Postmaster, Please return
Undeliverable labels to:
Country Life in BC
1120 East 13th Ave
Vancouver, BC V5T 2M1
CANADA POSTES
POST CANADA
Postage paid Port payé
Publications Mail Post-publications
40012122
Vol. 102 No. 3
Trade Blueberry producers challenged by Asian markets 13
Safety Ag Safety Week is March 13-19 – be careful out there 34
Organics Canadian standards receive major overhaul 40
Life
in BC
The agricultural news source in
British Columbia since 1915
Vol. 102 No. 3 • March 2016
Province ups ministry budget; land commission benefits
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
BC cole crop and potato
growers are looking for options after the
province’s last remaining processor indicated
it will no longer process most vegetables.
“Lucerne Foods has been mandated to
(reduce) our vegetable pack and (increase) our
blueberry pack and our retail packaging,”
Lucerne’s agricultural supervisor John Quapp
said in a February 1 email sent to all growers
and interested persons.
Lucerne’s Abbotsford processing plant had
been a division of Canada Safeway but
became part of Sobey’s when the Ontario-
based supermarket chain acquired Safeway
last year. At the end of January, it was sold to
Nature’s Touch Frozen Foods of Quebec,
Canada’s largest retail packer of frozen fruit.
Since Lucerne had already been supplying
Nature’s Touch with packaged fruit, Quapp
says “it was a logical next step for them to
purchase us,” calling it a “very good t … they
are on the East Coast and we are on the West
Coast.”
He says the purchase “provides our
employees and our growers alike some
condence in the future,” noting Nature’s
Tech has both domestic and international
retail sales.
Lucerne general manager Travis Drew says
their vegetable processing had already
decreased “quite a bit” over the years. Even
though vegetables still represented about half
Please see “TOO MUCH” page 2
Y
COUNTRY
Another FV processor packs it in
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VICTORIA The BC Agriculture
Council has come out in support of
what BC Minister of Agriculture Norm
Letnick calls a “fantastic” provincial
budget for agriculture. BCAC
executive director Reg Ens is less
eusive but does call it “stable and
safe. There aren’t really any negatives.”
The agriculture ministry’s budget
was set at $81.472 million in operating
expenses and $1.168 million in capital
expenditures. Although just $1.577
million more than the 2015-16
agriculture budget (which ends March
31) it does fulll the promise of an
increase which nance minister Mike
De Jong made at the Mainland Milk
Producers annual meeting in January.
Most of the increase goes to the
Agricultural Land Commission which is
receiving an additional $1.1 million.
Former Delta South
MLA and
parliamentary
secretary for
agriculture Val
Roddick continues to
be an enthusiastic
supporter of the
industry, picking up
one of FCC’s
Agriculture More
Than Ever T-shirts at
the Pacic Agriculture
Show in January.
(Cathy Glover photo)
True
believer
Please see “PST” page 2
Increased ALC funding
to improve efficiencies;
ag council says
“better than nothing”
IRRIGATION LTD
1-888-675-7999
www.watertecna.com
PROVINCE WIDE DELIVERY
PROVINCE WIDE DELIVERY
Growing more
with less water
FREE PTO PUMP
See our ad on page 23
for details!
1-888-770-7333
Quality Seeds ... where quality counts!
See inside for our 2016
SEED GUIDE
TOO MUCH FOR FRESH MARKET TO ABSORB From page 1
PST EXEMPTION LIST EXPANDED From page 1
Country Life in BC • March 20162
“This is 33% more for the
ALC’s base budget,” Letnick
notes, saying the increased
funding will increase the
speed of ALC’s decision-
making, help it improve its
relationship with local
governments and allow it to
hire additional compliance
and enforcement sta.
“We think it’s a good thing
they’re funding compliance
and enforcement,” Ens says.
The PST exemption list for
bonade farmers has been
expanded to include
telescopic handlers (for
handling forage, hay, manure
and pallets), skid steers and
polycarbonate greenhouses.
The government also
announced it will establish a
committee to review the PST
system.
BCAC welcomes the review
but is disappointed a return to
HST has been ruled out.
“An HST-like system has
been our policy since before
HST was brought in,” Ens
states.
BCAC also welcomes the
new non-refundable 25% tax
credit for farmers and
corporations who donate food
to food banks, schools and
other non-prots. Letnick says
the Ministry of Finance is still
working out such program
details as which products are
eligible and how, or even if,
the value of donations made
by associations (such as
MMP’s $100,000 donation of
milk to Fraser Valley food
banks) can be passed through
to producers.
The budget also continues
funding for the school fruit
and vegetable nutrition
program and extends the Buy
Local program for another
year at $2 million.
“The $6 million we put into
the program over the last
three years generated $9
million in matching industry
funding so I’m hoping this will
bring total Buy Local
spending up to $20 million by
the end of this year,” Letnick
says.
Long term and inclusive
While Ens calls the money
“better than nothing,” BCAC
continues to ask government
for “a more strategic, long-
term and inclusive approach
to support the growth of the
entire agriculture and agri-
foods sector, not just
individual operations.”
The throne speech also
announced plans to expand
the “Buy Local, Grow Local”
program, and Letnick hopes
to launch a pilot project this
summer, or at the very latest,
next summer. If a project does
go ahead this summer, it will
be reported on at the BC
Conference on Food Security,
which was announced in the
throne speech and will be
held at the Capri Hotel in
Kelowna in November. Letnick
says the conference’s
objective is to “ensure we
continue our great success in
agrifood and move forward
on food supply security.”
The Minister’s Agrifood
Advisory Committee is
working with ministry sta to
develop the conference
agenda and Letnick expects
details to be nalized by late
March or early April.
BCAC chair Stan Vander
Waal says the budget “does
not include everything
needed to secure the long-
term sustainability of
agriculture in in our
province,” but calls it a
“positive step.”
BC Fruit Growers
Association general manager
Glen Lucas and BC
Cattlemen’s Association
general manager Kevin Boon
are pleased the government
has responded to BCAC’s
request to include climate
adaptation and emergency
response planning in the
budget.
“Intense summer droughts
and intense winter ooding
has become the new normal.
The associated costs are not
sustainable for farming
families, which is why funding
for long-term planning and
adaptation is critical,” Lucas
says.
Boon noted last summer’s
wildres devastated entire
ranches and destroyed
kilometers of livestock
fencing. “The provincial
government’s investment in
wildre management mirrors
actual need so I look forward
to seeing the funds put to
good use,” he said.
of the fresh throughput, he
notes it represented only 5%
of Lucerne’s packaging
business.
Drew says Nature Tech
intends to increase berry
processing “three to four
times” but will not abandon
vegetables altogether. “We
will continue to process
rhubarb and there’s a good
possibility we’ll still be doing
peas.”
Exactly what and how
much Lucerne will process
this year won’t be known for
certain until the BC Vegetable
Marketing Commission holds
its negotiations for peas,
beans, broccoli, cauliower
and Brussels sprouts in late
February and early March.
BC Cole Crop Growers
Association manager Mike
Wallis said Lucerne’s decision
aects eight growers and
about 650-700 acres of
product. While he expects
some to try to sell more
product into the fresh market,
which is not regulated, Wallis
wonders how much more the
fresh market can take.
Grower options are “slim,”
admits BCVMC general
manager Andre Solymosi.
While BC Frozen Foods has
been taking some of the crop
in recent years, it has not
been a major player in the
past.
He believes there is an
opportunity for BC Frozen
Foods and/or someone else
to step up to ll the void
since “there is a demand for
local product.”
However, Wallis does not
hold out much hope, saying
some growers have already
put their harvesters up for
sale. One grower who appears
to have seen the writing on
the wall is Bill Shoker of
Shoker Farms. Shoker used to
grow over 2,000 acres of
primarily sprouts and other
cole crops for Lucerne but
sold its sprouts harvester a
few years ago, cut its acreage
back to under 1,000 and now
grows only blueberries and
rhubarb.
“Lucerne is still going to
take our berries and rhubarb
so their decision will not
aect us,” Shoker said.
Rotation crops
BC Fresh president Murray
Driediger says his growers’
largest concern is losing some
of the crops which potato
growers use as rotation crops.
(Potatoes should only be
grown on a eld once every
three years.)
He notes beans, peas and
cole crops are good rotation
crops for root vegetables,
saying if Lucerne continues to
process peas “it will help.”
He expects some growers
to try to expand their fresh
market sales but says that is
fraught with danger if there is
no processor to take the
surplus and byproduct.
“When you don’t have a
processing backstop, it’s like a
trapeze act without a safety
net,” Driediger says.
“Within my lifetime, I have
watched seven pretty strong
national processors disappear
from the province,” he adds
ruefully. “It’s sad when you
reect on the opportunities
that were there.”
Ag minister Norm Letnick
CASE IH TM200
FIELD CULTIVATOR, 26.5’ WW,
REAR HYD HITCH KIT $39,950
JOHN DEERE 512 DISK RIPPER
7 SHANKS, OFFSET DISKS, CLEAN
UNIT $22,500
GENIE 842 TELEHANDLER
PALLET FORKS, 1610 HOURS
$55,950
’96 KUBOTA L2350
25 HP, LB400 LDR, 540 PTO,
TURF TIRES $8,950
06 NH TM155
4WD, AC, HEAT, 850TL SELF LEVELING
LDR, 5200 HRS $59,950
VOLVO L50B WHEEL LOADER
1725 HRS, BKT/FORKS, GOOD TIRES,
$39,950
2008 CASE IH PUMA 195
16SP PWRSHIFT, LX770 LDR,
NICE TIRES, $120,000
FarmersEquip.com
888-855-4981
LYNDEN, WA
PRICES IN US DOLLARS
#22554
$120,000
$120,000
#23278
$8,950
$8,950
#22791
$59,950
$59,950
#20050
$39,950
$39,950
#22558
$39,950
$39,950
#22535
$22,500
$22,500
#15525
$55,950
$55,950
www.tractorparts4sale.ca
ABBOTSFORD, BC
Bus. 604/807-2391
Fax. 604/854-6708 email:
sales@tractorparts4sale.ca
We accept Interact, Visa and Mastercard
CLAAS 740T SIX BASKET TEDDER, MANUAL FOLD, EXC COND ...... 7,500
JOHN DEERE 5500 4X4, LOADER, 83 HP, FWD/REV, OPEN STATION,
LOADER ATTACH INCLUDED............................................................... CALL
JOHN DEERE 5300 4X4, 56 HP, FWD/REV, OPEN STATION .......... 18,000
CAT 910E LOADER, 80 HP TURBO, FWD/REV POWERSHIFT,
FAIR CONDITION ............................................................................. 15,000
JD 5105 2WD, OPEN STATION, 45 PTO HP, LOW HRS . .................... CALL
KUBOTA M5040 2WD, 45 PTO HP, LIKE NEW CONDITION ............ CALL
JD 2130 2WD CAB, 3385 HRS, HYD PTO, HYD TWO SPEED,
540 PTO, TWO REMOTES .................................................................. 9,200
NH 676 MANURE SPREADER, TANDEM WALKING BEAM AXLE ...... 5,500
Tractor/Equipment Repair Mobile Service Available
GD Repair Ltd
NEW REPLACEMENT PARTS
for MOST TRACTORS & FARM IMPLEMENTS
We sell
OEM KVERNELAND & FELLA PARTS
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 3
Agriculture shines
in ag gala spotlight
BCAC chair Stan Vander Waal,
left, and Doug Grimson, right,
from HUB Insurance, presented
BC rancher and FRISP manager
Lee Hesketh with the BC
Agriculture Council’s Excellence
in Agriculture Leadership
Award at the annual Agriculture
Gala, January 27.
(Cathy Glover photo)
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD The awards
keep piling up for Lee Hesketh
and the Farmland-Riparian
Interface Stewardship
Program (FRISP) he manages
as a one-man show.
During the January 27 BC
Ag Gala, the BC Agriculture
Council gave Hesketh its
Excellence in Agriculture
Leadership Award. The annual
award recognizes “high
standards of leadership and
innovation.”
In 2009, Hesketh received
the Doreen Wright Award
from the Fraser Basin Council.
In 2012, the Hesketh family’s
ranch in Lumby, Silver Hills,
where Hesketh hosts an
annual Finding Common
Ground workshop, received
the BC Cattlemen’s
Association Environmental
Stewardship Award, and in
2014, Canada’s premiers gave
FRISP its Excellence in Water
Stewardship Award.
The BCCA established FRISP
with a shoestring budget over
a dozen years ago and
contracted Hesketh to help
ranchers improve
management of riparian areas
on their ranches.
“I was hired on a temporary
basis and I’m still temporary,”
the ever-humble Hesketh said.
Champions of ag
With a theme of
“Champions of Agriculture,”
the Ag Gala also recognized
2016 BC Outstanding Young
Farmers Brian and Jewel Pauls
of Chilliwack and gave time in
its program for the BC
Agriculture in the Classroom
Foundation to present its
2015 Outstanding Teacher
Award to Patricia Regan of Sir
Charles Tupper Secondary in
Vancouver.
Regan has been using such
AITC resources as Spud ‘n’
Tubs, Take A Bite of BC and
the BC School Fruit and
Vegetable Nutritional Program
in her home economics,
tourism and culinary arts
classes to teach students
about locally-grown BC
products.
AgSafe BC executive
director Wendy Bennett used
the Ag Gala to promote a new
AgSafety Champ award the
association will be presenting
for the rst time at next year’s
Ag Gala.
She encouraged farmers
and ranchers to submit their
photos and tips on farm safety
and nominate a farmer or
rancher for the new award.
Bennett noted farm
fatalities have been reduced
almost 50% over the past 10
years but said industry can do
even better. She called the
new campaign an attempt to
“put safety back in your
hands.”
As usual, the Ag Gala
attracted a full house,
including a large contingent
of local and provincial
politicians. Signaling that an
election is not that far away,
there were as many NDP as
Liberal MLA’s in attendance.
The NDP contingent included
both NDP agriculture critic
Lana Popham and NDP leader
John Horgan.
BC Minister of Agriculture
Norm Letnick, who was
attending his third Ag Gala as
agriculture minister, led the
Liberal contingent. He pointed
out agrifood is now the
number two manufacturing
sector in the province. Total
agrifood output in 2015
increased 5.9% over 2014,
after a 3.5% increase in 2014.
“Our momentum is great,”
Letnick said, noting the job
now is to “encourage BC’ers to
buy more local BC product.”
That means building
greater trust with consumers,
says BCAC chair Stan
Vanderwal.
Because “people are more
curious about how their food
is grown,” Vanderwal says
BCAC intends to increase its
communication with
consumers this year. “It’s time
to tell our story.”
3399 DAVISON ROAD, VERNON | 134.48 acres on 2 titles. Currently agricultural zoned
property. Adjacent to Turtle Mtn. Estates this is an excellent investment property, with the
approx. 25 acres designated RH-1, RH-2, P-2 and park with the balance agriculture. Older 4 bed/2
bath rancher, 90'x 272' indoor arena, 35x80 hay shed, 68x80 shop. Land has a gentle slope
which offers great valley and lake views. Serviced with municipal water, this property has much
to offer. MLS® 10109816 $3,300,000
Downtown Realty
4007 - 32nd Street, Vernon, BC V1T 5P2
Toll Free: 1-800-434-9122
www.royallegpage.ca
PAT DUGGAN
Farm | Ranch | Residential
Bus: 250/545-5371 (24 hr)
Cell: 250/308-0938
email: patduggan@royallepage.ca
“Farmers helping farmers with their real estate needs”
www.OkLandBuyers.ca
INVEST IN QUALITY
®
Matsqui
Ag-Repair
Abbotsford, BC
604-826-3281
Noble
Tractor & Equipment
Armstrong, BC
250-546-3141
Noble
Tractor & Equipment
Kamloops, BC
250-851-3101
Huber
Farm Equipment
Prince George, BC
250-560-5431
KuhnNorthAmerica.com
Purchase a select new Kuhn VB round baler, then cut the price further
with a Round Up the Savings coupon!
Visit your local dealer for details and to receive your coupon.
Offer ends May 31, 2016
The United Nation’s Framework Convention on
Climate Change treaty was negotiated at the
Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The treaty
began the process of coming to grips with rising
levels of atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHG),
most notably carbon dioxide (CO2).
The treaty did not set GHG limits or suggest
enforcement mechanisms. It came into effect in
1994 and its signatories have been meeting
annually since 1995. These meetings have
spawned numerous protocols and agreements –
most notably the Kyoto Protocol in 1995, the
Cancun Agreements in 2010, the Doha
Amendment in 2012 and the Paris Agreement in
December 2015. Good intentions and rhetoric
notwithstanding, thus far the process has done
little more than set targets that cannot or will not
be achieved.
Atmospheric CO2
The majority consensus of climate science
suggests that 350 ppm of atmospheric CO2 is the
