey
instead of lean ground beef – just re-heating instead of
cooking? You could substitute ground chicken or turkey for the
beef in the pie as well.
It’s always a challenge to come up with dierent, nutritious
meals that everyone in the family will eat for every day of the
week. But take inspiration from other cultures to bring some
new avours into the regular routine and perk up some palates.
Stir-fried dishes are terric because they incorporate so many
crispy, colourful vegetables along with a little meat in a single
dish. Just pick up a few bottled sauces to add a spoonful at the
end for avour.
Italian pasta sauces are also fun because you can serve them
so many ways: over chicken and penne pasta; meatballs and
spaghetti; ground veal patties with mozzarella; on ravioli or
other stued pastas; or on a pizza. Try using a whole wheat
tortilla or pita bread instead of a thick pizza crust if you’re trying
to reduce the bread in your diet. They’re crisp and delicious.
Whatever you try in the way of new avours, have an
outdoorsy October and enjoy the colours of the turning leaves
on a walk or hike, working up an appetite for a good dinner.
Happy Thanksgiving.
This is delicious and makes an excellent make-ahead dish to freeze for quick dinners at
another time. I divided one into several servings and froze them separately. It can be made as
spicy as you like, by varying the amounts of dierent ingredients or the heat of the salsa. You
could add a simple salad on the side.
1 onion 1 lb. (454 g) lean ground beef 1 tsp. (5 ml) chili powder
1 garlic clove 10.6 oz. (300 g) pkg. frozen spinach 1 1/2 tsp. (7 ml) salt
2 tomatoes or 14 oz. (398 ml) can black beans 1 1/2 c. (375 ml) salsa
7 oz. (213 ml) tomato sauce 1 tbsp. (15 ml) lime juice 7 large whole wheat tortillas
half a green pepper 1 tsp. (5 ml) cumin
half a red pepper 1 tsp. (5 ml) coriander
Chop onions (or you may substitute leeks) and mince garlic. Chop tomatoes and peppers.
Brown beef, onions and garlic over medium heat in a large frypan.
Add thawed spinach, rinsed black beans, peppers, lime juice, spices and sauce. Cook 15
minutes or so. Pre-heat oven to 350 F. Cover the bottom of a 9” x 13” pan with tortillas and let
them lap over the pan sides. Top with the beef mixture.
Fold the tortillas from the bottom layer over the mixture and top with more tortillas, if needed,
to totally enclose the casserole.
Top with a similar-sized pan or other weight to keep the tortillas from curling up as they bake.
Bake 30 minutes or until bubbling.
Serve hot or let cool completely, cut into serving pieces, wrap in foil and freeze. To serve, you
may embellish by topping with salsa and sour cream or Greek style yogurt, and garnishing with
cilantro. Serves 8 or so.
Made this way, you aren’t serving your family unpronounceable avourings and extra sugar.
These tacos are made easily and quickly from scratch using simple ingredients. They’re kind of
like a spicy cheeseburger served in a whole grain soft taco, instead of a big bun. Quite a healthy,
simple meal.
Taco Seasoning:
Simply quadruple all the ingredients for a larger batch and store the extra in a jar in the
cupboard. Then it’s quick and easy to spoon out two tablespoons or so for each pound of lean
ground meat when you feel like a hit of Mexican.
1 tbsp. (15 ml) chili powder 1 tsp. (5 ml) sea salt 1/4 tsp. (1 ml) cayenne pepper
1 1/2 tsp. (8 ml) cumin powder 1 tsp. (5 ml) ground pepper 1/4 tsp. (1 ml) crushed red pepper akes
1 tsp. (5 ml) dried oregano 1/2 tsp. (2 ml) paprika
Combine all the spices and store in an airtight container. Vary the amounts of chili powder,
black pepper, cayenne and red pepper akes to your family’s taste for heat.
Meat Mixture:
1 onion drizzle of oil 1 tbsp. (15 ml) tomato paste
1 garlic clove 1 lb. (454 g) lean ground beef 2 tbsp. (30 ml) taco seasoning
Chop onion and mince garlic. In a medium-sized frypan over medium-high heat, drizzle oil
and soften the onion.
Add lean ground beef and brown, turning the heat down if it seems to be cooking too fast.