level necessary to avoid climate change. At the
Rio Summit in 1992, atmospheric CO2 was 355
ppm. Three months ago in Paris, it was nearing
402 parts per million (ppm).
Climate reality is hitting home and the
desirability of 350 ppm has been replaced by the
possibility of 450 ppm by 2050. That is the level
that climate scientists say must be met if overall
global warming is to be limited to 2 degrees C
and catastrophic climate change avoided.
GHG’s are currently increasing at more than
two ppm every year and climbing on a rocket-ship
trajectory. What if we blow right past 450 ppm?
One school of thought suggests we will do just
that and wind up hitting 550 ppm and a six
degree temperature rise before the end of the
century.
Archaeologically, we are living in the Holocene
Epoch, which began with the end of the last ice
age 11,700 years ago. But history might re-locate
us to the first years of the Arthropocene Age, the
time when human activity significantly changed
the geologic record.
Different views
Though most geologists say there is insufficient
evidence to support the Arthropocene, other
scientists point to the detectable global spread of
nuclear-related radioactivity as the start of a new
age of man starting in 1950. Others date the
Arthropocene to the Industrial Revolution in
Britain and the dawn of widespread fossil fuel
extraction.
We are, perhaps, very humanly pretentious to
assign such importance to the rise and possible
fall of our own short-lived species. Two hundred
thousand years is, after all, little more than a blip
on the four billion year history of the planet. Earth
has seen many more catastrophes than whatever
mankind might conjure by cranking the
atmospheric CO2 level past the five or six
hundred ppm level. Five hundred million years
ago in the Cambrian period, atmospheric CO2 was
6,000 ppm; two hundred million years ago at the
beginning of the Jurassic Period, it was 1,200 to
1,500 ppm. By the Miocene Epoch 20 million years
ago, widespread forests had lowered atmospheric
CO2 to 100 ppm. So, CO2 levels have been many
times higher in the past and have come down
naturally. There is no reason to believe that they
would not do so again. Problematic for humans is
the pace of change.
Hyper-extractive
It might well take nature several million years
to bring back 200 ppm atmospheric CO2. The
reality is over the entire history of our species,
CO2 has fluctuated between 180 and 280 ppm. It
has never approached 400 ppm – until now.
We are rapidly moving beyond the point at
which there is any hope of averting eventual
climate calamity. Certainly, the situation calls for
much, much more than the foot-dragging
innuendo and procrastination of the past quarter
century. Any potential for a soft climate landing
has been squandered and it is delusional to
believe we can keep burning all of the carbon
concentrated in the remains of those Miocene
forests and send it into the atmosphere so we can
sustain a hyper-extractive consumer-centric
society.
We are here because we have evolved in a
suitable and largely stable environment and we
abuse it at our own peril.
Climate engineers talk a good story about
putting mirrors in orbit or pumping sulphur into
the upper atmosphere to turn the sky grey (quite
literally smoke and mirrors) and Richard Branson
wants to colonize Mars.
The real solution is to heed nature and reality.
We will all need to start very soon or the
Arthropocene may be the shortest Age of all.
Editor & Publisher Peter Wilding
Phone: 604/871-0001 • Fax: 604/871-0003
E-mail: countrylifeinbc@shaw.ca • Web: countrylifeinbc.com
Associate Editor David Schmidt
Phone: 604-793-9193
E-mail: davidschmidt@shaw.ca
Advertising Sales & Marketing Cathy Glover
Phone: 604/328-3814
E-mail: cathyglover@telus.net
Production Ass’t: Ann Morris • Senior Researcher: Phil “D’oh!” Gordon
COUNTRY
Life
Advertising is accepted on the condition that in the event of a typographical error, that portion
of the advertising space occupied by the erroneous item, together with reasonable allowance for
signature will not be charged, but the balance of the advertisement will be paid for at the
applicable rate.
In the event of a typographical error which advertises goods or services at a wrong price, such
goods or services need not be sold at the advertised price. Advertising is an offer to sell, and may
be withdrawn at any time. All advertising is accepted subject to publisher’s approval.
All of Country Life in British Columbias content is covered by Canadian copyright law.
Opinions expressed in signed articles are those of the writer and not necessarily those of
Country Life in British Columbia.
Letters are welcome, though they may be edited in the interest of brevity before publication.
All errors brought to our attention will be corrected.
The agricultural news source
in British Columbia since 1915
Published monthly by
Country Life 2000 Ltd.
Vol. 102 No. 3
March 2016
in B.C.
1120 East 13th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5T 2M1 Publication Mail Agreement: 0399159 GST Reg. No: 86878 7375 Subscriptions: $18.90/year • $33.60/2 years • $37.80/3 years
All prices incl GST
It’s not nice to fool Mother Nature
The Back 40
BOB COLLINS
Country Life in BC • March 20164
One shouldn’t look a gift horse in the mouth, yet last month’s provincial
budget is rather sway-backed when it comes to carrying agriculture.
The province champions agriculture as a key economic sector, one that’s
critical to growing the province’s exports across the Pacific and around the
world.
Securing access to China for premium BC fruit, the repeal of contentious
Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) rules for beef and pork, and striking the
Trans-Pacific Partnership are achievements that the province has cheered as
it seeks to boost the total value of the province’s agri-food sector to $15
billion by 2020 from $12.3 billion in 2014.
To that end, it’s increased the operating budget for the province’s
agriculture ministry – long one of the least-funded agriculture ministries in
Canada – to $81.5 million in expenditures.
That’s just $1.6 million more than the previous year’s budget – a 1.9%
increase.
By comparison, the standard increase that landlords in the province are
allowed to charge tenants is 2.9%, based on a formula of the annual
inflation rate plus 2% – a more generous raise than provincial staffers will
see.
Small wonder even the BC Agriculture Council bit its lip in praising the
increase, expressing gratitude while saying it isn’t enough for the sector’s
long-term sustainability.
But wait, perhaps the key lies in where the money is flowing.
The province has marked most of the added funds for the Agricultural
Land Commission, under fire on several fronts for being over-worked,
under-resourced, out of touch or simply powerless (at least where Port
Metro Vancouver is concerned).
One can’t argue with funding designed to protect farmland and ensure
it’s used for food production, but that leaves just $477,000-odd to support
the research, extension and support services which growers need in order
to grow and sell their product.
That’s a role government seems set to let industry continue playing.
Letnick congratulates industry for its fine work in ponying up $9 million
over the last three years for Buy Local programming, matching government
funding of just $6 million.
With that kind of effort, Letnick hopes Buy Local funding will total $20
million this fiscal year – again, largely thanks to industry commitments.
Provincial agriculture funding has increased, sure – but much of it linked
to industry’s support of itself.
Rather like US presidential hopeful Donald Trump saying he’ll build a wall
and get Mexico to pay for it, Victoria is telling agriculture it’s here to help.
But what’s it got to give?
Agriculture is fundamental to domestic food security, a matter that’s
much in the public interest as this winter’s spike in produce prices made
clear.
It’s time Victoria dedicated more money not just to laying the ground
rules for agriculture, but to the researchers and extension workers who help
farmers stay competitive at home and abroad.
Budget emphasizes agriculture’s contribution
Whenever the subject of organic agriculture
surfaces in a discussion about modern farming, the
“yabuts” start owing fast and sometimes, furiously.
Ya but organic farmers don’t produce as much as
conventional farmers do so if everyone went
organic, there would be shortages, more pressure
on land and higher food prices. And so it goes.
Those yabuts are rooted in a certain ideology
about agriculture that is deeply entrenched in
practice, policy
and even our
language – a view
that organic
agriculture is an
outdated and
inecient farming
system that romanticizes the good old days.
John P. Reganold and Jonathon M. Wachter,
authors of a newly released report from the
Washington State University (WSU), trace it back to
former US agriculture secretary Earl Butz – the same
guy who encouraged farmers in the early 1970s to
grow fencerow to fencerow.
“Before we go back to organic agriculture in this
country, somebody must decide which 50 million
Americans we are going to let starve or go hungry,“
Butz reportedly said in 1971.
40 years of science analyzed
This latest study, Organic Agriculture in the 21st
Century, appears in the February issue of the journal
Nature Plants. Reganold, a WSU professor of soil
science and agro-ecology, and doctoral candidate
Wachter, analyzed 40 years of science comparing
organic and conventional agriculture against four
metrics of sustainability as identied by the National
Academy of Sciences: productivity, economics,
environment and community well-being.
Organic production systems compare favourably
on three out of the four.
The analysis challenges conventional thinking in
the ongoing debate over how agriculture can best
meet the needs of the world’s growing population
without destroying the planet.
It’s not ideological to say that organic farming
systems yield fewer bushels per acre. That’s a fact.
The WSU report found organic farming systems
yield on average eight to 25% less than chemically
based systems. But it is a fact of diminishing
signicance as that gap closes thanks to better seed,
growing conditions and management.
The ideology lies in the assumptions that the
pursuit of high-yield agriculture will “feed the world”
and that it will reduce the pressure on the world’s
remaining undeveloped lands. In reality, that
pressure continues at a relentless pace through high
prices and low.
There is also a certain ideology in the language
describing conventional farming as “modern” and
organic as about “going back.” While organic
production systems don’t use the chemical
production aids developed over the past 50 years or
so, today’s organic farmers know far more about
managing biological systems than their
grandparents did.
There are environmental costs to crop inputs
such as nitrogen that aren’t fully accounted for in
the price of food. Cash strapped governments
looking for ways to mitigate and adapt to climate
change are starting to notice.
The research into organic and perennial cropping
systems could provide answers to conventional
farmers, too. The evidence shows the organic model
delivers healthier soil with better water-holding
capacity, uses less energy, and emits fewer
greenhouse gases. The study cites “some evidence”
it produces more nutritious food, too, although that
remains hotly debated.
As for the argument,“ya but organic foods cost
more,” that’s absolutely true. Where it gets
ideological is debating whether that’s a good or bad
thing.
Demand continues to grow
Consumers vote with their dollars. The WSU study
noted sales of organic foods and beverages
increased ve fold to US$72 billion between 1999
and 2013 and they are expected to double again by
2018. Demand continues to grow faster than the
available supply.
The fact that there is a growing subset of the
consuming public that is willing to pay more to eat
should be celebrated in agriculture, not scorned.
That’s not to say organic is for everyone. Nor
should this editorial be misconstrued as promoting
this system over others.
There are barriers to entry into organic farming,
beginning with the three years of transition before a
person can collect those premiums. It requires a
dierent mindset and is more labour intensive.
Existing farm policy tends to support the status quo.
But as a business proposition, it’s a legitimate
one, especially in an era when society is looking for
agriculture to be part of a sustainable solution
instead of being part of the problem.
Farm organizations have been lobbying
governments for more than a decade for policies
that reward farmers for delivering environmental
goods and services. Organic farmers are already
being rewarded – through the marketplace.
Laura Rance is editor of Manitoba Co-Operator.
Organic growers have more than ideology on their side
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 5
Viewpoint
LAURA RANCE
www.patonauctions.com
MOVE IN DAYS: TUESDAY, APRIL 26 TO THURSDAY, APRIL 28 9 AM TO 5 PM, FRIDAY, APRIL 29 9 AM TIL 11 AM ONLY
CALL US FOR HONEST and REPUTABLE AUCTION SERVICES
IAN PATON | 604.644.3497
ian@patonauctions.com
PROFESSIONAL LIVESTOCK & FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION SERVICES & APPRAISAL
S
...
specializing in on-site farm dispersals
I. Paton & Associates Ltd.
FARM EQUIPMENT at HERITAGE PARK FAIRGROUNDS
This auction offers the farming community an excellent
opportunity to sell one or two items or even a small
dispersal of your items at this wonderful facility.
• TRACTORS
• ALL TYPES of FARM EQUIPMENT
• FARM TRUCKS
• RVs, BOATS & ATVs
AUCTION CONDUCTED OUTDOORS IN THE HUGE WEST PARKING AREA
10% BUYERS FEE ON ITEMS SOLD FOR $2000 OR LESS.
SATURDAY
APRIL 30
9 AM
START
CHILLIWACK
CONSIGNMENT AUCTION
Country Life in BC • March 20166
Editor:
(Re: The real truth about
GMOs and why we need them,
Page 5, February 2016)
It is my opinion that
education is essential to draw
valid conclusions. The Suzuki
Foundation concludes the
safety of GMOs is unproven
and further research must be
done in connecting GMOs with
health concerns and damage
to the environment. Something
must be wrong if the scientic
community is questioning the
value of GMOs.
My argument is with Round-
Up Ready and insecticide
producing crops. Round-Up
was once thought to be safe,
have a short half-life and have
little eect on soil ora and
mycorrhizae. This has been
refuted in Scientic Reports by
J.G. Zaller et al.
As these crops decompose,
are there any eects on
migratory birds? In the past,
malathion use caused the near
demise our Bald Eagle.
Currently, blueberry farmers
are using poison to control
indigenous rodents which are
food for raptors. Rodent
tunnels are homes for honey
bees. Poisoning the rodents
ultimately disrupts the natural
balance.
Monsanto is not a farmer
but the poster child for GMO
companies. Solving world
nutrition may not lie with
GMOs. Canada’s four GMO
crops (corn, sugar beet, soy
and canola) are neither
nutritionally or strategically
essential in solving world
hunger. A more logical
More research needed: GMOs
Letters
Editor:
Re: Battle Brewing as Port Eyes Farm Land, February 2016
I would suggest that it is all ne and dandy for Minister
Letnick to say “the normal rules will apply” as and when
Port Metro Vancouver develops its agricultural properties.
The fact is that the Port doesn’t have to follow the normal
provincial rules.
Further, its president, Mr. Silvester, has clearly indicated
the Port has “supremacy” and will not hesitate to exercise
its jurisdiction.
It is my rmly held belief that unless the agricultural
community actively and cohesively ghts the construction
of Terminal 2 at Deltaport with every means at its disposal,
we will soon see the end to a viable agricultural industry in
Delta.
Richmond Mayor (Malcolm) Brodie should be
supported wholeheartedly if we are to protect these vital,
rich and productive lands of the Fraser Delta.
Vicki Huntington, MLA
Delta South
Farm community must
fight Deltaport expansion
Editor:
We have now received our
second issue of Country Life
in BC and our whole family is
enjoying it.
As we are farmers, there
are articles in the paper that
interest all of us. Thank you!
The February issue has an
article called The real truth
about GMOs and why we need
them. It is an awesome
article about GMOs. I would
love to post this article on
Facebook and possibly the
local paper.
Jo Anne Delichte
Coldstream
New subscriber likes GMO article
PANORAMIC 25.6
Abbotsford Location Ɇ6XPDV:D\$EERWVIRUG
Kelowna Location Ɇ6WHYHQV5G.HORZQD
Vernon Location Ɇ0HDGRZODUN5G9HUQRQ
www.avenuemachinery.ca
YOUR OFFICIAL MERLO DEALER:
3$125$0,&&6+' 08/7,)$50(5&/$66,&
2
THE ULTIMATE
INCREASE YOUR PROFITS:
MORE PRECISION
MORE PRODUCTIVITY
MORE VERSATILITY
LESS FUEL
MERLO



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 
CTIONIN A
RLOEM
VEROCDIS



 
THE
CTION
RLO
VER



 
UL
LT



 
TE
A
AT



 



 



 



 



 
INCREASE Y
MORE
MORE



 
OFITS:OUR PRINCREASE Y
CISIONPREMORE
TILITY
A
S
SA
VER
RS
ODUCTIVITYPRMORE



 
CISION
TILITY
ODUCTIVITY



 



 



 



 



 
OUR OFFICIAL MERLY
FUEL
SLES
MORE



 
O DEALER:OUR OFFICIAL MERL
FUEL
TILITY
A
S
SA
VER
RS
MORE



 
TILITY



 



 



 



 



 
enuemacv.awww
iont
ernon Loca
V
Ve
iont LocawnaeloK
ord LocaAbbotsf 


 
.cayhinerenuemac
QRQUH9G5NUDOZRGDH0Ɇion
DQZROH.G5VQHYHW6Ɇion
WREE$\D:VDPX6Ɇtionord Loca 


 
Q
GURIVW 


 
Lots of Equipment
& Parts Specials
OPEN
HOUSE
ABBOTSFORD MARCH 11-12
VERNON APRIL 19
10 til 3
approach to global
malnutrition lies with
providing clean water and the
study of indigenous food
sources and fauna.
In dealing with GMO seeds,
the farmer may not save the
seeds. This is the last thing a
developing country needs. The
conventional farmer has no
legal protection against GMO
crop cross pollination.
Monsanto, therefore, may have
legal claim to the conventional
farmer’s crop. The organic
farmer faces added risk of
losing organic certication.
With regard to pesticide use in
organic farming, Consumer
Report found organic produce
to have substantially lower
levels of pesticides.
Currently, GMO alfalfa is
being marketed in Canada. The
concern here is the
relationship between the leaf
cutting bee and alfalfa
pollination. If the bee’s habitat
is destroyed, there will be no
seed production. Farmers are
at the mercy of marketing
practices as product
pamphlets and reading
material only give positive
benets.
Jacqueline M.J. Reznick
Abbotsford
We can’t bee-lieve what we did!
In our February issue, on pages 10 and 11, we used the incorrect photos
with their corresponding stories. The honey bee pictured on page 10
should have appeared with the cutline on page 11, which credits them
with nearly $16.5 million in retail sales, while the bumble bee should
have run with the story on page 10. We apologize for the oversight.
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 7
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
By all
accounts, the 2016 Pacic
Agriculture Show was the best
ever.
“We had over 800 people
attending the opening
reception alone,” notes trade
show co-ordinator Jim
Shepard.
Over 8,000 people poured
into Abbotsford’s Tradex,
January 28-30, to view the
displays from a record number
of exhibitors in the 18th
annual show. That included
915 people who also took in
all or part of the Horticulture
Growers Short Course, which
took place all three days, 150
people who attended the
Dairy Expo Thursday morning
and 125 people who signed
up for the Agriculture and
Municipal Biogas Forum
Thursday and Friday.
“The grower numbers and
trade show attendance were
both up this year,” reports
Growers Short Course co-
ordinator Sandy Dunn.
While Saturday always
draws a lot of children as well
as adults, there also seemed to
be more children in
attendance on Thursday and
Friday.
“It’s not many places
parents can take their kids
with them when the parents
are doing business and the
kids will still have fun,”
Shepard states.
This year’s audience skewed
younger than in previous years
but it was not just because of
the kids.
“A number of exhibitors
noted there were a lot more
younger farmers,” Shepard
says. “We saw a lot of people
in their mid-20’s and early 30’s
who we didn’t see in the past.”
He notes young farmers
have grown up with
computers and smartphones,
making them not only more
tech-savvy but more
interested in all the new
technology on display.
“We are trying to attract
exhibitors with interesting and
innovative products that
enhance agriculture,” Shepard
says.
Attendance, exhibitor records broken at agriculture show
Above and left, it’s all
about relationships,
and the Pacic Ag
Show provided lots of
opportunities to
network with agri-
businesses – and each
other.
(Randy Giesbrecht
photos)
Sometimes a good nap is just what the doctor ordered, even at the
ag show. (Peter Wilding photo)
44725 Yale Road West Chilliwack Ph: 800.242.9737 604.792.1301
21869 56th Avenue Langley Ph: 800.665.9060 604.533.0048
VENTURI AIR SPRAYERS
3-P
OINT AND TRAILER MOUNT
Our Venturi Air Sprayers produce high air velocities that shear the liquid
to 50 micron fog sized droplets, which penetrate and cling to all areas of
the plant foliage.
The above blueberry/raspberry heads have 3 zone penetration whether
on a 3-point hitch sprayer or trailer sprayer. The simple, unique design of
our sprayers insures easy calibration and low maintenance.
T55AE-800 W/BLUEBERRY HEAD SHOWN
P50S W/BLUEBERRY HEAD
Van Der Wal Equipment (1989) Ltd.
23390 RIVER ROAD, MAPLE RIDGE, BC V2W 1B6
604/463-3681 | vanderwaleq.com
Visit our showroom to see more!
The 750T all wheel steer
model offers excellent
maneuverability, overall machine
stability and the telescopic boom
provides extra reach for stacking
and dumping.
TH522
TELEHANDLER
750T
ALL WHEEL STEER
TELELOADER
Country Life in BC • March 20168
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
Existing well
owners have three years to
register them to preserve their
FITFIR (rst in time rst in right)
standing but only one year if
they want to do it for free.
The new Water Stewardship
Act, which comes
into eect this year,
includes new water
fees and rentals,
introduces
groundwater
licencing, expands
groundwater
protection and sets
new standards for
dam maintenance.
This was the
message BC Ministry
of Environment
(MoE) water strategies and
conservation manager Ted
White had for attendees at the
Pacic Agriculture Show
agricultural water
management session, January
29.
The new well licencing
requirements and dam
maintenance standards will
likely have the most impact on
agricultural water users.
Although there are about
100,000 wells in the province,
the 80,000 wells used for
domestic (household) purposes
are exempt from the licencing
provisions, meaning only about
20,000 wells will need to be
registered with MoE.
The date of rst use will
determine the date of
precedence for users who
register their wells within the
next three years. Anyone who
fails to register a
well within three
years will be treated
as a new user,
thereby forfeiting
any FITFIR rights. In
the absence of a
written record of
rst use, M0E will
accept a sworn
adavit.
Government has
been charging fees
for surface water
use and will now extend those
fees to cover groundwater as
well. Application fees range
from $250 to $1,000 for wells
and $200 to $400 for storage
facilities but are waived for
people who register this year.
Use fees are currently 85¢ per
cubic metre but will be
reviewed in July. Storage rates
(for dams, dugouts, lagoons
and other water storage
facilities with a capacity of
over 10,000 cubic metres) has
been increased from 1¢ to 2¢
per cubic metre with a $25
do that, the Partnership for
Water Sustainability in BC has
created an agriculture water
licence calculator based on
the irrigation water demand
model developed by the
Okanagan Basin Water Board.
Partnership president and
former BCMA water
management specialist Ted
van der Gulik says the online
calculator, available at
[waterbucket.ca], is designed
to be easy to use. The website
also includes a sprinkler
system assessment tool which
he believes farmers will nd
extremely useful.
The calculator allows a user
to enter the type of crop being
grown and type of irrigation
system being used and link
that to a specic licence or
group of licences. Van der
Gulik hopes the system will
eventually be linked to
irrigation pumps and use
meters so it can be used to
report actual water usage.
Users will need a registration
code allowing only persons
they authorize to access their
specic information.
Meanwhile, bureaucrats
continue to develop the
regulations. In particular, they
are setting conditions
whereby users can transfer
their existing surface water
licences to groundwater
licences without losing their
FITFIR rights.
White says the new act puts
the environment at the front
minimum.
Not everyone was happy
with the storage charges,
saying farmers and ranchers
are already spending enough
money just to store the water.
“You’re charging us to store
water and then charging us to
use it. That’s double jeopardy,”
one person stated but White
had no answer.
Unless wells are metered,
fees will be based on the
amount of water rights.
Farmers and ranchers should
therefore carefully consider
how much water they want to
be licenced for. To help them
Comprehensive changes to Water Act this year
BC farmers are going to have to be far more cognizant of their surface and ground water use under
the province’s new Water Stewardship Act. (Emily Bulmer le photo)
Surface water fees extended
to cover groundwater use
www.tubeline.ca 1.888.856.6613
For better management and spreading performance of poultry
litter, Nitro spreaders can be equipped with an optional poultry
litter beater assembly. The interchangeable quick-drop beater
system allows operators to conveniently switch between the
vertical or poultry beater assemblies offering flexibility to both
producers and custom operators.
Contact your Tubeline dealer today and find out how Nitro
Spreaders can help you put litter in its place.
See “REQUIREMENTS” page 9
Ted White
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 9
REQUIREMENTS From page 8
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD Farmers
and ranchers who complete
an Environmental Farm Plan
(EFP) can receive up to
$70,000 in Best Management
Practices (BMP) funding to
improve water management,
BC Ministry of Agriculture
(BCMA) resource management
manager Geo Hughes-Games
told a well-attended
agriculture water
management session at the
Pacic Agriculture Show in
Abbotsford, January 29.
BMP funding can be used to
improve storm water or well
water management, improve
drainage or install a weather
station. However, farmers who
receive funding for a weather
station must provide the data
it collects to
[www.Farmwest.com].
Farmwest is part of a growing
Canada-wide network of
weather stations, about 100 of
which are in BC.
Funding is also available for
irrigation improvements if the
improvements, such as
replacing a wheel line with a
low-pressure pivot irrigation
system, increase irrigation
eciency by at least 15%.
Farmers and ranchers can
also receive up to 100%
funding to complete a riparian
management plan (RMP). The
plan helps them determine
where to site buildings, how to
best water livestock, design
pastures and provide winter-
feeding to minimize the
impact on riparian areas.
Once an RMP is completed,
funding is available for such
things as controlling upland
invasive weeds and building
erosion control structures.
Even if they do not
complete a formal EFP or RMP,
farmers can garner many
useful tips from the irrigation
and drainage guides and
irrigation system assessment
guide available on the BCMA
website.
BCMA regional resource
specialist Andrew Petersen
noted the cheapest way to
improve irrigation eciency is
to repair leaks and replace
worn nozzles.
Having done that, they
should only irrigate to actual
crop requirements, “not
dates.”
Farmers in the Fraser Valley
and Okanagan can get help
doing that by using the
irrigation scheduling
calculator on the Irrigation
Association of BC website.
Reducing water usage is
critical, says BCMA waste
management engineer
Michael Schwalb, noting
droughts are likely to become
more frequent and more
severe in future.
He urges farmers to not just
reduce water usage but
reclaim it. “Recycle water
which would otherwise be
waste,” he says, adding there is
a specic BMP funding
parameter for reclaiming
water.
Examples include
recirculating water in
greenhouses, already common
in BC vegetable greenhouses,
and using dairy wash water to
ush a barn. While one Delta
dairy farm is treating its
manure with reverse osmosis
allowing the uid to reach
drinking water standards,
Schwalb admits it is “probably
not cost-eective.” Instead, he
encourages municipalities to
treat euent for use in
irrigation, which is already
being done in Vernon and
Cranbrook, saying it “oers a
real opportunity where there’s
a large urban interface.”
Petersen reminded farmers
the Fish Protection Act puts
them in a backseat to sh
during a drought. That rst
occurred in 2009 when
ranchers were stopped from
drawing water from the Upper
Nicola River. In 2010, at
Chimney Lake, government
suspended all water licences
issued after 1937. Last year, 50
FPA orders were issued on the
Coldwater River. However,
they only aected six
producers as the rest were
already dry.
“Producers were without
water for 27-28 days,” Petersen
said.
Before the Department of
Fisheries and Oceans issues an
order, it must consider its
impact on agriculture and
Petersen insists they have
been more than fair. Although
orders can be issued when
streamows drop below 500
litres per second, he notes the
Coldwater orders weren’t
applied until the ow dropped
to 250 litres per second.
While Petersen and Schwalb
talked about drought, BCMA
environmental agrologist Mark
Raymond discussed the
opposite scenario – too much
water, such as during a freshet.
To prepare for that
eventuality, chemicals should
be stored above ood levels
and wellheads protected with
a surface seal. When in danger
of a ood, farmers should
reduce the volume in their
manure pit and develop a
relocation plan for their
livestock. To help, the BCMA
oers emergency planning
factsheets and emergency
management guides for dairy,
beef, hogs and other livestock.
So what is the weather
going to be?
Environment Canada (EC)
meteorologist David Jones
says there is no simple answer.
“Looking forward is
extremely challenging,” he
told the group. While
meteorologists can provide a
general indicator of the future
climate, predicting the
weather is much more
complicated.
Besides, meteorologists rely
on “means” in their forecasts
but those can be extremely
misleading. It’s the old story of
putting one foot in ice and
another in boiling water. The
“mean” is comfortable but try
convincing either foot.
Still some sources are more
reliable than others. Jones says
the best is [spotwx.com],
which allows users to drill
down to their specic location.
“When I started, the model
had a 200 km resolution which
was not very helpful but it is
now down to a 2.5 km
resolution,” he notes.
He says EC has developed a
mountain weather forecast site
[avalanche.ca/weather] to help
people avoid potential
avalanches and is now trying to
adapt it for other user groups
such as agriculture. In future, it
may provide more accurate
predictions of spring freshets,
summer and fall droughts as
well as such information as
when to make hay.
Funding available to improve water management
of the line. Although it has
been the practice to consider
environmental ow needs
when issuing new licences,
that is now a requirement
instead of a recommendation.
People drilling new wells will
have to ensure it is done right
by hiring a certied contractor.
Well pits will be restricted and
setbacks developed to protect
existing users.
Andrew Petersen
Mark Raymond
meridianeq.com
MERIDIAN EQUIPMENT CO., INC.
5946 Guide Meridian, BELLINGHAM, WA
PH. 360.398.2141 • email: meridianeq@msn.com
TRACTORS • TRUCKS • IMPLEMENTS
FARM EQUIPMENT
AUCTION
SATURDAY, MARCH 19
Spring Consignment
Spring Consignment
www.islandtractors.com
USED EQUIPMENT
NH FP230 W/ 27P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500
TAARUP 338 MOWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500
NH 1037 BALE WAGON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500
NH 565 SM SQ BALER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500
KUBOTA F3680 60” MWR, GRASS CATCHER . . . . . . . . . . . 10,600
USED TRACTORS
KUBTOA B1750 2532 HRS, LDR, BUHLER Y48SD
TILLER, 3 PT SCOOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,500
KUBOTA B1700 TRACTOR/LOADER, 1350 HRS. . . . . . . . $9,500
KUBOTA B1700 700 HRS, LDR, 48” TILLER, FORKS, SPRAYER 13,500
JD 2305 600 HRS, 2010, LDR/54” MOWER DECK . . . . . . $14,200
NH TS100 7800 HRS, TIGER BOOM MWR, FLAIL HEAD $24,500
NEW INVENTORY
NH T5.115 CAB, MFWD, LDR READY, 24X24 TRANS . . . 75,000
NH H7320 9’ 2” DISCBINE (ONE LEFT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,000
NH BC5070 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CALL
NH BC5070 HAYLINER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CALL
NH BR7060 CROP CUTTER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,000
NH BOOMER TRACTORS (20, 25 & 33 MODELS) CALL DUNCAN
ISLAND TRACTOR
& SUPPLY LTD.
DUNCAN 1-888-795-1755
NORTH ISLAND
TRACTOR
COURTENAY 1-866-501-0801
OPEN HOUSE
April 15, 10 til 2
Duncan
wants the province to
support the sector by buying
at least 30% BC products for
its hospitals and other food
requirements.
“Hospitals alone spend $50
million per year on food. This
is a huge opportunity for BC
agriculture,” she says.
Under her plan, BC
processors would be able to
bid on contracts to supply
the hospitals as long as they
use 100% BC products. She
believes this would create a
base market for local
producers and lead to
expansion of the processing
sector in the province.
Finally, she intends to
revive the Buy BC program.
The program was introduced
by the last NDP government
but “cancelled for partisan
reasons” when the Liberals
took over.
Although the Liberals
recently introduced a Buy
Local program, she says its
scope is more limited than
the previous Buy BC program.
Country Life in BC • March 201610
We buy and sell premium horse & dairy hay in small or large bales.
We also buy & sell replacement dairy cows.
www.tnthay.com
Call Gary 604.316.3244
717
+D\&DWWOH6DOHV
place your hay
order online
ORDER
NOW
Be ready for calving
with MASTERFEEDS proven
mineral program
Country West Supply
All of your equine and livestock feed needs available!
Chilliwack 1-877-37358 // Armstong 1-250-546-9174
www.countrywestsupply.com
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
BC Minister of Agriculture Norm Letnick
has introduced the Food and Agricultural Products
Classication Act, which consolidates and replaces the
Food Products Standards Act, Agri-food Choice and
Quality Act and Agricultural Produce Grading Act. Unlike
the three existing acts which only cover land-based
agricultural products, the new act will also include sh and
seafood.
The primary purpose of Bill 11 is to modernize the three
acts and deliver on Letnick’s promise to provide the
regulatory framework to ensure all food and beverage
products marketed as “organic” in BC are certied under
either a provincial or national certication program by
2018.
The new act would ensure the term “organic” would
have the same denition for products produced and sold
only within the province as it does for products shipped
out-of-province or imported from out-of-province.
The new act will also allow the expansion of name-
appellations to all areas and products, subject to an
industry plebiscite. Currently, name-appelations may only
be applied to products within the VQA (Vintners Quality
Alliance) system.
New food classification
includes fish, seafood
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD – Promoting
agriculture is all about
marketing the stories, says
NDP agriculture critic Lana
Popham.
“You have to speak to the
stomach of the consumer
before you can talk to them
about the rancher in the
Cariboo,” she told BC Farm
Writers at their annual
meeting in Abbotsford,
January 29.
Popham was first elected
to the Legislature in 2009,
intent on fixing the problems
she encountered as a small
lot certified organic farmer in
Saanich.
“I’m committed to
bettering agriculture,” she
says, noting her dream job
would be to be Minister of
Agriculture.
After failing to get the
Liberals to agree to revive the
Standing Committee on
Agriculture, she created her
own Opposition Standing
Committee on Agriculture
and spent last spring touring
and holding public hearings
throughout the province. She
expects to hold a second
round of public hearings this
spring.
The committee tabled its
first report in mid-December,
the same day BC Minister of
Agriculture Norm Letnick
released the government’s
updated Strategic Growth
Plan for agriculture.
While not entirely
denigrating Letnick’s plan,
Popham says taking the two
documents together provides
a “better” roadmap for the
industry’s future.
She says her plan for
agriculture is “evolving” and
uses a three-pronged
approach: “Grow BC, Feed BC,
Buy BC.”
Based on the dirt
Grow BC because
everything is based around
the dirt. While people are
starting to say the right
things, “I don’t think we’re
doing them yet.” She is
particularly critical of recent
changes to the Agricultural
Land Reserve, saying the new
rules “set us up to lose our
food producing lands.”
Feed BC because she
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
The BC Milk
Marketing Board (BCMMB) has
conrmed what Jim Byrne
predicted at the Mainland Milk
Producers annual meeting in
Increase in BC dairy quota confirmed
Lana Popham
Popham aims for dream job as ag minister
January. The board has issued
a 2% prorate quota increase
eective February 1. Like
previous quota issues, it is
subject to the 10/10/10 LIFO
formula, meaning any
producers who sell all or part
of their quota within the next
year will lose all of the latest
allocation.
The BCMMB has also
announced it will soon stop
leaving pickup slips at a dairy
when milk is picked up. Rather
than replace the deteriorating
handheld equipment which milk
truck drivers have been using,
the board is switching to new
GPS-equipped mobile devices.
Not not only does the new
system (which will be used in