Add the garlic, tomato paste and taco seasoning and cook on a lower heat for a few minutes,
stirring occasionally.
Chopped tomato Chopped lettuce Grated old cheddar cheese Whole wheat tortillas
Oer the meat mixture, tomato, lettuce and cheddar separately with the tortillas at the table,
so everyone can place a dollop of the meat mixture on a tortilla, topped by the cheddar, tomato
and lettuce and roll up the tortilla, tucking in the bottom rst. Serves 2-4.
Jude’s Kitchen
JUDIE STEEVES
Please mail to
36 Dale Road, Enderby, BC V0E 1V4
604-328-3814
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RONDA PAYNE PHOTO
October 2016 • Country Life in BC 43
by DAVID SCHMIDT
LANGLEY
Farmers and
their friends in the agriculture
sector seem to spend a lot of
their summer on local golf
courses. So it’s no surprise that
agricultural associations have
decided to put that interest to
good use by having them tee
o for charity.
The granddaddy of
charitable golf tournaments is
the annual BC Turkey and Egg
Golf Tournament. Organized
by the BC Turkey Association
(BCTA) and the Fraser Valley
Egg Producers Association.
The 13th annual event was
held September 7 at
Newlands Golf Course in
Langley and brought out close
to 150 golfers and many more
farmers and industry reps to
the dinner and auction which
followed the tournament.
The tournament is a win-
win for all involved. The
proceeds are donated to the
Union Gospel Missions in
Vancouver’s Downtown
Eastside and in Mission. In
turn, UGM uses the money to
buy turkey and eggs for their
meal programs, which
supports the very producers
who support them.
UGM representatives
Steven Fike and Nicole
Robson were on hand to assist
with the tournament, selling
“eggs” with a potential prize
payo of a $1,500 ight with
Westjet. Fike also provided his
testimony during the dinner,
describing how the meal
program brought him into
UGM, which eventually turned
Farmers tee off for charity
his life around from a life of
drug addiction and crime.
This year’s turkey and egg
auction raised over $57,000
for the UGM.
“This is the best we’ve done
yet,” reported BCTA manager
Susan Mallory.
A couple of other
tournaments are now
following in the turkey and
egg tournament’s footsteps.
A few years ago, Bank of
Montreal agriculture manager
Steve Saccomano began his
Saccomaniacs Golf
Tournament, subtitled
Agriculture for Autism. This
year’s tournament was held at
the Westwood Plateau and
Academy Golf Courses in
Coquitlam, August 15. While it
was naturally well-populated
by bank sta, Saccomano
notes about 75% of the 200
participants were primary
producers.
This was also a very
successful event, raising over
$50,000 for the Pacic Autism
Family Centre.
This year, the BC Chicken
Growers Association and BC
Hatching Egg Producers
joined the parade, hosting
their rst-ever charity golf
tournament at the Chilliwack
Golf Course, June 23.
For an initial event, it was a
huge success, raising over
$40,000 for the Canuck Place
Children’s Hospice.
A good egg! Dave Jonkman, left, of Jonkman Equipment, bought
potentially prize-winning “eggs” from Steve Fike and Nicole
Robson of the Union Gospel Mission during the annual BC Turkey
and Egg golf tournament in Langley. (David Schmidt photo)
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FOR SALE
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NEW
POLYETHYLENE
TANKS
of all shapes & sizes for septic and water
storage. Ideal for irrigation, hydroponics,
washdown, lazy wells, rain water, truck
box, fertizilizer mixing & spraying.
Call 1-800-661-4473
for closest distributor.
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Manufactured in Delta by
Premier Plastics Inc.
STEEL
STORAGE
CONTAINERS
FOR SALE
OR RENT
jentonstorage@gmail.com
604-534-2775
EZEE-ON
FRONT END
LOADERS
#125 Hi-Lift, c/w 8’ bucket, $4,000
#90 c/w Q/A 7’ bucket
& Q/A bale spike, $3,500
Both are in excellent condition.
Call
250/567-2607
(Vanderhoof)
TWO YEAR OLD
PB ROMNEY RAM
imported from S Oregon, available in
October. Also, 20 PB white and
coloured Romney lambs, well grown,
correct, healthy. Flock selected for
ease of lambing, prolificacy, and
conformation for 35 years. Discount
on 3 or more.