at least ve Canadian
provinces), provide signicant
enhancements but the BCMMB
says it will result in “signicant
cost savings.”
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 11
Lisa Aylard of Stonehaven Farm and Pat Deakin, the City of Port
Alberni economic development manager and vice-president of the
Islands Agriculture Show board of directors, welcomed visitors to
the Alberni-Clayquot Regional District booth at the IAS trade show
at Cowichan Exhibition Park in Duncan. The Alberni Valley will be
hosting the show in 2017. (Lindsay Chung photo)
by LINDSAY CHUNG
DUNCAN – With this year’s
Islands Agriculture Show (IAS)
being considered another
success, organizers are already
excited to bring the trade
show and conference to Port
Alberni for the rst time in
2017.
This year’s Islands
Agriculture Show, February 12-
13 at the Cowichan Exhibition
Park in Duncan, featured a
trade show with 67 exhibitors
and two days of conference
sessions that looked at
consumer behaviour, market
trends and innovation,
business fundamentals, water
management and new
opportunities for farmers. As
well, the show hosted a sold-
out water storage farm tour,
February 11, which visited a
dairy, vineyard, hobby farm
and mixed vegetable and
livestock operation to examine
how they store water.
Following the tour, a panel
session looked at the design,
construction, operation and
maintenance involved in
undertaking a water storage
project.
“It’s all about educating the
public and providing a venue
for farmers to network,” says
IAS manager Shari Paterson. “I
think the show was a huge
success.”
The show was busy both
days. On Friday, 791 school
children from the Cowichan
Valley visited the show.
Paterson says they probably
had the most sold-out
conference sessions in the
history of the show and
Island ag show business-friendly
REASON 3: Our Alexander Knives, when paired
with our patented Vertical Knives, create an
unparalleled cutting action. The curved carbide
coated cutting edge and angle of the Alexander
Knives increases the aggressiveness of cut
to improve the processing rate of round baled
forages, especially coarser forages. Our Vertical
Knives, which are mounted on our slide plate,
improve processing and feedout of high forage
rations. Together with our four other exclusive
auger features, we produce a faster and more
uniform mix than sluggish conventional augers,
which typically take too long to process forage,
resulting in too many fine particles in the shaker
ALEXANDER KNIVES
VERTICAL KNIVES
SIX REASONS WHY OUR SQUARE-CUT AUGER
RESISTS SORTING:
www.JAYLOR.com | 800.809.8224
SIX REASONS WHY OUR SQUARE-CUT AUGER
RESISTS SORTING:
REASON 3: Our Alexander Knives, when paired
with our patented Vertical Knives, create an
unparalleled cutting action. The curved carbide
coated cutting edge and angle of the Alexander
Knives increases the aggressiveness of cut
to improve the processing rate of round baled
forages, especially coarser forages. Our Vertical
Knives, which are mounted on our slide plate,
improve processing and feedout of high forage
rations. Together with our four other exclusive
auger features, we produce a faster and more
uniform mix than sluggish conventional augers,
which typically take too long to process forage,
resulting in too many fine particles in the shaker
box. Nutritionists say if you want to resist sorting
you’ll need a TMR with optimum shaker box
results, and with a Jaylor you can deliver that
ration every time.
SIX
REASONS WHY
RESISTS SO
R
several of the sessions were
standing room only.
“The most important thing
to us is how the vendors saw
the show, and all the vendors I
just spoke to were thrilled.
One equipment dealer has
sold six tractors. One
insurance agent said he is
booked up for two months. A
company from California came
up and said it’s the best show
they’ve ever attended; they
said it feels like a real
community here with all the
displays and the dairy
classroom. They said it was the
biggest crowd they had
watching their displays ... If the
show was a success for the
vendors, it was a success for
us.”
by LINDSAY CHUNG
DUNCAN – This was the fth Islands Agriculture Show
and the fourth time the show has been hosted in the
Cowichan Valley.
IAS past president Kathy Lachman recalls how the
Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD)’s economic
development division initially brought together
stakeholders from all over Vancouver Island and created a
working group to create an Island-wide agriculture show.
“The timing was right; the CVRD was looking to do an
ag show because it was in our ag plan and the Islands
Forage Committee was looking at folding their operations
because they were just nding it too much. So, they kind
of combined forces with us,” she says.
The IAS board of directors is made up of
representatives from all over Vancouver Island, and the
intention is to move the show around allowing more
people to have the opportunity to take part, explains
Lachman. Last year, IAS moved to the Comox Valley after
three years in the Cowichan Valley.
“We wanted to make sure everybody on Vancouver
Island had an opportunity to experience the show. So
every second year, we’re moving the show around. We
can’t do it every year because the logistics are just
overwhelming.”
Lachman says the IAS will take place in Port Alberni in
2017 then return to the Cowichan Valley the next year,
then to another community in 2019. The rotation also
allows more communities to highlight the farms and
producers in their region. “Farming groups kind of come
together to support the show so we had the farmers’
institute, we had the farmers’ market folks, we had all
dierent kinds of agriculture community groups come
together to support the show,” said Lachman.
In 2017, the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District will
host the IAS February 3-4 at the Glenwood Centre and Fair
Grounds in Port Alberni.
Ag show on the move
TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT LTD.
KAMLOOPS
580 Chilcotin Road
250/851-3101
TOLL FREE
1-888-851-3101
ARMSTRONG
4193 Noble Road
250/546-3141
TOLL FREE
1-800-661-3141
NOBLE
CASE 2290 1980, 128 HP, CAB, NO 3 PT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,500
CASE IH 885 1987, 72 HP, 4X4, CAB LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,500
CASE IH 4694 1986, 219 PTO HP, DUALS 1000 PTO, 4 REMOTES . . 25,500
NH TS115A, DELUXE 2004, 95 HP, CAB 4X4, LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41,800
NH 3045 45 HP, 4X4, CAB, LDR, LIKE NEW ONLY 120 HOURS . . . . . . 36,500
KUBOTA B21 13.5 HP, 4X4, ROLLBAR, LOADER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,500
KUBOTA M5700 2003, 52PTO HP, CAB,4X4, LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29,500
WHITE 6065 63 PTO HP, 4X4, ROPS, ALO 640 LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,500
JD 3130 80 HP, 2X4, CANOPY, JD 148 LOADER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,500
CASE IH 8820 WINDROWER, 1995, C/W 21” DRAPER HEAD . . . . . . . 24,000
CASE IH DCX101 10’4”, 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,900
CASE IH 8312 1997, 12’ CUT, SWIVEL HITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,500
CASE IH DC 92 9’2” CUT, 2 TO CHOOSE FROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,500 | 21,000
CASE IH 8309 1995, 9’2” CUT ROLLER CONDITIONER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,900
NH 1411 2003, 10’4” CUT, RUBBER ROLLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,900
JD 920 1995, 9’9”, CUT, ROLLER CONDITIONER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,500
JD 925 2000, 9’9” CUT, FLAIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,500
HESSTON 1160 12’ HYDROSWING, 1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,950
HESSTON 1320 2000, 9’2” CUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,900
KUHN GA7932 ROTARY TWIN RAKE, NEW IN 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26,000
RECON 300 2012, PULL TYPE HAY CONDITIONER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,800
CASE IH SBX540 Q-TURN, HYD DENSITY, EXTENSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,000
NH BR7090 2012, 5’X6”, TWINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29,500
JD 456 2000, 4’X5’ SILAGE SPECIAL, TWINE & WRAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,900
www.nobletractor.com
WELCOME SPRING!
0000.000.000
aNteertS0000
CAR
THTMIS
moc.etsirelead
emaNnwTo
ema
ROTC
Mahindra 1500 SERIES
WITH LOADER
MAHINDRA 2555
WITH LOADER
#1 SELLING TRACTOR IN THE WORLD!
Mahindra’s mCRD Technology eliminates DPF and DEF.
Call your local dealer to find out more!
HANDLERS EQUIPMENT
Abbotsford
604-850-3601 (225)
AURORA TRUCK CENTRE
Houston
250-845-7600
TRACTOR TIME
Victoria
250-929-2145
Mahindra 1500 SERIES
WITH LOADER
INTRODUCING THE NEW
XTV SERIES
INTRODUCING THE NEW
XTV SERIES
MAHINDRA 2555 WITH LOADER 3–cyl diesel, 4X4, 55HP Hydrostatic Transmission,
3,122 lbs loader lift capacity, no DPF filter required! CASH PRICE $32,800
MAHINDRA 1526
WITH LOADER
1560 LB
LOADER LIFT,
HST
TRANSMISSION
CASH PRICE
$22,000
MAHINDRA 1526
WITH LOADER
1560 LB
LOADER LIFT,
HST
TRANSMISSION
CASH PRICE
$22,000
XTV 750S FLEXHAULER 750cc Kohler Engine, up to 35 MPH, 1200 lbs cargo capacity,
27” ATV tires, Electric power cargo box. LIMITED TIME PRICING $15,500
Country Life in BC • March 201612
February 20
th
Kamloops 1:00pm Annual Pine Butte Ranch Horned Hereford Production Sale
March 5
th
Williams Lake 1:00pm Prime Time Bull Sale & Cutting Edge Cattle Bull Sale
March 8
th
Kamloops Valley Charolais Bull Sale RRTS Charolais
March 12
th
Williams Lake Harvest Angus Bull Sale
March 19
th
Kamloops 12:30pm Angus Advantage Bull Sale
March 21
st
OK Falls All Breeds Bull Sale
March 26
th
Vanderhoof 1:00pm Northern Alliance Black & Red Angus Bull Sale
April 2
nd
Williams Lake 1:00pm Best Bet Bull Sale, Mitchell Cattle Co. & Guest
April 9
th
Vanderhoof 12:00pm All Breeds Bull Sale
April 14 & 15
th
Williams Lake Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale
ll
S
a
le
Tuesday
January 26
th
Kamloops is
hosting a complete
herd dispersal of
350 bred cows for
Bar M Ranch
BCL
BCL
2016
Equipment Sales
MAY 7
WILLIAMS LAKE
MAY 15
KAMLOOPS
March 5 Williams Lake 1 pm Prime Time Bull Sale & Cutting Edge Cattle Bull Sale
March 8 Kamloops 12:30 Charolais Bull Sale RRTS Charolais
March 12 Williams Lake Harvest Angus Bull Sale
March 19 Kamloops 12:30 pm Angus Advantage Bull Sale
March 21 OK Falls 12:30 All Breeds Bull Sale
March 26 Vanderhoof 1 pm Northern Alliance Black & Red Angus Bull Sale
April 2 Williams Lake 1 pm Best Bet Bull Sale, Mitchell Cattle Co. & Guest
April 5 Kamloops 12 pm Langenegger Cattle Co Red Angus Bull Sale
April 9 Vanderhoof 12 pm All Breeds Bull Sale
April 14-15 Williams Lake 11 am Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 13
Tapping into Asian blueberry market jam-packed with challenges
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
It is taking a
lot longer than expected to
get into China and Korea but
BC Blueberry Council
executive director Debbie
Etsell continues to push their
potential as export markets for
BC blueberries.
Although MOU’s with China
and Korea were signed last
September, protocols are still
being nalized, she told
growers at the Pacic
Agriculture Show, January 30.
“China is a growing market
for blueberries,” she says,
pointing out Chilean blueberry
exports to China have
increased from just 200 tonnes
in 2012 to 4,000 tonnes last
year.
Not only does China’s 1.4
billion population make it a
massive potential market but
BC already has a built-in
advantage over many of its
competitors.
“China already knows
Vancouver. That’s a marketing
advantage we don’t have to
work on,” Etsell says.
Korea may not have as
huge a population but also
oers potential. It has limited
local production so must look
to imports to sate its growing
appetite for blueberries.
“Koreans eat a lot of fruit
and they love smoothies,”
Etsell says, noting the demand
for blueberries has
skyrocketed since they were
featured on a popular local TV
show.
In fact, says California
blueberry marketing
consultant Tom Payne, South
Korea is now the largest frozen
blueberry market for the US.
“There has been over 100%
growth in our Korean market
since 2010 and it has now
surpassed Japan,” he says,
noting Japan remains the
largest fresh market, taking
over half of the US fresh
market blueberry exports.
Packers interested in
exploiting the opportunities in
the Far East must meet China
and Korea’s phytosanitary
requirements. Each country
sets its own requirements but
it is the Canadian Food
Inspection Agency which
issues the export certicates,
says CFIA horticulture
program specialist Barbara
Peterson.
Growers and packers
needed to apply to the CFIA
by mid-February to be
considered. Both the packing
plant and the eld(s) their
berries come from need to be
registered with CFIA on an
annual basis and growers and
packers need to sign a
ompliance agreement with the
CFIA.
To qualify to export to
China and Korea, packing
houses need to be GAP-
certied, have pest exclusion
devices (such as insect screens
or automatic doors) in place,
provide complete product
traceability to the eld, handle
approved fruit separately, use
forced air cooling and test for
SWD. The packing line can
have automated equipment
but must also include trained
hand sorting to ensure all
contaminants are removed.
The plant must also provide
CFIA inspectors with a
dedicated work area as they
must be present when
shipments are being wrapped.
Growers must maintain
complete pesticide and
monitoring records and hire a
third-party IPM consultant to
do the monitoring. Early
season IPM must be
completed by the rst week of
May.
BC Ministry of Agriculture
berry specialist Carolyn
Teasdale said the IPM
consultant needs to provide
eld maps and monitor for all
pests of concern, including
SWD, mummy berry, cherry and
cranberry fruit worm, rhagoletis,
leaf rollers (Korea) and fruit rot
(China). There is a 2% limit on
mummy berries and a 5% limit
on leafrollers. They also need to
look for blueberry maggots but
hopefully won’t nd any as
there is zero tolerance for the
pest.
“If we nd blueberry
maggot, the program gets
suspended,” Peterson stressed.
The IPM consultant must
monitor elds weekly from
pink tip to the end of the
harvest and need to inspect at
least one to two plants per
acre, with a minimum of 12
plants per eld.
First found in BC blueberry
elds ve years ago, cherry
fruit worms have now spread
throughout the Fraser Valley,
with the highest populations
in Ladner and Port Coquitlam.
BCMA entomologist Tracy
Hueppelsheuser told growers
to set at least one trap per 20
acres, and start searching for
eggs as soon as they trap at
least six moths. That was the
case in 10 of the 28 elds the
BCMA monitored for cherry
fruit worm last year.
“Start a spray program as
soon as you nd eggs,” she
said.
Teasdale says cranberry fruit
worm has become a major
pest in other blueberry areas
but has to date only been
found in a few selected
cranberry elds in BC.
Even though the conditions
these markets impose may be
onerous for growers and
packers, Payne says they have
“no choice” but to pursue
these markets.
“We have a billion pounds
of blueberries to move.”
A Firsthand
Understanding
Of Your Familys
Wealth Priorities
Mark Driediger, CFP, Senior Wealth Advisor
Assante Financial Management Ltd.
www.MarkDriediger.com | (604) 859-4890
Farm Transition Coaching
Customized Portfolio Strategy
Retirement Income Planning
Please visit www.assante.com/legal.jsp or contact Assante at 1-800-268-3200
f
or in
f
ormation with respect
to important
l
ega
l
an
d
regu
l
atory
d
isc
l
osures re
l
ating to t
h
is notice.
Your Farm. Your Family. Your Future.
BC Ministry of
Agriculture berry
specialist Carolyn
Teasdale,
Canadian Food
Inspection Agency
horticulture
program specialist
Barbara Peterson
and BC Blueberry
Council executive
director Debbie
Etsell.
(David Schmidt
photo)
To qualify to export to China and Korea, packing
houses need to be GAP‑certified, have pest exclusion
devices (such as insect screens or automatic doors)
in place, provide complete product traceability to
the field, handle approved fruit separately,
and use forced air cooling and test for SWD.
Country Life in BC • March 201614
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
The
Mexican consulate is pulling
back some of the services it
has provided to the Seasonal
Agricultural Workers Program.
In a mid-January letter to all
participating employers, the
consulate announced it
intends to stop assisting with
processing the Labour Market
Impact Assessment (LMIA) and
meeting workers at the airport
when they arrive.
To obtain SAWP workers,
employers must rst submit an
LMIA to Service Canada
detailing the workers required,
the tasks they will be
performing and amount they
will be paid. Once an LMIA was
approved, it has been
forwarded to the consulate
which would translate and
reformat the requisition to
Mexican Ministry of Labour
specications.
When workers arrive at the
Vancouver Airport, a consulate
representative would meet
them in the airport’s secure
area to assist their processing
by the Canadian Border
Services Agency.
The consulate in Vancouver
has been providing these
services at no charge to BC
employers but has not been
oering the same services in
other Canadian provinces.
To ll the gap, the BC
Agriculture Council is reviving
the Western Agricultural
Labour Initiative (WALI) and
contracting Mi Terra Holidays
to provide some of those
services.
WALI was formed to
coordinate the program when
SAWP was introduced to BC
but has been largely dormant
in the past decade. It is still a
BCAC subcommittee but BCAC
executive director Reg Ens
expects the council will now
make it a stand-alone
company.
Under the new system,
approved LMIA’s will go to
WALI, which will forward them
to
Mi Terra for translating and
reformatting. While that takes
care of the LMIA issue, Ens
admits meeting workers at the
airport is a more delicate
situation. While Mi Terra is
willing to meet the workers,
the CBSA is reluctant to allow
private individuals into the
airport’s secure area.
“Mexico was the only
consulate allowed into the
Mexican consulate withdraws services: SAWP
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD The federal government has
expanded the list of designated regions where
livestock farmers and ranchers can get tax
deferrals for 2015 as a result of last year’s
droughts.
Livestock tax deferral allows producers in
prescribed regions who are facing feed
shortages to defer a portion of their 2015 sale
proceeds of breeding livestock until the next
year. The cost of replacing the animals in the
next year osets the deferred income, thereby
reducing the tax burden associated with the
original sale. Eligible producers can request the
tax deferral when ling their 2015 income tax
returns.
“Extreme weather created diculties for
Western Canada’s livestock industry last
summer. Tax deferrals can help producers
reduce their losses and focus on rebuilding
their herds for the coming year,” agriculture
and agrifood minister Lawrence MacAulay said.
A preliminary list of drought-aected
regions was released last July and updated in
early February.
BC areas which have been added include
census divisions A to G in the Bulkley-Nechako,
Cariboo census subdivisions A, B, C, D, F, H and
I, census subdivisions C to F in the Columbia-
Shuswap, Kitimat-Stikine census subdivision B,
North Okanagan census subdivision F and
census subdivisions A, B, L, O and P in
Thompson-Nicola.
Drought prompts tax deferrals
The measure of success.
604-864-2273
34511 VYE ROAD
ABBOTSFORD
STORE HOURS
MONDAY-FRIDAY, 8-5
SATURDAY CLOSED til March
MCCORMICK CX105
MFD CAB TRACTOR
$28,900
JD 7450 PRODRIVE SPFH
4X4 KP, 10' GRASS PU,
676 6 ROW CORNHEAD
CALL FOR PRICING.
JD 7400 SPFH
4X4, KP 10’ GRASS PICKUP,
JD 686 6 ROW CORNHEAD
CALL FOR PRICING
JOHN DEERE 3600 PLOW
5 BOTTOM, DRAWBAR PULL
$4,100
CLAAS 870T TEDDER
28.5’ HYD. FOLD
CALL FOR DETAILS
NH 315
SMALL SQUARE BALER
CALL FOR DETAILS
PZ FANEX 730
6 BASKET 24’ TEDDER $3,900
CLAAS 1550 ROTARY RAKE
TWIN BASKET SIDE DELIVERY
$17,900
CLAAS 780L
CENTER DELIVERY
ROTARY RAKE
$10,500
Pre-owned
Tractors &
Equipment
www.caliberequipment.ca
secure area,” Ens notes.
Although a Mi Terra
employee was once allowed
into the secure area, he says
CBSA does not want it to
become a common practice as
it would set a dangerous
precedent. Instead, Mi Terra
has been meeting the workers
as they exit the secure area
and in the process have
developed a good relationship
with CBSA’s front counter sta.
“CBSA sta know they can
count on Mi Terra for
assistance if needed,” Ens says.
The Mexican consulate has
set a deadline of April 1 for the
new arrangements and Ens
hopes WALI and Mi Terra will
be ready to take over well
before that.
“Hopefully, it will be
seamless for employers,” he
says.
It may be seamless but it will
no longer be free although the
fees have not yet been set.
There is also another
change in SAWP procedures,
that involving the issuance of
Canadian social insurance
numbers to new workers. In
the past the CBSA had been
issuing SIN’s to workers upon
arrival at the airport but have
stopped doing that. Instead,
workers must now appear in
person at a Service Canada
oce to obtain their SIN.
“We have developed a
protocol with SC for handling a
busload of non-English
speaking workers and it’s
working well,” Ens says.
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 15
by JUDIE STEEVES
KELOWNA – A number of
industry awards were
announced and presented
during the 127th annual
convention of the BC Fruit
Growers Association in late
January.
Brian and Dorothy
Witzke, apple
growers who live in
Kelowna, were made
life members of the
association.
Both have been
involved in the
industry for decades,
with Brian working in
horticulture and
Dorothy on the
business side of
farming.
He was part of the initial
visit to Europe, learning about
high density planting
techniques for apples, while
Dorothy participated in
accounting forums and
workshops for growers. As
well, Brian has been a
delegate to the BCFGA
conventions and member of
the province’s Tree Fruit
Production Insurance
Advisory Committee, while
Dorothy was involved in the
BC Farm Women’s Network,
reported BCFGA general
manager Glen Lucas.
Today, the family is
involved in replanting, with
the involvement of their son
in the business.
Also named life members
were Wilf and Sally Mennell of
Cawston, who were away in
Europe promoting the
Ambrosia apple at Fruit
Logistica, a unique global
event for the produce
industry which attracted
70,000 trade visitors from 130
countries – a new attendance
record.
The Mennells are best
known as discoverers
of the Ambrosia
apple, which grew as
a chance seedling in
their orchard. They
realized the potential
and have been
tireless supporters
and promoters of the
new variety, investing
time and resources in
marketing the brand.
Although he also
wasn’t available to receive it,
Kamlesh Parmar of Kelowna
was also named a BCFGA life
member for his work as a
director of the BC Tree Fruit
Co-op and for expanding his
acreage of high density apple
plantings. He was also active
for many years as a delegate
to the BCFGA conventions.
Award of meric
An award of Merit was
presented to scientist Cheryl
Hampson who retires this year
from her post as plant breeder
at the Summerland Research
and Development Centre.
Crossing and selecting new
varieties of tree fruits is a long-
term project, and her focus
and consistency “have been
good for lling the pipeline
with many promising new
varieties, as well as
Long time orchardists recognized by their industry
Retiring Summerland scientist Cheryl Hampson, Country Life writer Tom Walker also honoured
completing the work on
varieties released during her
tenure, such as the Aurora,
Golden Gala, Nicola and Salish
apples and the Starblush and
Suite Note cherries,”
commented Lucas.
“She has played an
important role in the
continuity of the apple and
cherry breeding program,” he
noted.
The BCFGA Press Award
was won this year by Tom
Walker, who writes for Country
Life in BC, as well as Western
Producer and local Okanagan
media on topics such as
genetically-engineered apples
and the Columbia River
Treaty.
Tom Walker
BCFGA executive member Denise MacDonald, far left, presents an award of merit to retiring scientist
Cheryl Hampson, while apple growers Brian and Dorothy Witzke admire a commemorative plaque
presented along with a lifetime membership to the BCFGA. (Judie Steeves photo)
Roll-over protective
structures (ROPS)
and seatbelts
save lives
We’re working with you to make sure all farmers go
home safe. For resources and videos on safe equipment
operation, visit worksafebc.com/agriculture.
*Offer valid from February 1, 2016 to June 30, 2016 on select new models, financed by Cat Financial, manufactured by Caterpillar Inc. Building Construction Products Division only at participating Cat dealers. Offer is available to customers in Canada only and
cannot be combined with any other offers. Subject to machine availability. Machines sold in Canada by authorized dealers are priced in Canadian dollars and the price may take into account the exchange rate of Canadian dollars to U.S. dollars. Models shown do
not necessarily reflect the exact model and configuration to which the promotion applies. Rebates of $1,350 CAD paid as a Cat Financial Commercial Account credit for BCP Core and $650 CAD credit for CCE machines. Trade rebates are based on a predetermined
amount and may vary by model and will be in addition to the dealer appraised trade-in value. All financed machines are subject to credit approval and rate may differ based on creditworthiness. The Cat Financial Commercial Account credit applies to all BCP
models and is provided through Cat Financial for use at participating Cat dealers. Prices do not include taxes, freight, set-up, delivery, document fees, inspections, additional options, or attachments. Final machine prices are subject to change. Offer may change
without prior notice and additional terms and conditions may apply. Contact your Finning sales rep for full details.
GET UP TO
To learn more about the HUGE TRADE REBATES OR LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE WHEN YOU PURCHASE YOUR NEXT CAT
®
COMPACT MACHINE, contact your Finning sales rep or drop by your local Finning dealer today. Offer available until June 30th.
OR
0.9%
FOR 60 MONTHS
*
UP TO $1350 IN DEALER
CREDIT APPLIED TO
YOUR CAT
®
FINANCIAL
COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT
$30,500
IN TRADE REBATES
*
GET UP TO
UP TO $1350 IN DEALER
CREDIT APPLIED TO
YOUR CAT
®
FINANCIAL
COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT
Country Life in BC • March 201616
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 17
by JUDIE STEEVES
KELOWNA – Incumbent
president Fred Steele of
Kelowna was re-elected to
head up the BC Fruit Growers
Association at a lively
convention in Kelowna in late
January, marking the 127th
annual meeting of the
producer group.
Nearly 200 growers
attended and registered to
vote in the fourth contest
between Vernon grower Jeet
Dukhia and Steele. About 500
growers are members of the
association.
Dukhia beat out Steele in
2013, but was defeated by
him in 2014 and 2015.
BCFGA general manager
Glen Lucas promised
delegates he would bring in a
proposal for a multi-year term
for president to provide
stability for the organization
going forward.
Elected by acclamation to
the executive were:
incumbent vice-president
Pinder Dhaliwal along with
Ravinder Bains, Deep Brar and
Peter Simonsen from the
south and Surjit Nagra,
Sukhdev Goraya and Tony
Nijjar from the north.
In his pre-election speech,
Steele promised growers he
would work together with all
sectors in the industry for the
benet of growers and oered
an optimistic vision of the
industry’s future. Optimism,
he said, has a tendency to
bring about “good things.”
He also said he is working
on improvements to the
production insurance
program to better protect
cherry growers and he is
working on permitting bare
ground to be included in the
government’s replant
program which is designed to
assist growers with the high
cost of putting in new trees to
replace older, less-protable
varieties.
That program has been
over-subscribed in its rst two
years but last year, the BCFGA
was successful in having some
money moved from the
seventh year of the program
to add to the rst year.
Summerland Varieties
Corporation also provided
funds to help ensure more
eligible growers were able to
participate. In the end, only
three growers who applied
were not funded, reported
Lucas.
Agriculture ministry apple
specialist Carl Withler
reported to delegates that a
total of 200 acres were
replanted in the rst year, 80%
to apples and 15% to cherries.
Surprise development
The new general manager
of the SVC also addressed
delegates. Frank Kappel
retired recently from his post
breeding new cherry varieties
at the Summerland Research
and Development Centre and
told delegates that sales of
cider apples have been a
surprise development this
year for the corporation.
“We’re the only supplier of
such apples for the craft cider
industry,” he noted.
As well, the plant variety
rights management company
owned by the BCFGA is
enhancing its eorts to
protect the interests of variety
owners. Those owners expect
a return on their investment
so SVC has to enforce variety
rights in order to continue to
attract new variety owners, he
explained.
He also noted rights to the
popular Ambrosia apple, a
chance discovery by
Similkameen orchardists Wilf
and Sally Mennell, expired last
year, meaning trees budded
or grafted last year still have a
patent. He also said the US
patent on Ambrosia, which
has limited the number of
plantings in that country,
expires in 2017.
Growers fear there could be
an explosion in plantings of
that variety after that, which is
likely to impact the high
returns currently enjoyed by
Ambrosia growers here.
Growers were warned it’s
important they learn to grow
the best quality Ambrosias in
order to compete.
Ambrosia growers are
being asked this spring to
vote in favour of approving a
levy to allow marketing of the
brand in order that premium
pricing can continue.
Kappel said the SVC board
has okayed hiring a marketing
and business person to work
part of the time with Ambrosia
as long as there is grower
support for the continued
levy.
Third term for Steele as
BC fruit growers president
Expiry of patent rights could increase competition for Ambrosia growers
Proudly certifying
Producers and Processors
within BC and Alberta.
FVOPA provides year round certification
services compliant with the Canadian
Organic Standards (CAN/CGSB) and
in accordance with the BC Certified
Organic ISO 17065 recognized program.
Products may be sold Canada-wide and
in international markets. FVOPA ensures an
efficient, professional certification process
for all farm, processing and handling
operations. Inspectors are lOlA trained
and qualified making FVOPA a leading
Certification Agency.
Message 604-607-1655
Email: admin@fvopa.ca
www.fvopa.ca
Phone 604-789-7586
P.O. Box 18591
Delta, BC V4K 4V7
Phone: 778-434-3070 Admin cell: 604-789-7586
PO Box 19052 Email: admin@fvopa.ca
Delta, BC V4L2P8 www.fvopa.ca
Defending his position of BCFGA president, Fred Steele places his
voter card in the ballot box at the BCFGA convention in Kelowna,
January 31. (Judie Steeves photo)
Consistant spreading.
Quality forage.
“Serving British Columbia proudly since 1946
Machinery
Limited
ROLLINS
R
Chilliwack – 1.800.242.9737, 44725 Yale Road W
Langley – 1.800.665.9060, 21869, 56
th
Avenue
2 YEAR
FACTORY WARRANTY
ON ALL EQUIPMENT
HIT 8.91 Tedder
Asymmetric tines sweep up all of the crop
Patented MULTITAST system oers unrivalled ground following
Robust DYNATECH Rotors designed for dicult conditions
Even spread thanks to high tine to rotor ratio
Country Life in BC • March 201618
by JUDIE STEEVES
KELOWNA – Agri-tourism within the Agricultural
Land Reserve and genetically modified applies
were hot topics at the BC Fruit Growers Association
convention in January.
Among the guest speakers was Kim Grout, the
Agricultural Land Commission’s new chief
executive officer, who told delegates she grew up
in a farm family, noting she is an agrologist as well
as a planner, with experience in civic government
in Pitt Meadows, Maple Ridge and Abbotsford.
She responded to questions from growers about
the role of agri-tourism on ALR land, noting the
commission is working to clarify the regulations.
What’s important, she said, is to understand the
impact the agri-tourism component is having on
the validity of farming: is it just to augment active
farming on the parcel?
Farms with RV parks on them
Kelowna grower Sam Di Maria said there used to
be six farms with RV parks on them within a short
tractor ride of his orchard; of those, four no longer
have fruit trees on them, even though they’re in
the ALR.
“They’re pseudo-farms,” he said.
“It doesn’t take long for the land-owner to
realize the farm doesn’t make
the money the RV business
makes. He keeps it green to
retain his tax classification but
the intention is being
subverted,” he said.
He was quick to note he
was not referring to cideries
or meaderies, which are
related to farming.
“I have an issue with the
income being mentioned,” said delegate Amarjit
Lalli. “If I’m actively farming, I’ll never make more
money than in agritourism and I don’t see why that
should be a problem as long as we protect the
farm and it’s being farmed, and I’m making a living.
We shouldn’t be using words like augmenting or
subsidizing farming,” he added.
The comment period on a discussion paper on
agritourism on ALR land released last fall by the
provincial agriculture ministry ended January 15.
Legislative changes are expected this spring.
Grout also told delegates data is now online so
people can apply and track their requests online,
and they’re working to digitize historic data as
well.
Efforts are also being made to reduce processing
time and to keep everyone informed, she said.
Compliance and monitoring is being enhanced
and more resources requested from the provincial
government. Instead of two officers, she said they
need five or six.
Mandatory labelling
Controversy also erupted at the convention
regarding the advent of genetically-modified
apples. In the end, delegates passed a resolution
calling for government to de-register the Arctic
apple (a genetically-modified product recently
approved by the federal government) and place a
moratorium on future GE tree fruit pending
scientific research and trade and consumer
impacts, and that growers not be compensated for
de-registration if those apples were planted after
November 10, 2015.
They also approved a resolution calling for
mandatory labelling of genetically-modified fruits
and vegetables.
A perennial resolution regarding damage
sustained in orchards by deer was also approved,
calling on senior governments to address the
growth in urban deer populations and the damage
incurred by agriculture. It was also resolved that
the association request nuisance deer hunting
permits be available in the Okanagan to help
control populations.
by SUSAN MCIVER
SUMMERLAND – Frank
Kappel has been named the
new general manager of the
Summerland
Varieties
Corporation.
Kappel served as
interim general
manager for six
months prior to his
appointment,
eective last
November.
In addition to a
national
perspective, Kappel
brings an international
reputation as a scientist and a
long association with SVC to
his new position.
Raised on a fruit farm in
Niagara-on-the Lake, ON,
Kappel earned a PhD in
horticultural science from the
University of Guelph.
Upon graduation, he
worked as a horticulturist in
Ontario, including on a pear
breeding program.
Subsequently, Kappel was
the lead scientist on the
sweet cherry breeding
program at the Pacic Agri-
Food Research Centre in
Summerland which released a
number of successful cultivars
now being grown around the
world.
Comparing his duties as
general manager to those as
scientist, Kappel says, “Here it
is business. SVC is interested
in growers making money.”
Kappel has been was
involved with SVC as a plant
breeder since its
inception in 1993.
Owned by the
BC Fruit Growers’
Association, SVC
commercializes
fruit varieties both
domestically and
internationally by
managing
intellectual
property rights and
supporting product
development and testing.
SVC works collaboratively
with industry partners in 15
countries.
The corporation also
operates a virus-free
budwood orchard and
provides extension services.
Kappel’s goals include
continuing the development
of SVC’s test orchard in Oliver,
increasing eorts to promote
fruit brands and working with
overseas partners who want
to expand their plantings of
SVC licensed varieties while
ensuring that Canadian
growers are not impacted.
Reecting on the
challenging, multifaceted
nature of his position, Kappel
says, “In the end it’s all about
people and dealing with them
fairly.”
Kappel takes the helm of
Summerland Varieties Corp
Kim Grout
Frank Kappel
DEALER INFO AREA
Af
A fA fA f
A f
unn
unnunn
unn
nn
n
y ty t
y t
y t
y t
y
hinhin
hin
hin
hin
g hg hg hg h
g h
appappappapp
app
ensensens
ens
ens
whwh
wh
wh
wh
en en
en
en
en
en
youyouyou
you
you
o
tetete
te
te
st st
st
st
s
st
dri
dri
dri
dri
dri
d
ve ve ve
ve
ve
a Ka Ka K
aK
a K
K
IOTIOT
IOT
OT
IOT
IOT
IOT
II
I
I
I
I
®
®
®
®
WUDWUD
WUD
WUD
WUD
FWR
FWR
FWRFWR
FWR
UIUIUI
UI
UI
RURU
RU
RU
RU
WKHWKH
WKH
WKH
WKH
ȴUȴUȴU
ȴU
ȴU
VW
VW
VWVWVW
WLP
WLP
WLPWLP
WLP
HHH
H
H
$O
$O$O$O
$O
OWOWOW
OW
OW
KRVKRV
KRV
KRV
KRV
RV
HWHWHWHW
HW
W
KRXKRXKRXKRX
KRX
R
X
JKW
JKW
JKWJKWJKW
V\V\V\
V\
V\
RXRXRXRX
RX
KDGKDGKDGKDG
KDG
DER
DERDER
DER
DER
XWXWXWXW
XW
EX\
EX\EX\EX\
EX\
LQJ
LQJ
LQJLQJ
LQJ
DQDQDQ
DQ
DQ
RWKRWKRWKRWK
RWK
HUHUHU
HU
HU
EUDEUDEUD
EUD
EUD
QGQGQG
QG
QG
SHSH
SHSH
SH
UKD
UKDUKDUKD
UKD
SV
SV
SV
SV
SV
RQHRQH
RQHRQH
RQH
PRPR
PR
PR
PR
UHUHUH
UH
UH
H
ȊID
ȊID
ȊIDȊID
ID
PRX
PRX
PRXPRX
PRX
ȋ
GLVGLVGLV
GLV
GLV
DSSDSS
DSS
DSS
DSS
HDUHDU
HDU
HDU
HDU
$$
$
$
$
QGQGQG
QG
QG
VXG
VXG
VXG
VXG
VXG
GHQGHQ
GHQ
GHQGHQ
O\O\O\
O\O\
WK
WK
WK
WK
WK
HRHRHRHR
HR
QO\QO\QO\QO\
QO\
WUWU
WU
WU
U
DFW
DFW
DFW
DFW
DFW
RURU
RU
U
\RX\RX\RX
\RX
\RX
ȇOOȇOOȇOO
ȇOO
OO
HYHY
HY
HY
HY
HUHUHU
HU
HU
EX\EX\
EX\
EX\
EX\
LV
LV
LV
LV
D
D
D
D
D
.,2
.,2
.,2
2
.,2
7,
7,
7,7,
7,
© 20© 20© 20
©20
©20
15 15
15
5
15
15
KIOTKIOTKIOT
KIOT
KIOT
I
I
II
I
TraTra
Tra
ra
Tra
ctorctor
ctor
ctor
tor
ComCom
Com
Com
Com
panypany
panypany
pany
a Da Da D
a D
aD
ivisivis
ivis
ivis
ivis
ionion
on
ion
ion
of Dof Dof Dof D
of D
aedo
aedo
aedo
aedo
aed
ng-U
ng-Ung-U
ng-U
ng-U
SA,
SA,
SA,
SA,
SA,
Inc.
Inc.
Inc.
Inc.
Inc
Kioti.com
PX Series
change
your
mind.
power
The
to
YOUR BC KIOTI DEALERS
ABBOTSFORD Matsqui Ag Repair ................... 604-826-3281 www.matsquiagrepair.com
VERNON Timberstar Tractor ................... 250-545-5441 www.timberstar.ca
DUNCAN Harbour City Equipment .......... 778-422-3376 www.harbourequipment.com
PRINCE GEORGE Northern Acreage Supply Ltd... 250-596-2273 www.northernacreage.ca
Agri-tourism conflicts, non-browning apple debated at AGM
Land commission CEO says legislative changes this spring will address agri-tourism issues
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 19
by EMILY BULMER
SMITHERS – Counting your
chickens has never been
easier and the participants of
the “Technologies for Small
Farm Businesses” workshop
learned there is an app for
that – and just about anything
else you want to track on a
farm.
The winter workshop
showed producers the tools
available to track livestock
needs and vet appointments,
nances, as well as how to
reach customers through
social media and online
marketplaces such as Kijiji.
The workshop tour made
stops in Terrace, Smithers, Fort
St James, Vanderhoof, Prince
George and Dunster.
Workshop facilitator
Diandra Oliver shared her
experience as co-founder of
Home Sweet Home Grocery, a
now fully-online food
enterprise based in Prince
George. Using technology
transformed Oliver’s approach
to business and now she is
teaching others how it is
done.
“We started with a
storefront in 2014 and closed
our storefront in June 2015.
We wanted to free up time to
participate in economic
development projects and
found that owning a
storefront was a real barrier to
working in the community
because we were sitting in the
store. We also found that ...
most people had access to a
cell phone or internet and
that they could connect with
us online,” Oliver says.
Since many of their
customers were already
connecting to the business
online, making the switch
from storefront to online
ordering and delivery was a
smooth transition.
“For the amount (of
business) that we do
compared to before, it is more
protable for us to be online.
It is the best business model
for us and using technology
creates opportunities for
doing business in new ways
with very little overhead.”
A large part of the
workshop was a self-
assessment process in which
participants evaluated their
needs and current technology
know-how. Taking into
account internet access, cell
service, wi capability and
comfort with mobile devices
was also part of the process.
“Use technology that works
within your current capability
and price range and use
something that matches your
cell/wireless access,” Oliver
says. “Take a useful approach.”
Program demos
Oliver used examples to
demonstrate the types of
programs available.
“‘Farm at Hand’ is a free
multi-platform farm
management tool that tracks
all your farm inputs. You can
map your farm, track your
outputs and manage farm
machinery.
“‘Pick Up the Milk’ is a free
task management tool that is
easy to use. You can send
yourself or other workers on
the farm reminders ... and
track the amount of work it
takes you to do certain tasks.
It is integrated into Outlook or
Google Calendars so it is also
easy to track and share things
like vet appointments.”
Oliver also discussed on-
farm traceability for certain
There’s an
app for that
Farm meets technology in workshop series
products and how
spreadsheets can be used to
help keep track of on farm
processes.
The workshops were well
received and participants
responded enthusiastically to
the new information.
“(The workshops) went
really well... There is a wide
range of technology, needs
and access. I did a lot of
trouble shooting and in-depth
planning with the participants
They all have dierent
technology needs because
they have so many dierent
businesses.”
Oliver was also able to
tailor the workshops on the
spot.
“The workshops were
heavier on branding and
social media than I expected.
Participants were really
interested in export markets
out of the region and how to
reach customers through
Facebook and Kijiji. As
farming and the northern
economy changes, producers
in agriculture have a lot of
positive opportunity to build
markets, build brands, reach
customers, learn new things
and try new ways of doing
business for themselves. It was
great to be able to share my
experiences.”
The workshop was made
available through Beyond the
Market. Oliver’s blog post on
technology as well as a link to
the assessment tool is
available at
[http://beyondthemarket.ca/c
ategory/announcements/].
Check their website
[http://beyondthemarket.ca/e