Call
Bramblewood Farm
604/462-9465
WEB HOSTING
COURTENAY HEREFORDS. FIVE POLLED
Hereford bulls for sale. One two year
old/four yearlings. Cow/calf pairs also for
sale. 250/334-3252.
Host your website with us.
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VEGETABLE EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: carrot
harvester, drum washer c/w hoist and
conveyor, packaging equipment, 5 ton
delivery truck and more. For photos and
more info, call David at 250/330-4494.
PUREBRED KATAHDIN BRED EWES, 18
months old, and purebred Katahdin ewe
lambs, 7 months old for sale. Phone
250/672-5159 or email
[jerdonbrown1@gmail.com]
FIELD READY EQUIPMENT:
NH 1033 BALE WAGON, 104 bales, nice
cond, $6,200
JD 467 SQUARE BALER, hyd tension, low
bale count, $9,000
NH 258 AND 260 V-rake combo $6,000
JD 670 RAKE, drawbar pull, wheel drive,
$1,800
KUHN FC300G DISC MOWER,10’, low
acres, finger conditioners, $12,500
NEIMEYER 6-STAR TEDDER, $2,400
CLAUS ROUND BALER, $4,900
2 JIFFY/CRAWFORD HYDUMPS, 14’
$3,200 and $6,500
NH CORN HEAD, 8-row, hyd folds to 6 row,
Claus model, can be fitted onto JD, $16,000
RANSOMES JAGUAR RIDE-ON MOWER
4x4, 72”, Kubota diesel, 1200 total hrs,
$8,500
NORTE CAR/EQUIPMENT TRAILER, 18’
tandem, 14,000 lbs GVW, beaver tail,
ramps, bumper pull, only 2000 original km,
$,5400
Abbotsford, call Jim 604/852-6148.
Heavy duty oil field pipe bale feeders. Feed
savers, single round bale feeders outside
measurement is 8’x8.5’ Double round bale
feeder measurement is 15’x8’. Silage bunk
feeders. Prices start at $900. Also Drill
Pipe 2 3/8” or 2 7/8” by appr. 30’ long.
Call Dan 250/308-9218 Coldstream, BC
CATTLE AND HORSE FEEDERS
FOR SALE
These feeders maintain their value!
TIMOTHY HORSE HAY $150/TON, Cow Hay
$95/ton at Creston BC, Trucking available.
250/428-6453 or 250/428-6520.
WANTED: JONAGOLD APPLES, large
quantities. Orchard run or cull fruit
acceptable. Long term purchase agreements
an option if desired. Don’t rip out those
productive trees! Call Rachel 604/308-4805,
or e-mail [rsbolongaro@gmail.com].
Toll Free 1-888-357-0011
www.ultra-kelp.com
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DeBOER’S USED
TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT
GRINDROD, BC
JD 7400 MFWD c/w cab, 3 pt, ldr 64,000
JD 6410 MFWD, cab & ldr 54,000
JD 6400 MFWD, cab & ldr 49,000
JD 6400 MFWD, w/ldr 29,500
JD 4240 cab, 3pt hitch 18,500
JD 1830 diesel, with loader 10,500
NH 1032 bale wagon, 70 cap. 5,500
NH 575 baler 10,500
JD 220 20’ disc, ctr fold, complete new
set of blades 16,500
JD 4200 4 bottom rollover plow 6,500
JD 450 10’ seed drill w/grass
seed attachment 4,950
JD AW 14’ tandem disk 2,500
KVERNLAND 4x16” 3 pt plow 2,500
Ed DeBoer • 250/838-7362
cell 250/833-6699
Curt DeBoer • 250/838-9612
cell 250/804-6147
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Lola!
Country Life in BC • October 201644
THE ALL NEW MID-SIZE
M6 TRACTORS FROM KUBOTA.
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DAWSON CREEK DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT 250/782-5281
DUNCAN ISLAND TRACTOR & SUPPLY LTD 250/746-1755
KAMLOOPS DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT 250/851-2044
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PRINCE GEORGE HUBER EQUIPMENT 250/560-5431
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