vents/] for upcoming
workshops.
Facilitator Diandra Oliver, sitting right, introduced central interior farmers to a variety of apps and
technology available to enhance their farm operations. (Emily Bulmer photo)
The 3PH Box Scraper by MK
Martin provides both small
and large property owners with
affordable options for grading
with their line of box scrapers.
For more information on grading, scraping and leveling products contact MK Martin.
These rugged land movers
come in a range of sizes from 8
to 12 feet and feature a variety of
options ensuring the right con-
figuration for your needs.
This two in one combination of
leveling and scraping makes
short work of your grading and
leveling jobs. Available mounts
for skid loaders and 3PH.
Note: Models may not be exactly as shown.
www.canadianorganicfeeds.com
FOR QUALITY
CERTIFIED
ORGANIC
FEEDS
FOR BAGGED or BULK ORDERS:
Darren Jansen
General Manager
604/794-3701
organicfeeds@gmail.com
CUSTOM ORDERS
Certified to Canadian National Standards
If farm debt is keeping you awake at night,
it’s OK to ask for help.
Financial counselling or mediation may be the solution.
The Farm Debt Mediation Service helps farmers overcome nancial difculties
by offering nancial counselling and mediation services.
This free and condential service helps Canadian farmers get their debt repayment
back on track. Financial advisors and qualied mediators help nd a mutually acceptable
repayment arrangement between farmers and their creditors.
For more information on how the Farm Debt Mediation Service can help you:
Call: 1-866-452-5556 Visit: www.agr.gc.ca/fdms
Country Life in BC • March 201620
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 21
Biosolids, manure applications continue to stir Interior controversy
Activists claim biosolids are an “odiferous smoothie of everything cities pour down their drains”
by PETER MITHAM
SUMMERLAND – Residents
of several Interior communities
are raising a stink over the
potential health threats from
soil amendments derived from
both bovine and human
sources.
They’re not keen on the
dung deals, which are
muddying the waters of
neighbourliness in
Spallumcheen and Clinton.
Biosolids – in plain
language, a processed form of
municipal sewage generated
during waste water treatment
– have long been used as a soil
amendment and are deemed
non-toxic.
However, the rich dark
matter has struck fear into
several communities
throughout the Interior,
including Peachland and
Vernon, which are skeptical of
government assurances that
the substance isn’t harmful.
Directors of the Capital
Regional District have had an
outright ban on the use of
biosolids since 2012.
The province encourages
precautions on the o-chance
pathogens remain even after
processing, something that
unsettles activists such as
Amanda Bourgeois of Friends
of the Nicola Valley.
“We’re not convinced we’re
being given the truth about
the safety of it,” Bourgeois told
the Vancouver Sun in January,
following a spill of biosolids
heading from an Okanagan
treatment facility to the OK
Cattle Co. ranch near Clinton.
Bourgeois said the province
has failed to provide safety
reports on biosolids,
something that has fuelled
speculation that the substance
isn’t, in fact, safe.
Indeed, activists were
concerned enough to
purchase advertising space in
Country Life in BC this past
January claiming that biosolids
are “an odiferous smoothie of
everything cities pour down
their drains.”
The Canadian Water
Network supported a two-year
study led by Gordon Price, an
assistant professor of
agriculture at Dalhousie
University, and backed by the
Nova Scotia and Ontario
governments to study
biosolids and their impact.
The researchers have yet to
issue their report but it aims to
provide “an understanding of
potential long-term
environmental impacts
associated with alkaline
stabilized biosolids” and to
“inform the development of
government policies on
biosolids management in
agriculture, as well as food
safety monitoring.”
While the US Environmental
Protection Agency continues
to review its standards, most
recently examining the
presence of pharmaceutical
residues in sewage, it has long
maintained that “when
properly treated and
processed, sewage sludge
becomes biosolids; the
nutrient-rich organic materials
resulting from the treatment
of domestic sewage in a
wastewater treatment facility.”
The agency happily
maintains that biosolids are a
cost-eective fertilizer that
improves and maintains
productive soils and
stimulates plant growth.
However, it notes: “Eective
sewage sludge and biosolids
management options help
ensure that useful materials
are recycled on land and
harmful materials are not
released to water bodies.”
It’s water that’s at the heart
of the other running battle
over soil amendments in the
Interior.
Interior Health Authority
ocials have received a formal
request to impose a
moratorium on the HS Jansen
dairy farm’s practice of
spreading liquid manure on its
elds.
The elds sit above an
aquifer serving the Steele
Springs Water District, which
supplies approximately 160
people. The farm is home to
1,000 head of dairy cattle.
Residents have been ghting
for protection of the aquifer,
which has seen nitrate levels
spike since the farm moved in.
The farm was told last
spring to not spray euent
following concern by the local
water district regarding nitrate
levels. That moratorium lasted
for the 2015 growing season
and aimed to allow the district
time to seek funding for a
comprehensive study of the
aquifer and possible methods
of addressing contamination.
Two aquifers supplying the
water district have frequently
tested positive for nitrates at
rates surpassing twice the
maximum allowable limit for
drinking water of 10 parts per
million (ppm).
This prompted the Interior
Health Authority to impose a
“do not drink” order on the
water district in March 2014
and since then, nitrate levels
have uctuated between 10.4
and 12.7 ppm. Nitrate levels
increased to 13.5 ppm in
December 2015 before settling
back to 12.8 ppm in January.
This has prompted Victoria
law student Rachel Gutman
and legal director Calvin
Sandborn of the
Environmental Law Centre at
the University of Victoria to ask
the Interior Health Authority to
place a moratorium on liquid
manure spreading at the
Jansen farm after years of
water quality advisories.
Gutman and Sandborn also
allege that the province was
slow to disclose information
regarding contamination of
the aquifer, and have led a
complaint with the province’s
Information and Privacy
Commissioner on the grounds
that the government’s
conduct violated laws
requiring disclosure of
information deemed to be in
the public interest.
While there have been no
major illnesses, let alone
fatalities, attributed to
contamination of the Steele
Springs water supply, the
situation is likely to up the
pressure on government to
provide stronger assurances
and protections for ground
water and drinking water
supplies.
Interior Health Authority
ocials had not yet decided
on a course of action as
Country Life in BC went to
press.
Professional
Services
www.agri-jobs.ca | Phone: 604-823-6222 | Email: info@agri-labour pool.com
We do the work for you!
Agri-jobs.ca
Our business is helping your business GROW, since 1974.
Connecting employers with the right employee!
Contact us to nd out how we can fill your position:
Looking for HELP
on your farm?
View over 100 listings of farm properties at
www.bcfarmandranch.com
BC FARM & RANCH
REALTY CORP.
Buying or Selling
a Farm or Acreage?
GORD HOUWELING
Cell: 604/793-8660
GREG WALTON
Cell: 604/864-1610
Toll free 1-888-852-AGRI (2474)
Call BC’s First and Only
Real Estate Office commited
100% to Agriculture!
Helping industry build & implement
practical & sustainable programs & publications
To see past projects and potential scope of services
visit www.qfirst.ca
Ph: 604-309-3509
E: qfirst@telus.net
For more information
or to pursue an idea
contact:
Annette Moore
B.Sc.(Agr), M.Sc., P.Ag.
Quality First in
Agriculture Inc.
Jack Reams P.Ag. Agri-Consulting
v BC Farm Business Advisory Services Consultant
v Farm Debt Mediation Consultant
v Organic Consultant & Inspector
v Meat Labeling Consultant
Phone: 604-858-1715 Cell: 604-302-4033
Fax: 604-858-9815 email: marlene.reams
@
gmail.com
CONFIDENTIALITY GUARANTEED
Dustin
Stadnyk
CPA, CA
Chris
Henderson
CPA, CA
Nathalie
Merrill
CPA, CMA
TOLL FREE 1-888-818-FARM | www.farmtax.ca
Expert farm taxation advice:
• Purchase and sale of farms
• Transfer of farms to children
• Government subsidy programs
• Preparation of farm tax returns
• Use of $1,000,000 Capital Gains Exemptions
Approved consultants for Government funding through
BC Farm Business Advisory Services Program
ARMSTRONG 250-546-8665 | LUMBY 250-547-2118 | ENDERBY 250-838-7337
The researchers have yet to issue their report
but it aims to provide “an understanding of
potential long‑term environmental impacts
associated with alkaline stabilized biosolids” ...
Country Life in BC • March 201622
Over the past few years, there seems to have been
an uptick in the population of rats in the Fraser
Valley. Having never seen rats in the Columbia Valley
area south
of Cultus
Lake,
Chilliwack,
where we
have lived
for over 20
years, the
rodents appeared some two or three years ago and
became enough of a nuisance in our barn that bait
trapping became the only eective deterrent.
Apparently, we’re not alone. Neighbours have had
to deal with them and the local feed supply store is
constantly running out of traps and bait as
commercial dairy and chicken farmers also try to
control rat numbers. Clearly, hot summers and
warmer than normal winters are allowing the rodents
to survive and thrive. And they breed like, well, rats.
But how bad is the rat problem?
“I get this question all the time,” says Chelsea
Himsworth, leader, Veterinary Science and
Diagnostics, Animal Health Centre, BC Ministry of
Agriculture. “We have no idea how widespread they
are. All evidence is based on anecdotes; what people
report to others. We don’t have any sort of municipal
or regional tracking program.
“Not only are we not going out to trap them, we
aren’t recording data. We will have to start to do this.
Without it, we can’t gauge whether we have a
problem and whether it is increasing (or) decreasing.
If you don’t have the data, you don’t know if you are
Rat explosion should be a concern for farmers
Fraser Valley poultry producers at risk as wild rodents could threaten flock health
Research
MARGARET EVANS
Blue Means Power
www.LEMKEN.ca
The new ZIRKON 12 power harrow from LEMKEN gives
farmers a superior alternative to cultivators. Even when
the tractors not moving, the PTO-driven ZIRKON 12
continuously works the soil with power-driven tines
that can transform a rutted, uneven field into a perfectly
prepared seedbed in one pass. Like all LEMKEN products,
the German-engineered ZIRKON 12 provides lasting
durability and precision-crafted
components that
provide smooth and virtually silent operation.
The ZIRKON 12 offers:
Q
A variety of options and configurations to fit your tillage needs
Q
12 different models including a working width of 4.5m
Q
Hydraulic depth adjustment from the tractor cab
Q
Fast, easy change of rotational direction
Q
Optional quick-change tines
Q
Adjustable rotation speed from 330 to 440 rpm
Q
Optional LEMKEN seed drill attachment for one-pass tillage
and seeding
(604) 864-2273
www.caliberequipment.ca
(250) 938-0076
Rats are like
a sponge for
E.coli – they
don’t suer
ill eects
but they are
carriers and
that should
be cause for
concern
among
farmers.
(File photo)
having any eect with intervention.”
Rats, of course, have been an unwelcome
companion of the human race for hundreds of years.
They’re smart. They’re adaptable. They take
advantage of creature comforts. A barn with warmth,
shelter, grain and pellet droppings and plenty of
water is reason enough to move in.
But they post health dangers. In a recent
University of British Columbia study, it was found
that rats absorb pathogens from their local
environment, then spread them.
The researchers studied the feces of rats caught at
an Abbotsford poultry farm and found they all
carried avian pathogenic E. coli, a bacteria capable of
causing disease in chickens and, potentially, humans.
And more than one quarter of the rats were carrying
multi-drug resistant strains of the bacteria.
Himsworth, who is leader of the Vancouver Rat
Please see “HEALTH” page 23
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 23
HEALTH RISKS UNDERESTIMATED From page 22
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD Chicken growers can expect to
grow a lot more chicken this summer.
BC’s production for period A-136 (March 20-May
14) is at 110.58% of their quota and BC Chicken
Marketing Board (BCCMB) general manager Bill
Vanderspek expects those high numbers to
continue.
“We expect to be at 5% over base for (the summer
production periods),” he told the BC Chicken
Growers Association meeting in Abbotsford, January
25.
Unfortunately, growers will be producing that
chicken for a lower price. The live price for period A-
135 (January 24-March 19) dropped by almost three
cents per kg for mainstream chicken and 11 cents
per kg for organic chicken.
The BC price is set by a Farm Industry Review
Board-mandated formula based on the Ontario price.
Since Ontario changed its pricing formula to include
an allowance for eciencies of scale which its
supervisory board believes growers realize when
their production increases, the BC live price has
dropped almost ve cents per kg.
That is “not sustainable for BC in the long run,”
insists BCCGA president Ravi Bathe. While the BCCGA
is trying to get FIRB to agree on a change, he
admitted “it’s a long process.”
BCCMB manager of strategic initiatives and
analysis Cheryl Davie attributes the increased
demand for BC chicken to an improving economy, a
lower Canadian dollar, border closures during the
avian inuenza outbreak in the US and a successful
Chicken growers can raise more birds for less money
Oranya Farms withdraws its FIRB appeal; membership flocks to first afternoon meeting
Project, is lead author of the
research paper ‘Avian pathogenic
and antibiotic resistant E. coli in
wild rats’ which will appear in the
Journal of Wildlife Diseases last
April.
One sobering fact of the
research is that the level of health
threats that rats pose has been
underestimated.
“Animals are reservoirs for
diseases like E. coli,” says Himsworth.
“Rats carry E. coli. Some E. coli have
particular genetic elements that
allow them to cause disease or be
resistant to antibiotics, and they are
harmful to agricultural animals such
as chickens.”
She says the pathogen does
not originate in the rats. The
rodents enter an environment and
absorb the E. coli and are then a
source of infection in the future.
“At rst glance, it seems to be a
lower risk as the rats are coming
into an environment clean, if you
will,” she says. “But it’s actually a
higher risk as they have this
sponge capacity and it massively
increases the number of potential
organisms they can carry.”
As much as rats act as a
pathogenic sponge soaking up
bacteria from the environment,
they don’t actually get sick from
the organisms.
“Because of something we
don’t understand yet, the rats can
carry the organisms but do not
get sick. They are carriers. Rats
that look the healthiest are the
most likely to carry organisms that
can cause disease in other animals
and so, just by looking at them,
you can’t tell if they are carrying
something dangerous.”
That makes ock protection
especially dicult for poultry
farmers. Once a ock has gone to
market, the barn is thoroughly
cleaned before the next ock
comes in. But if the rat infestation
continues, then no amount of
cleaning will get rid of the
potential for infection for the
subsequent birds – which is why
rat infestations must be taken
seriously.
“On a personal level, deal with
the rat infestation, hire a pest
control professional and nd out
how to get rid of them, prevent
them, get on top of them,” says
Himsworth. “I argue for a co-
ordinated approach, too, as to
where they are a threat. Producer
groups could track infestations
and nd out what factors are
working, not working and what
the best practices are.”
The rat problem must be
tackled with an educated,
scientic approach that also
involves programs and controls at
the municipal level.
retail campaign.
“The amount of chicken sold in BC depends on
the relative price in Washington and border
closures,” she told growers,
noting BC sales were up
more than 140,000 kg per
month when the border was
closed for chicken.
“That’s equivalent to 200
birds per farm per cycle,”
Davie said.
She also credited the
Chicken Squad campaign
which had growers telling
their story to consumers in
12 supermarkets last
summer.
While that increased
consumer trust, she admits
the increase was short-lived.
“We saw a decline in trust in December due to AI.
Consumers worry about it,” Davie said. “We still have
a lot of work to do.”
The association is hoping its two Poultry in Motion
demonstration trailers will do some of that work for
them. It has hired a co-ordinator and dropped all
fees to make the trailers available at more schools
and events.
“We hope to reach 75 schools in the Fraser Valley
and Vancouver Island and 25-30 in the Interior,”
association directors stated.
The board also announced Oranya Farms has
withdrawn its FIRB appeal after the board amended
its organic chicken policy to give growers more time
to obtain mainstream quota for their organic
production.
Some organic producers had been using specialty
quota to produce organic chicken but the board
recently said specialty quota could only be used to
grow Silkies and Taiwanese chicken. Growers now
have until 2020 to obtain sucient mainstream
quota (on a sliding scale) for their production.
For the rst time, the BCCGA meeting was held in
the afternoon in hopes of attracting a larger grower
turnout. The strategy clearly worked as the room was
lled to near capacity.
Ravi Bathe
EVERY PURCHASE COMES WITH A
FREE PTO PUMP
1-888-675-7999
www.watertecna.com
MODEL 9300
TURBINE DRIVE
SPRINKLER | INLET HOSE
DIGITAL TACH
$24,800
MODEL 100/400
TURBINE DRIVE
SPRINKLER | INLET HOSE
DIGITAL TACH
$29,400
MODEL 110/400
TURBINE DRIVE
SPRINKLER | INLET HOSE
DIGITAL TACH
$35,490
SPRING SAVINGS ON REELS
*
GET REEL THIS SUMMER!
MANUFACTURED BY
Model 225 has oil bath,
back-to-back tapered roller
bearings mounted in heavy
ductile cast housing, c/w
floating duo-cone seal. Bear-
ings operate in a 90W gear
oil for constant lubrication
5/16” x 26” notched disc
blades front and rear - 10-
1/2” spacing
2-1/8” heat treated alloy
steel gang shafts
9.5L x 15”, 6 ply implement
tires on 6 bolt hubs
5” x 8” hydraulic cylinder
group, hoses, tips & depth
segments
WIDTHS: 8’, 10’, 12’, 14’, 16’
MODEL 225
SINGLE AND DOUBLEWIDE
OFFSET DISC
KELLOUGH’S
www.kelloughs.com
#3, 7491-49 Ave., Red Deer, AB. T4P 1N1
Phone (403) 347-2646 1-888-500-2646
NOTHING
SELLS LIKE
SUCCESS
IF STRONGER IS BETTER,
THEN KELLO-BILT IS THE BEST
FEATURE
OF THE
MONTH
TRACTORS! TRACTORS! TRACTORS!TRACTORS! TRACTORS! TRACTORS!
HAY AND FORAGE!
ROUND BALERS!ROUND BALERS!
$10,500
JD 935 MOCO, 11FT 6 INCH, 1000 RPM, CONDITIONER ROLL
#324134U2
$17,900
JD 630 MOCO, 9FT, 9 INCH, ROLL CONDITIONER #677392U1
$52,500
JD 6420 CAB, MFWD, 24 SP POWERQUAD TRANS, AIR SEAT
#416134U2
$104,900
JD 6125M, MFWD, 24 SPD POWERQUAD TRANS, 125HP, JD H340
LOADER, #09981401
$24,000
JD 5420N, CAB, MFWD, 12/12 TRANSMISSION, 2 SCV, 65 PTO HP
#614791U1
$59,900
JD 6710 SELF PROPELLED FORAGE HARVESTER, PRWA, 3M
GRASS PICKUP, #56813U1
JD 5325, CAB, MFWD, 12/12 POWER-REVERSER, 55HP, 3200 HRS
#108582U1
$32,500
MF 4270 OPEN STATION, MFWD REVERSER, LOADER, 100PTO
#604041U1
$19,900
MCCORMICK F95, CAB, MFWD, NARROW, 2 SCV #644817U1
$52,900
CASE IH MAXXUM 110, CAB, MFWD, 110HP, LH REVERSER
#676203U1
$35,000
KUBOTA M8540 NARROW, CAB, MFWD, 2332 HRS #593359U1
$39,900
FELLA SM911 (12) & SM310 (11) TRIPLE MOWERS 27FT, 3IN
#290580U2
Toll Free
1-877-553-3373
Kamloops
250.573.4412
p
s
412
Kelowna
250.765.9765
1-
NEW STORE!
CHILLIWACK
604.792.1516
a
76
5
Langley
604.530.4644
$89,900
$96,500
7DQGHP
([FHOOHQW&RQGLWLRQ
/RDGHGZLWKRSWLRQV
#623043U2
$31,000
JD 5101EN, NARROW, CAB, MFWD, POWER-REVERSER, 101HP, 3
SCV’S #641883U1
$52,000
JD 5083EN NARROW, CAB, MFWD, 12/12 POWER-REVERSER,
TRIPLE SCV’S #482888L1
$43,500
JD 5093EN, NARROW, CAB, MFWD, 12/12 POWER-REVERSER
TRIPLE SCV #641834U1
$46,500
JD 5100M, CAB, MFWD, 32F/16R POWER-REVERSER, , TRIPLE MID
AND REAR SCV, H260 LOADER #60131001
$84,900
$6,900
HESSTON 1130 HAYBINE,9FT 3IN, SICKLE MOCO #668734U1
$1,200
DEUTZ KH4S, ROTOR TEDDER, OLDER BUT GOOD CONDITION
#195398U1
$7,950
FELLA TH790 TEDDER, 25FT 6 ROTOR, MANUAL FOLD
#209181U1
$7,900
HAYBUSTER 2650 BALE PROCESSOR #163779U1
$8,500
NH 658 RD BALER, 4 FT, TWINE ONLY #022207U1
$14,500
JD 567, MEGA WIDE PU, HIGH MOISTURE KIT, PUSH BAR, 540 PTO
#619216U1
$11,900
CN RBX 453, 2007, 4X5 BALES, JUST SERVICED #674443U1
+30):'
(+\GUR7UDQVPLVVLRQ
9HU\ORZKRXUV/RDGHU
5HPDLQLQJIDFWRU\:DUUDQW\
WRFKRRVHIURP
$114,900
JD 6125R, CAB, MFWD, 16 SPD POWERQUAD PLUS TRANSMISSION,
H360 LOADER ONLY 862 HOURS #09917001
$28,900
JD 5520N, O/S, MFWD/ LOADER, 3700 HRS, 16.9-24 TIRES #638421U3
$39,900
JD 5520, CAB, MFWD, 12/12 POWER-REVERSER, JD SELF LEVELING
LOADER #443731U2
$62,900
JD 6115D, CAB, 2WD, AIR SEAT, INSTRUCTIONAL SEAT, TRIPLE SVC,
POWERGARD WARRANTY UNTIL OCT 2020 #58533301
Watch for our new location
opening in Prince George
Spring 2016!
/RZSURILOH
372
VSHHG3RZHU4XDG
+IXQFWLRQORDGHU
:DUUDQW\XQWLO-DQ
#55833601
JOHN DEERE 6105M NH BIG BALER 340
P
P
$46,900
JOHN DEERE 4066R
JOHN DEERE 7230R
&DE7UDFWRU0):'

'XDOV
+RXUV
#658207U1
#61447101
JOHN DEERE 6130D
DEUTZ AGROTRON K110
)RRW)ROGLQJ3XOYHULVHU
1RWFKHG:KHHO
6FUDSHUV
([FHOOHQW&RQGLWLRQ
#266016U1
#658613U1
BRILLION PACKER JOHN DEERE 6710
+L/RZ7UDQVPLVVLRQ
7ULSOH6&9,QVWUXFWLRQDOVHDW
:KHHO:HLJKWV+/RDGHU
:DUUDQW\XQWLO2FW
6HOI3URSHOOHG+DUYHVWHU
+335:$
381HZ.QLYHV
5HFHQW6HUYLFH
$69,900
2FW
2FW

$99,500
LWLRQ
LWLRQ
$16,500
$59,900
$196,900
0):'.,97
JSP+\GSXPS
6&9·V
57LUHV
:DUUDQW\WR2FW
#674052U1
Country Life in BC • March 201624
Items may not be exactly as shown, accessories & attachments cost extra. Taxes, set-up, delivery, freight, and preparation charges not included. Prices are based on the US exchange are subject to change. A documentation fee of up to $250 will be applied on all finance offerings. Additional fees may apply. Programs and prices subject to change without notice, at any time, see dealer for full details on Green Fever offers, Some restrictions apply. *Offer valid from February 1, 201 6 until March 30, 2016 . Financing on approved John Deere Financial credit only. 0% APR purchase financing for 60 months on new
John Deere 1 Series Sub-Compact Utility Tractors. Representative Amount Financed: $10,000, at 0% APR, monthly payment is $166.67 for 60 months, total obligation is $10,000, cost of borrowing is $0. Monthly payments/cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed/down payment. MSRP cash price based on highest priced product in series: $14,696 (includes $50 documentation fee). Cost of borrowing based on Representative Amount Financed not MSRP cash price. Minimum finance amount may be required; representative amount does not guarantee offer applies. Charge for amounts past due is
24% per annum. Maximum Cash Discount Offer cannot be combined with advertised financing. * Attachments and implements sold separately. Some conditions may apply. See your participating dealer for details. Offer subject to availability and may be discontinued or modified. Taxes, set-up, delivery, freight and preparation charges not included. 0% APR purchase financing for 4 years on new John Deere Select Hay Tools. Down payment may be required. Representative Amount Financed: $50,000, at 0% APR, semi-annual payment is $6,250 for 4 years, total obligation is $50,000, cost of borrowing is $0.
Semi-annual payments/ cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed/ down payment. MSRP cash price based on highest priced product in series: $75,087 (includes $50 documentation fee). Cost of borrowing based on Representative Amount Financed not MSRP cash price. Offer valid from February 1, 2016 to February 29, 2016. Minimum finance amount may be required; representative amount does not guarantee offer applies. The charge for amounts past due is 24% per annum. Financing on approved John Deere Financial credit only. See dealer for details. Limited time offer which may not be
combined with other offers. Discounts or other incentives may be available for cash purchases. By selecting the purchase financing offer, consumers may be foregoing such discounts and incentives which may result in a higher effective interest rate.
SALE
$19,398
$296/month
Retail $23,344
/
1025R
-
-
Ask us about the New
John Deere 6- Year
Power Train Warranty
On 1-4 Series Tractors
24.2HP Hydrostatic Transmission / 4WD / Powerful Tier 4-compliant diesel engine
/ New, easy-lift hood with dual gas-charged lift struts / Equipped with John Deere H120
Quick Release Loader / Folding ROPS / Cruise Control / 0% Financing for 60 Months
Born to work within your budget
/ 6 models from 45 to 100HP
/ 2wd or 4wd, Open Station or Cab
/ 3 Transmission options / John
Deere Loaders, a perfect match
5E SERIES
3 Transmission options / John
Deere Loaders, a perfect match
0% FOR 60 MTHS
or Deduct $4200
Off Cash Price
be exactly as shown, accessories & attachments cost extra. Taxes, set-up, delivery, freight, and preparation charges not included. Prices are based on the US exchange are subject to change. A documentation fee of up to $250 will be applied on all finance offerings. Additional fees may apply. Programs and
Series Sub-Compact Utility Tractors. Representative Amount Financed: $10,000, at 0% APR, monthly payment is $166.67 for 60 months, total obligation is $10,000, cost of borrowing is $0. Monthly payments/cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed/down payment. MSRP cash price based on
m. Maximum Cash Discount Offer cannot be combined with advertised financing. * Attachments and implements sold separately. Some conditions may apply. See your participating dealer for details. Offer subject to availability and may be discontinued or modified. Taxes, set-up, delivery, freight and preparat
payments/ cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed/ down payment. MSRP cash price based on highest priced product in series: $75,087 (includes $50 documentation fee). Cost of borrowing based on Representative Amount Financed not MSRP cash price. Offer valid from February 1, 2016
h other offers. Discounts or other incentives may be available for cash purchases. By selecting the purchase financ
ing offer, consumers may be foregoing such discounts and incentives which may result in a higher effective interest rate.
GET A COUPON FOR $500 OFF THE PURCHASE
OF ANY NEW 1-6 SERIES TRACTOR!
Chilliwack & Langley Locations
FEB 29TH TO MAR 6, 2016
Kelowna & Kamloops Locations
APR 4 TO 10, 2016
Enter to win a John Deere 2025R Compact Tractor
with H130 Loader and 62D Mid-Mower Deck
.DPORRSV.HORZQD&KLOOLZDFN/DQJOH\
Bring the family down for a BBQ in Support of 4H and some
fun activities! There will be food, prizes, PLUS a bouncy castle,
Face painting and a photobooth on site.
OUR CHILLIWACK GRAND OPENING IS
MARCH 5TH AND YOU’RE INVITED!
BBQ & Activites go 11am-3pm!
44158 Progress Way Chilliwack
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 25
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
Biogas has
the potential to produce 3%
of Canada’s natural gas
supply, Canadian Biogas
Association (CBA) executive
director Jennifer Green told
the 2016 Agricultural and
Municipal Biogas Forum in
Abbotsford, January 28. She
notes agriculture alone could
produce up to 1.6 million
cubic metres of gas per year.
The CBA detailed the
benets of biogas production
in the Canadian Biogas Study
it released in 2013. The study
is intended to help provinces
develop biogas production
policies. The CBA has also
developed farm-to-fuel guides
to help individual producers
decide whether to add biogas
production to their farm.
Only two BC farms have
done that to date. The
province’s rst agriculture-
based anaerobic digester (AD)
Country Life in BC • March 201626
Biogas spinoffs could be beneficial to ag, environment
began operation on
Sumas Prairie about
ve years ago. Last
year, Seabreeze Farms
in Delta red up BC’s
second digester, using
manure from its 350
milking cow herd and
cooking fats and oils.
The AD “is only one
piece of the equation,”
says Chris Bush, who
built the Sumas Prairie
AD.
Bush is now
operations manager of
Abbotsford’s Trident
Processes which has
developed a nutrient recovery
system for the AD’s digestate
(waste). The system removes
the bre and nutrients from
the digestate and treats the
remaining wastewater.
Fibre is conditioned for
reuse as bedding in the barns,
leaving only 4% solids in the
remaining wastewater. A
second press removes most of
the water, creating a “sludge”
with double the solids
content and 85-90% of the
phosphate, 54% of the
nitrogen and 17% of the
potassium. Polymers are used
to concentrate the sludge,
complete with its nutrients,
into a “cake” which contains
25% solids.
The cake can then be
pelletized and sold o-farm as
a nutrient-rich fertilizer, a
critical option as the number
of animals on today’s large
dairy farms often produce
more nutrients than the farm
can use.
The remaining wastewater,
which Langley environmental
farm plan advisor and
consultant Dave Melnychuk
calls a “digestate tea,”
contains very few nutrients.
Tests show the Seabreeze
dairy slurry generally contains
0.25% nitrogen, 0.05%
phosphorus and 0.21%
potassium. After the
wastewater goes through the
Trident process, the resulting
tea contains only 0.16%
nitrogen, less than 0.01%
phosphorus and 0.12%
potassium. In contrast, the
bedding contains 0.40%
nitrogen, 0.13% phosphorus
and 0.11% potassium while
the cake contains 0.68%
nitrogen, 0.22% phosphorus
and 0.12% potassium.
Melnychuk has begun a
three-year trial to nd
out how corn and
grass respond to
application of the tea
and determine the
best application rates.
He believes the tea
oers tremendous
potential for farmers as
it still includes some
nitrogen but almost
no phosphorus.
“Farmers may not
have enough nitrogen
but too much
phosphorus in their elds,” he
points out.
After applying the tea to
corn at low, medium and high
rates, Melnychuk said even
the low application rate
produced a wet yield of 29
tonnes per hectare, higher
than the 25-28 tonne average
in BC elds.
“We are very pleased with
the initial results,” he said,
noting there was less
phosphorus in both the corn
and grass elds at the end of
the season than at the
beginning.
“If we can validate that for
the next two years, it provides
an option for phosphate rich
soils,” he says.
The Trident process is one
way of removing excess
phosphorus from dairy slurry.
University of BC civil
engineering professor Victor
Lo has spent the past few
years researching the use of a
microwave-enhanced
advanced oxidation process
to reduce the solids in the
manure and crystallize struvite
which is 95% pure
phosphorus.
“Microwave technology is
the only way to reduce solids
by 85%,” Lo says, adding once
the solids are broken down,
nutrients can be captured
more easily.
“This reduces the amount
of disposable solids and
number of nutrients which
need to be applied to the
land,” Lo says.
Unlike the Trident process,
which processes digestate
after it comes out of an AD,
Lo’s system processes the
manure and other organic
waste before it goes into an
AD.
“This reduces the
processing time in the AD,” Lo
states.
He is now building
demonstration units and
conducting feasibility studies
at both the UBC Dairy
Education & Research Centre
in Agassiz and the James
Wastewater Treatment
Program in Abbotsford.
He admits the system has
high capital and operating
costs and may therefore not
be a money maker for farmers
but may help solve some of
the environmental issues
farmers and waste treatment
plants are facing.
Dave MelnychukJennifer Green
www.tjequipmentllc.com
360-815-1597
LYNDEN, WA
ALL PRICES IN US FUNDS
2003 JD 8120 MFWD, 208 HP, 7755
HRS, PWRSHIFT, 4 REMOTES,
540/1000 PTO. $78,000
NEW POTTINGER HIT 10.11 TEDDER,
10 BASKET, 35'8" WORKING WIDTH
$22,000
2010 JD 8270R MFWD, 270 HP,
POWERSHIFT, 4 REMOTES $79,000
1988 DEUTZ ALLIS 6250
W/455R LOADER, 54 HP, 4WD, 6140
HOURS $10,300
SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION OF BC
For more info, contact secretary Reanne Sanford
250.249.5332 reanne@krssimmentals.ca
SIMMENTALS DELIVER
MORE POUNDS PER DAY
MORE POUNDS = MORE MONEY IN YOUR POCKET!
Want more MONEY
CHOOSE
SIMMENTAL BULLS
THIS SPRING!
Want more MONEY
for your BEEF?
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 27
Diverse Canadian population drives crop diversity
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD –
Greenhouses seeking to
diversify beyond tomatoes,
peppers and cucumbers may
want to consider eggplant as
Canada’s population – and
palate – becomes more
cosmopolitan.
While traditional aubergines
are falling behind in the
grocery aisle, the inux of
immigrants in recent decades
is focusing attention on how
to secure reliable supplies of
varieties common in Asia, such
as Chinese long and Indian
round eggplant.
South Asia and China
account for the two largest
visible minority groups in
Canada as a whole, at 4.8%
and 4% of the population,
respectively. Southeast Asia
accounts for 0.9% of the
population.
Of course, the
concentration in some parts of
the country is higher; in
Vancouver, Southeast and East
Asian peoples represent 29.7%
of the population while South
Asian ethnicities account for
11.1%.
These minorities are major
consumers of eggplant,
helping drive sales of non-
Italian varieties from 18 million
kilograms in 2011 to 25 million
kilograms in 2014 – a 32%
increase.
South Asians are the largest
consumers, accounting for two
kilograms per capita each year.
Chinese diners consume 1.4
kilograms each, split equally
between Chinese long and
Indian round varieties.
Canadians, by contrast,
consume just 250 grams total.
Dr. Viliam Zvalo, a research
scientist studying vegetable
production systems at the
Vineland Innovation and
Research Centre in Vineland,
Ontario, said growers would
be wise to pay attention to the
trend.
“By 2030, this market could
be worth 50 million kilograms,”
he told growers at the Pacic
Agriculture Show in
Abbotsford this past January.
“There’s two million new
Canadians by 2020 ... and most
of the immigrants coming to
Canada, those two million, are
coming from South and
Southeast Asia.”
Shifting culinary practices
accompany these changing
demographics. By some
estimates, non-Italian varieties
account for 25% of the
eggplant market, and
represent its fastest growing
segment at that.
“The Chinese long eggplant
can be cooked directly and
that ts the modern lifestyle,”
Zvalo said. “So consumers,
once they’ve tried the Chinese
long eggplant, they will stick
to it. They will not go back to
the traditional eggplant unless
they are making eggplant
parmigiana.”
Not up to snuff
Unfortunately, much of the
Chinese and Indian eggplant
currently available in Canada
isn’t up to snu.
Approximately 85% of the
world’s eggplant is produced
in elds across Asia but it’s
highly perishable. Canada’s
supply typically comes from
the Caribbean but by the time
it reaches stores (not to
mention consumers), it’s
starting to deteriorate
“Oftentimes, the quality is
quite compromised,” Zvalo
said. “So there’s quite a bit of
interest from the consumers
and also from the retailers to
have a locally produced
Chinese long and Indian round
eggplant.”
The size, shape and colour,
are all important
characteristics in getting
consumers to buy in.
Chinese long eggplant
should have a bright purple
colour and dark green calyx.
It’s typically upwards of a foot
long and three to ve
centimetres in diameter.
Indian eggplant is dark
purple, almost black, and is
typically ve to seven
centimetres long and three to
ve centimetres wide. Unlike
long eggplant, it must be rm.
Variety screening trials
taking place in the new state-
of-the art-greenhouse at
Vineland will help identify
which varieties might work
well in Canadian greenhouses.
The research is receiving input
from retailers who regularly
visit the facility to view and
taste the various varieties.
“We believe the eggplant is
an opportunity,” Zvalo said,
but noted that feedback from
retailers is critical. “There’s
really no point for us to be
growing crops if there’s no
market for it.”
Eight varieties tested
During 2015, eight varieties
of Chinese long and two
varieties of Indian round
eggplant were tested; half
Dr Villiam Zvalo from Vineland Research and Innovation Centre in Ontario displays a box of Chinese
long (left and right) and Indian round eggplant varieties he feels has market potential for Canadian
greenhouse growers. (File photo courtesy of VRC)
See “EGGPLANT” page 28
MAXIMUM RESIDUE INCORPORATION
INVEST IN QUALITY
®
Matsqui
Ag-Repair
Abbotsford, BC
604-826-3281
Noble
Tractor & Equipment
Armstrong, BC
250-546-3141
Noble
Tractor & Equipment
Kamloops, BC
250-851-3101
Huber
Farm Equipment
Prince George, BC
250-560-5431
EL POWER TILLERS SECONDARY TILLAGE
r*GCX[FWV[EJCKPQTCNNIGCTFTKXGHQTOCZKOWOTGNKCDKNKV[
r/WNVKRNGTQVQTQRVKQPUHQTEQWPVNGUUQRGTCVKQPU
r8CTKQWUFGRVJEQPVTQNQRVKQPUHQTFKHHGTGPVUQKNUCPFCRRNKECVKQPU
sYQTMKPIYKFVJU
KuhnNorthAmerica.com
Country Life in BC • March 201628
Annual price tag of invasive species for Canadian ag: $50 million
EGGPLANT STUDIES From page 27
by DAVID SCHMIDT
RICHMOND The Invasive
Species Council of BC (ISCBC)
was formed just over a decade
ago to attempt to put the
brakes on the spread of
invasive pests in the province.
It originally targeted only
plants but has since expanded
its mandate to include animals.
Environment and Climate
Change Canada (EECC)
national biodiversity policy
manager Kelly Torck says the
impact continues to increase
even though no new invasive
pests were established in
Canada in 2012-13. Between
2009 and 2013, ECCC
developed 47 intervention or
management plans to deal
with invasives which already
exist.
Task force established
Last year, federal and
provincial environment
ministers took the next step,
establishing an invasive
species task force to nd ways
to strengthen the policy
framework, improve
leadership, co-ordination and
collaboration among agencies
and develop strategic
partnerships. The task force
will begin consultations in
March and provide
recommendations at this fall’s
environment ministers’
meeting.
“The task force is a
recognition that invasive
species remain a challenge,”
Torck told the ISCBC annual
forum in Richmond, February
3.
Canadian Food Inspection
Agency (CFIA) invasive alien
species and domestic
programs ocer Kristina Pauk
told the forum the CFIA
currently regulates 20 invasive
plant species and may soon
add more. She notes CFIA has
updated its PIO (potentially
injurious organisms) program.
“If you want to bring
something into Canada (for
biofuel production, research,
biocontrol or other reasons),
apply for an import permit. If a
risk assessment hasn’t already
been done, it will prompt
some action,” she said.
The program seems to
control conventional
importers but is having less
success with those involved in
E-commerce.
“E-commerce is dicult to
control,” Pauk admits, saying
the CFIA is working with the
US, Australia and New Zealand
to educate Canadian importers
and exporters.
The best way to manage
invasive species, which cost
agriculture $50 million per
year, is to get rid of them
before they get too
established. That is the aim of
the Early Detection Rapid
Response program, says Becky
Brown, who was an invasive
plants specialist with the BC
Ministry of Agriculture and
now lls the same role with
the Ministry of Forests, Lands
and Natural Resource
Operations.
The EDRR program has
identied 45 candidate species
and is currently working on 16
species in 121 sites. Brown
hopes that number will
increase as a result of the EDRR
Boot Camps, now held
annually in conjunction with
the ISCBC forum.
“We need active
surveillance so we are
targeting interest groups, such
as range managers, who might
recognize alien species.”
Before beginning any
eradication program, people
need to “take a long, hard look
at each site,” cautions Lisa
Jarrett of Dow Chemical. They
should consider the site
environment, whether it is a
wildlife habitat area, in or near
water and what legislation
and/or regulations may cover
the intended action.
Assessments needed
Six months to a year after a
site has been treated, people
should return to assess what’s
changed. She referred to an
example in the southern
Interior where diuse
knotweed was eliminated only
to have silver cinquefoil,
another invasive, move in.
ISCBC executive director
Gail Wallin, who co-chairs the
Canadian Council on Invasive
Species, said public interest in
invasive species is increasing.
“I did 18 media interviews
(during the forum),” she noted.
“If people are talking about
invasives, that’s okay.”
The ISCBC passed motions
removing the distinction
between regular and alternate
directors and reducing the
total number of directors over
time. They took the rst step
by only electing three people
(Dave Holden, Nadia Chan and
Val Miller) to replace the four
(David Borth, Jamie
Richardson, Carolyn Richman
and Tom Wells) who are
departing.
were grown on their own roots
and half were grafted, with the
grafted plants performing
best. Density of the plantings
was 2.3 plants per square
metre, with two stems per
plant – below the three stems
common in commercial
production.
The variety Long Purple
showed best in the initial trials.
“[It] perfectly met the
requirements of retail for the
colour, for the green calyx, for
the shape. When grafted, there
was 85% increase in yield,”
Zvalo reported.
Yields were also good,
exceeding the threshold of 10
kilograms per square metre set
for viability.
“Right now, there’s no other
variety that we know of that
would provide similar yield
potential and quality,” Zvalo
said of Long Purple.
However, the Japanese
variety Orient Express – a dark
burgundy fruit with purple
calyx – attracted interest from
retailers as an intermediate
variety between Italian
traditional varieties and the
new oerings.
“This variety actually had a
lot of interest, and the retailers
are thinking this is the kind of
eggplant they can move the
traditional eggplant
consumers into,” he said. “It’s a
very good yielding variety.”
The coming year will see
four varieties each of Indian
round and Chinese long
eggplant grown on six
dierent rootstocks. A further
dozen varieties are under
observation for potential trial
in the future.
Indian round varieties will
receive particular attention
this year as trials last year
suggested the need for
management separate from
Chinese long varieties.
“We’ve since talked to the
major seed suppliers and got
some new varieties in the mix,
so I think we should have
some interesting data in a year
from now,” Zvalo said.
Kristina Paul
Exec Director Gail Wallin
British Columbia Angus Association
ANGUS BULLS
SEEDSTOCK SALES | EVENTS
March 5
Prime Time & Cutting Edge, 1 pm Williams Lake
March 7
Select Sale, Dawson Creek
March 12
Harvest Angus, Williams Lake
March 19
Angus Advantage, 12:30 Kamloops
March 26
Northern Alliance Bull Sale, 1 pm Vanderhoof
April 2
Best Bet, 1 pm Williams Lake
April 2
Gumbo Gulch Bull Sale, 1 pm Dawon Creek
April 9
Vanderhoof All Breeds, 12 pm
April 14/15
Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale
BC ANGUS
Tom DeWaal . President . 250.960.0022
Jill Savage . Secretary . 250.679-2813
www.bcangus.ca
LIZ TWAN PHOTO
are a better buy in BC
HELP
WANTED!
BC Angus is looking for a
new Secretary/Treasurer.
VISIT OUR WEBSITE OR
CONTACT JILL SAVAGE
FOR MORE INFORMATION.
CALL FOR AN ESTIMATE
LARRY
604.209.5523
TROY
604.209.5524
TRI-WAY
FARMS
LASER LEVELLING LTD.
IMPROVED
DRAINAGE
UNIFORM
GERMINATION
UNIFORM
IRRIGATION
FAST ,
ACCURATE
SURVEYING
INCREASE
CROP
YIELDS
We service all of
Southern BC
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 29
Stories by PETER MITHAM
INVERMERE – A landmark
conservation covenant will
see close to 11,200 acres of
grassland in the Columbia
Valley protected for future
generations.
Bob and Barb Shaunessy of
the SRL-K2 Ranch on the west
side of Windemere Lake near
Invermere registered a
covenant in January that will
protect the ranch, which has
been in operation since 1898.
The oldest working ranch
in the Columbia Valley, poor
forest management practices
resulted in its degradation by
the time the Shaunessys –
who also own the Salter
Creek Ranch – acquired it in
2003. Riparian zones on the
property were particularly
affected, with significant
silting up of the watercourses
occurring as a result of
loggers’ practices.
Shaunessy, who enjoys
shing as much as he enjoys
ranching, wanted to reverse
the damage and put
measures in place that would
enhance the ranch as a whole.
With approximately 9,500
acres still actively used as
rangeland, he constructed
fences around 1,000 acres to
ensure that cattle wouldn’t
add their own damage to that
of the loggers.
His long-term vision for the
land resulted in the
conservation covenant which
is held by the Nature
Conservancy of Canada, one
of the largest land holders in
the Southern Interior.
“We have been committed
to restoring and conserving
this land,” Shaunessy said
when the covenant was
announced on January 20.
“We are delighted that our
partnership with the Nature
Conservancy of Canada
means that this property will
remain intact over the long
term.”
The covenant was made
possible with the generous
financial support by various
agencies, including the
Columbia Basin Trust, the
Regional District of East
Kootenay as well as the
federal government’s Natural
Areas Conservation Program.
However, it’s the long-
range thinking of the
Shaunessys that allowed the
various parties to come
together for the long-term
protection of the land, which
also serves as a recreational
area for a host of non-
motorized activities.
Situated adjacent to
Windermere Lake Provincial
Park and other conservation
areas, the ranch serves as a
corridor for various large
animals such as grizzly bear,
elk and the deer. The
covenant will ensure it
continues to do so as a
unified whole, protected from
subdivision and
development.
The initiative also shows
how large tracts of land can
be conserved while
respecting current uses, a key
issue in discussions regarding
a potential national park
reserve in the South
Okanagan.
Speaking to Country Life in
BC last fall, rancher Mark
Quadevlieg of the Southern
Interior Stockmen’s
Association noted the Nature
Conservancy is one of the
biggest landholders in the
Southern Okanagan. Paired
with various provincial
conservation areas which
allow ranching to continue,
the agreements it has struck
provide a voluntary
framework that allows some
pre-existing activities to
continue as part of the
character of a site while
protecting it from further
development.
The more restrictive
provisions a national park
imposes are too heavy-
handed in the working
landscape of BC.
“It just isn’t the right
vehicle for the area,”
Quadevlieg said.
A 60-day public comment
period on plans for the South
Okanagan concluded on
October 12, 2015. According
to the province, BC Parks was
set to review the feedback
over the winter and post a
consultation report along
with final recommendations
in early 2016.
Columbia Valley ranchland
protected by covenant
Nature Conservancy has become one of
the largest land holders in BC’s southern Interior
Conservation covenants are legally binding
agreements registered on title of a property to conserve
land or features on that property.
They have been developed as a means of protecting
ecologically sensitive lands of all types, including riparian
areas.
Unlike restrictive covenants, conservation covenants
are entered into voluntarily and allow landowners to
permanently preserve natural features of their property
while still retaining ownership and use. Also unlike
restrictive covenants, conservation covenants can be
held by designated conservation organizations or land
trusts, as well as local governments.
Conservation covenants can trigger some property tax
reductions for landowners in jurisdictions that offer this
as an incentive. However, conservation covenants can
have significant initial costs for both the organization
that will be holding the covenant and landowner – for
legal and administrative assistance in setting them up.
Therefore, for a variety of reasons, both conservation
organizations and landowners are selective in
determining whether a conservation covenant is
desirable on a given property.
Source: www.gov.bc.ca
What are
conservation covenants?
Use a SHORTHORN Bull and increase marbling, carcass value,
docility and feed efciency of your feeder calves ...
and welcome to the land of OPPORTUNITY!
Contact
President: Gary Wood 604-536-2800
Secretary: Brett Lawrason 604-823-4004
www.AgSafeBC.ca
TRAINING EQUALS
PRODUCTIVITY
www.AgSafeBC.ca
TRAINING EQUALS
PRODUCTIVITY
www.AgSafeBC.ca
TRAINING EQUALS
PRODUCTIVITY
Climate Calculators on Farmwest:
• Ammonia Loss from Manure • Growing Degree Days
• Corn Heat Units • Pest Degree Days
(codling moth & other insects)
• Evapotranspiration • T-Sum
MONDAYS 11 AM START
SLAUGHTER, FEEDER & MISC LIVESTOCK
WEDNESDAYS 1 PM START DAIRY & SLAUGHTER
YOUR COMPLETE MARKETING OUTLET
ABBOTSFORD • 604/864-2381 • 604/855-7895
McCLARY
STOCKYARDS LTD.
BC’s best cow market for over 40 years!
34559 MCCLARY AVENUE . ABBOTSFORD
Check our website for Spring Feeder Sale dates
www.mcclarystockyards.ca
for Brookwyn Farms
THURSDAY, MARCH 10 . 12 PM
DAIRY DISPERSAL SALE
Country Life in BC • March 201630
Robert, Karen and Brian Dale of Dale Jerseys in Mission show o their bright, airy new barn and DeLaval robotic
milker during the BC Dairy Expo Farm Tour. (David Schmidt photo)
Robots milkers showcased during annual dairy tour
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD A decade ago, robotic milkers
were a rarity in BC. Now there are robotic milkers on
dozens upon dozens of BC dairy farms and more are
being installed every day.
Farmers had a chance to see and compare milkers
from three of the four manufacturers with robots in
BC during the 2016 BC dairy tour, January 27.
Brothers Gene and Grant Sache of West River
Farm in Rosedale chose to go with the market
leader, Lely, when building a new facility for their
130-cow milking herd. Their new 6-row sand-
bedded barn includes three Lely Astronaut robots.
After using the robots for about four months, they
are extremely pleased with their decision.
“There’s nothing I would change,” Gene says.
The Saches say the Lely’s not only “penciled out
better” than any of the alternatives, but have
resulted in steadily increasing milk production. The
herd averages three times per day milking with
some heifers, which are kept in their own group,
milking up to four times per day.
“We’ve seen a big production increase in that
group,” Gene says.
One-person operation
With their herd of registered Jerseys straining
their barn and their long-time milker retiring, Robert
and Karen Dale decided to turn their farm into a
one-person operation. That meant building a new
larger drive-through barn with two robotic milkers.
They opted for the DeLaval VMS (voluntary milking
system) from J & D Dairy Service, citing dealer loyalty
and support as chief reasons.
“We have dealt with (J & D) for years and their
service has been impeccable,” Robert says, adding
he likes the smaller robotic arm and the fact the
system washes the teats before each milking.
“Jerseys are lower to the ground so a smaller arm is
better for them.”
The new barn was designed to maximize cow
comfort. Instead of continuing to use pasture mats,
they put in gel mats. They also installed a drain
down the centre of the alley to minimize urine
buildup.
“We want to see happy cows,” Robert states. And
Please see “QUICK” page 31
Top-notch seeds!
OUR TEAM OF EXPERTS
British Columbia / Evergro
Gurnaib Gill
Fraser Valley
gurnaib.gill@cpsagu.ca
604 835-3124
Balkar Gill
Fraser Valley
balkar.gill@cpsagu.ca
604 825-0366
Terry Stevens
Vancouver Island
terry.stevens@cpsagu.ca
604 883-5361
Ben Yurkiw
Fraser Valley and BC Interior
ben.yurkiw@cpsagu.ca
604 830-9295
Ontario
Warren Peacock
wp@norseco.com
519 426-1131 | 519 426-6156
Manitoba
Gilliane Bisson
gbisson@norseco.com
514 295-7202
Maritimes
Yves Thibault, agr.
yt@norseco.com
418 660-1498 | 418 666-8947
Customer service
order@norseco.com
800 561-9693 | 800 567-4594
Martin Deslauriers
Sales Manager
Vegetable Division
mdeslauriers@norseco.com
438 989-4863
norseco.com
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 31
to ensure they get a good
look at those cows, they put
elevated walkways around the
perimeter of the barn.
Although they had only
been using the new barn and
robots for eight days prior to
the open house, initial results
are encouraging.
Herd reduced
“The first few days were
very stressful as we trained
the cows but they settled in
quickly,” the Dales say.
Somatic cell counts have
already dropped and they
expect production to
increase, allowing them to
reduce their herd from the 90
plus cows they currently milk.
The newest robotic milker
in BC is the GEA MI-one.
Pacific Dairy Centre installed
the first such unit at Bileena
Holsteins in Agassiz and Bill
Klop, and his son Alex
couldn’t be happier.
The double box unit has a
capacity of 110 cows, enough
to handle the 100 cows the
Klops were milking when
they started using it in
October 2015. Production has
increased so much they now
milk just 83 cows.
“It’s all about producing
more with less. Less cows
means less problems and less
manure,” Alex says.
Improved quality
He notes milk quality has
improved dramatically.
Somatic cell counts dropped
from 150,000 in the parlour
to just 60,000 with the robots
and the plate count is usually
under 10,000.
Doing more with less is the
key to the MI-”one” system
and indeed what gives the
system its name.
The double-box unit
means a single computer and
control unit handles both
robots and each robot does
all its milking tasks with a
single arm. Before it begins to
milk the cow, the system
shoots a gust of water and air
through the cup to clean the
teats. After each milking, the
unit disinfects itself with a
hydrogen peroxide solution.
“The only thing that hits
the cow is the teat cup,” Alex
explains.
Each teat is treated
individually. Not only does
the system remove each cup
individually when that
quarter is finished milking,
but it tests the conductivity
of the milk in each quarter
and can divert a single
quarter if necessary.
Discarded milk
“If you have an infection in
only one quarter, you don’t
have to discard all the milk,”
Alex notes.
The Klops also use the Cow
Scout heat detection system,
which results in a 70% catch
on first breeding,” and the
Bunk Time system which
registers when they are
eating.
“It’s very handy with the
fresh cows. When ketosis hits,
we can see it very quickly,”
Alex notes.
All that technology may be
overwhelming to some,
including Bill, but Alex is
convinced it has improved
herd management.
“The key is to use all the
information the system
provides,” he says.
QUICK TO SETTLE From page 30
Milking can be a relaxing exercise when you have robotic milkers to do it for you. Just ask Gene, left,
and Grant Sache of West River Farm in Rosedale. The two brothers recently moved their herd into a
new barn with three Lely robots. (David Schmidt photos)
Bill, left, and Alex Klop of Bileena Holsteins in Agassiz were proud to show o BC’s rst GEA MI-one
double box robotic milking system during the BC Dairy Expo Farm Tour.
604.556.7477
DUNCAN
5410 Trans Canada Hwy. 250.748.8171
KELOWNA
103-1889 Springfield Road
250.860.2346
NANAIMO
1-1277 Island Hwy. S
250.753.4221
PARKSVILLE
587 Alberni Hwy. 250.248.3243
SAANICH
1970 Keating Cross Rd. 250.652.9188
SALMON ARM
1771 - 10th Avenue S.W. 250.832.8424
WEST KELOWNA
2565 Main St., Hwy. 97 South 250.768.8870
ABBOTSFORD
31852 Marshall Place
Canadian Owned and Operated
100%
Sweet Smell of Spring
NEW LOCATION
Check out
www.bchereford.ca
for a Hereford breeder near you
March 26, 2016—43rd Annual
Dawson Creek All Breeds Bull Sale
April 9, 2016 — 41st Annual
Vanderhoof All Breeds Bull Sale
April 14 & 15, 2016 — 79th Annual
Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale
BCHA Secretary
Janice Tapp
250-699-6466
BCHA President
Murray Gore
604-582-3499
Country Life in BC • March 201632
Much more than a mower.
THE NEW GC1700 SERIES from Massey Ferguson. Welcome to the new standard in sub-compact
tractors. Versatile, powerful and easy to operate, these nimble workhorses handle everything from mowing,
loading and backhoeing to snow blowing and much more. The new GC1700 Series. Another way we're
helping you farm your world more productively than ever before. See us soon or visit masseyferguson.us.
0
%
APR
FINANCING
available on new products!
ABBOTSFORD Avenue Machinery Corp. | 521 Sumas Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .604/864-2665
KAMLOOPS Noble Equipment Ltd. | 580 Chilcotin Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250/851-3101
MAPLE RIDGE Van Der Wal Equipment Ltd. | 23390 River Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604/463-3681
VERNON Avenue Machinery Corp. | 7155 Meadowlark Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/545-3355
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 33
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD
In our
grandparents’ or, even in
some cases our parents’ day,
dairy cows were housed in
stanchion barns and
monitored individually. As
dairies moved into freestall
housing and parlour milking,
farmers started managing
cows in groups. To better
manage health challenges
and meet increasing
consumer demands for animal
well-being and traceability,
farmers need to go back to
monitoring cows individually,
says University of Kentucky
dairy extension specialist
Jerey Bewley.
Technology is making that
possible, he told farmers at
the BC Dairy Expo in
Abbotsford, January 28. That
comes in the form of sensors
which allow cows to “talk to
us in a dierent way. We’re
asking them to bring us data.
Sensors have the potential
to improve health and well-
being through early
detection,” Bewley said.
Technology has come a
long way in the last decade.
Lely, GEA, DeLaval and Cell
Sense all oer systems to
measure changes in somatic
cell counts and provide early
detection of mastitis. Bewley
particularly praised the
DeLaval Herd Navigator,
which is already in use on
several BC dairy farms but has
not yet made its way into the
US, calling it “amazing
technology.”
He believes the dairy
industry is “just at the
beginning” of using
technology, saying systems to
measure feeding time,
rumination time, lying time
and other factors are still in
their infancy.
Estrus detection is already
well-developed, Bewley saying
today’s heat detection
technologies (and there are
many to choose from) pick up
heats “better than humans.
When it comes to conception
rates, you can do just as well
with activity monitoring as
with synchronization.”
University of BC assistant
professor of animal
reproduction Ronaldo Cerri
agrees, sort of. Because
today’s high-producing milk
cows come into heat less and
have lower signs of heat,
farmers started using timed AI
“but it didn’t improve
conception rates.”
His research shows heat
detection software doesn’t
improve conception rates but
doesn’t make them worse
either. Cerri says using a
combination of activity
monitoring and
synchronization oers the
best results.
Six questions
Before investing in new
technology, Bewley says
farmers should ask six
questions:
Does it explain a biological
process?
Can the data be translated
into meaningful action?
Is it cost-eective? For
example, heat detection
systems have huge economic
benets while health
detection systems have less
economic benets.
Is it exible, robust and
reliable? What happens when
there is a system outage, he
asks.
Is it simple to operate and
solution-focussed?
Is the information readily
available for use? Farmers
should know what they will
do with the data once they
get it or there is no point in
getting it.
If we could talk
to the animals ...
Dairy specialist Jerey Bewley, from the University of Kentucky, advised producers at the BC Dairy
Expo in January to ask (and answer) six questions before investing in new technology for their farms.
(Photo courtesy of University of Kentucky)
CUSTOM SLAUGHTER SERVICES PROVIDED
Serving the Community Together
WANTED: ALL SIZES MARKET GOATS & LAMBS
ashiq@meadowvalleymeats.com
604/465-4752 (ext 105)
fax 604/465-4744
18315 FORD ROAD
PITT MEADOWS, BC V3Y 1Z1
PROVINCIALLY INSPECTED ABATTOIR BC#34
• BEEF
• VEAL
• BISON
• LAMB
• GOAT
• DEER
MEADOW VALLEY MEATS
Technology for monitoring cows
brings relevant data in a timely manner
He told farmers not to be
the rst to use a particular
technology as they then have
to work out all the inevitable
kinks themselves. Nor should
they be the last to use it.
“If you’re using the same
CIDC
Check-off
BCID
Fund
9
Work
Beef
at
Check-off
Check-off
CIDC
9
Ch
9
f
9
h
eck-o
f
9
a
t
9
W
9
B
ee
f
9
ork
9
Wo
Fund
CI
-
D
Fund
BCID
Producer Check-Off Supports Beef Industry Projects.
www.cattlefund.net | 1-877-688-2333
technology nine years from
now, you’re using the wrong
technology.”
Most important, farmers
should not expect systems to
be a cure-all.
“Technologies are not a
replacement for bad
management,” Bewley
stressed.
Tractor safety training
for all farmers in BC, at no cost!
www.AgSafeBC.ca
AgSafe
FORMERLY FARSHA
TRAINING CO-SPONSORED BY
“Canadian Agricuural Safety Week”
March 13-19, 2016
Book today!
Call: 1.877.533.1789
Contact@AgSafeBC.ca
NEWS & INFORMATION
YOU NEED to GROW!
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
SEE PAGE 46 FOR DETAILS
The agricultural news source in
British Columbia since 1915
COUNTRY
Life
in BC
Country Life in BC • March 201634
Farm safety
is all about
reducing risk
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD – During the
annual industry dinner that
precedes the Pacic
Agriculture Show, BC
agriculture minister Norm
Letnick congratulated the
province’s farmers on
emerging from 2015 without
a single farm fatality, a rare
accomplishment in the risk-
laden world of food
production.
But within days of the
minister speaking,
WorkSafeBC reported the
sector’s rst incident of 2016
when an orchard worker
tumbled from the seventh
step of a nine-foot ladder
while pruning pears and
fractured several ribs.
While livestock operations
remained the riskiest ventures
to be in, the injuries sustained
by the seasonal agricultural
workers underscores the risks
that workers across the
industry face every day as a
matter of course.
Risks remain the same
While farming has become
a popular career choice for
many young people, the risks
that come with the eld
remain the same. Although
technology has made many
jobs safer, the enduring
dangers of slips, falls and
asphyxiation from the release
of gases are ever present. (In
December 2015, WorkSafeBC
recorded a “close call” when
an ammonia release occurred
in the compressor room of a
poultry facility; fortunately, a
safe evacuation followed and
no one was injured.)
But if the dangers are old-
school, young farmers coming
into the sector are more
attuned to the risks and
conscious of aligning their
work environments with their
own priorities.
This was abundantly clear
at the Pacic Agriculture
Show where several speakers
spoke to the need for
production arrangements that
Please see “ROUTINES” page 35
> wrap bales of hay/straw or haylage/sileage
>High speed vertical wrapping ring
>15 knife chopper unit
>3 belt bale chamber with endless belts
Safety rst. The
crew from BC
Livestock – (left to
right) Donny
Heighes, Kenny
Allison, farm-owner
Allan Smith, Kyle
Baron and Tyson
Silverson – installed
a brand new Hi-Hog
squeeze and chute
set-up funded in
part by CASA’s Back
to Ag program that
will allow Smith and
his daughter,
Devon, to manage
their Angus herd.
(Cathy Glover
photo)
www.AgSafeBC.ca
WORKER SAFETY
SHOULD BE YOUR
TOP PRIORITY
are ergonomically correct, not
just because it’s healthier but
because it reects how
workers themselves want to
be treated.
Just as many orchardists
are devising production
systems that avoid the need
for ladders, producers such as
Chris Thoreau made comfort a
priority when he devised a
system for producing
microgreens at his small-scale
urban farm in Vancouver’s
Strathcona neighbourhood.
Sure, he took some
chances early on; in one
notable example, he used a
machete to harvest greens
because it delivered an even
cut. However, a close call
made him realize the blade
that worked so eciently on
his crop could cut both ways
and raise some
uncomfortable questions if
WorkSafeBC ever had to
investigate an incident.
The machete was sheathed
but the production system
remained within reach of
workers.
“Having a comfortable
working environment was
really important,” he said of
the system of benches
devised in 2008 for what’s
now known as the Vancouver
Food Pedalers Co-operative.
While the criteria might
seem unorthodox to large-
scale operators, Thoreau
envisioned a farm that would
be fairly compact and allow
him to maintain relatively
normal working hours. He
also wanted to avoid physical
hardship.
The vision led to a
production system that saw
greens sprouted and
harvested on waist-high
benches. Canopies sheltered
the growing greens, as well as
workers, from the elements.
While the system isn’t
without its risks, the working
environment reduces
bending and is easier on the
bodies of those tending the
plants. A subsequent
expansion to a used shipping
container saw similar
principles guide development
of the new production space.
Second nature
Similarly, but on a much
larger scale, Lydia Ryall of
Cropthorne Farm in Delta –
who was named BC
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 35
ROUTINES From page 34
Outstanding Young Farmer in
2014 – told growers at the
Pacic Agriculture Show last
year that her 10-acre farm has
made worker comfort and
safety second nature.
Ryall’s vegetable farm has
collated its practices in a
manual based on one in use
at New York’s Roxbury Farm.
The manual not only sets
expectations for workers, it
establishes a routine that
makes handling practices a
matter of course, reducing the
potential for variation, and in
turn, risk.
Bins used for produce, for
example, are a standard size –
30 pounds – so that everyone
has a common denition of
“bin” and there’s reduced
stress on the workers.
According to Ryall, 30 pounds
is what workers seem
comfortable lifting on a
repeated basis.
Key variables
Still, livestock are likely to
remain among the key
variables when it comes to
farm safety.
Just like humans, they’re
living creatures with
personalities of their own.
This in itself is a risk factor.
However, having the right
equipment can help make it
safer to handle livestock.
A serious farm accident in
late 2014 put Devon Smith,
the daughter of Country Life in
BC’s Cathy Glover, in the
hospital for nearly two
months.
Smith slipped and fell
against a PTO shaft driving a
post hole auger, and after an
extensive and heroic recovery
has resumed handling the
family’s Angus herd. But her
experience isn’t one she
Call WaterTec Today and Get Your Free Estimate !
vern@watertecna.com kristen.weir@watertecna.com
MECHANIZED IRRIGATION
Growing More With Less Water
CENTER PIVOTS, LINEARS, CORNERS
Toll Free in Canada
1-855-398-7757
www.AgSafeBC.ca
ROPS & SEAT BELTS
SAVE LIVES!
INCREASED SPEED
AND DURABILITY
NOW THAT’S SMART.
Two new center-pivot Discbine
®
disc mower-conditioner models—13’ and 16’3”
models—use larger discs to speed through tough crop conditions and the new,
best-in-class WideDry™ 125-inch-wide conditioning system is 22% wider than
previous models for more uniform conditioning and faster drydown. The smartest
feature of all? The peace-of-mind protection you get with the exclusive three-year
MowMax
II cutterbar warranty.
MowMax™ II disc cutterbar with larger discs,
heavier gears and interconnecting shafts
Smoother transition of crop from cutterbar
to conditioner
Exclusive ShockPRO™ hubs protect
cutterbar components
Choice of chevron rubber rolls, steel rolls
or LeaningEdge™ fl ails
© 2014 CNH Industrial America LLC. All rights reserved. New Holland is a trademark registered in the United States and many other countries, owned by
or licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries or affi liates.
Machinery
Limited
ROLLINS
R
CHILLIWACK •
1.800.242.9737 |
44725 Yale Road West • 604.792.1301
LANGLEY •
1.800.665.9060 |
21869 - 56th Avenue • 604.533.0048
BC Minister of
Agriculture Norm
Letnick and Overwaitea-
Save-On Foods produce
manager Mike Olson
joined local students
and BC Agriculture in
the Classroom
representatives to
celebrate 10 years of
the BC School Fruit and
Vegetable Nutritional
Program. The program
now delivers weekly
snacks to over 1,400
schools throughout the
province.
(David Schmidt photo)
Celebrating 10 years
Canada’s Verified Beef
Production Program
Ph: 1-866-398-2848 Email: VBP@cattlemen.bc.ca
www.cattlemen.bc.ca/vbp.htm
Simple. Practical. Trusted.
Developed for producers, by producers.
Let us help you implement
market-driven standards for
on-farm food safety,
biosecurity & animal care.
wants to repeat – whether
fencing, or dealing with
livestock.
A grant through the Back
to Ag program of the
Canadian Agricultural Safety
Association (CASA) allowed
Smith and her father, Allan, to
install a cattle-handling
system from Calgary-based
Hi-Hog Farm & Ranch
Equipment Ltd.
The 53-foot system will
allow the Smiths to process
cattle safely and eciently,
with less risk of being injured.
The system includes a
squeeze, chute and tub that
limits the contact herdsmen
have with cattle, keeping
them out of harm’s way.
Less stressful
“It’s a permanent, solid
assembly so we’re not
moving panels or having
cattle trying to duck out from
us. It’s less stressful on the
cattle and on us,” says Devon.
CASA’s Back to Ag program
oers farmers grants of up to
$10,000 for adaptive
technology that allows them
to get back to the work they
love after suering a serious
injury. The grants provide
year-round protection for
farmers, underscoring the fact
that farm safety is a daily
concern.
BOLD.
POWERFUL.
NARROW.
THE NEW T4F AND T4V SERIES TRACTORS COMBINE A
BOLD NEW STYLE WITH MORE POWERFUL FEATURES IN A
STREAMLINED DESIGN THAT’S IDEAL FOR NARROW ROWS.
Introducing the new face of narrow tractors from the world’s leading supplier of narrow
tractors: New T4F and T4V Series narrow tractors. A sleek new look, enhanced ergonomics,
advanced driver safety and powerful new hydraulic options.
Powerful, responsive and efficient 4 cylinder, 207 cu. In. engines up to 93 PTO hp
Choice of open platform, standard Blue Cab™ or new Blue Cab™ 4 with cab level 4
protection (meets European Standards for filtration and pressurization EN 15695-2:2009
and EN 15695-1:2009)
Large rear hitch lift capacity up to 4,400 lbs
Country Life in BC • March 201636
VISIT YOUR BC NEW HOLLAND DEALERS TODAY:
DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT LIMITED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
KAMLOOPS 250-851-2044 | DAWSON CREEK 250-782-5281 Toll Free 1-800-553-7482
FARMCO SALES LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KELOWNA 250-765-8266
GRASSLAND EQUIPMENT LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WILLIAMS LAKE 250-392-4024 | VANDERHOOF 250-567-4446
HORNBY EQUIPMENT ACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ARMSTRONG 250-546-3033
ROLLINS MACHINERY LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHILLIWACK 604-792-1301 | LANGLEY 604-533-0048 TOLL FREE 1-800-242-9737
FARMCO SALES LTD
Your Orchard, Vineyard & Ranching specialists in the Okanagan Valley
KELOWNA 201-150 Campion Street 250.765.8266 sales@farmcosales.com
BC research is also
comparing dierent
pollination, nutritional and
irrigation regimens and
collecting data on a large
number of new and
established varieties, including
some from the Grygleski family
of Wisconsin.
“This is our rst chance to
compare their varieties with
varieties coming out of the
Rutgers breeding program,”
Patten says.
Researchers are looking at
when a particular variety
blooms as that aects the
timing of sprays and when
bees are needed.
Although growers need
bees to pollinate the
cranberries, honeybees are not
very good at it.
“Cranberries don’t produce
much nectar so they don’t
particularly like it,” says Ocean
Spray agricultural scientist Dan
Schiauer. He notes a ower
needs at least eight tetrads of
pollen to produce a cranberry
and most honeybees only
leave about seven tetrads
behind. They do much better if
they “shake” the plant but only
3% of honeybees do that. He
says the only reason
honeybees actually do the job
is because of “sheer numbers.”
Better are leafcutter (alfalfa)
bees. Although small, they
drop about 18 tetrads per visit
which Shiauer calls
“adequate.” Leafcutter bees
by DAVID SCHMIDT
RICHMOND Last year was
“a tremendous year” for the
new BC Cranberry Research
Farm, the farm’s co-director,
Todd May, told growers at the
annual Cranberry Congress in
Richmond, February 2.
Last year was the rst year
they were able to collect
harvest and post-harvest data,
but the farm has been
collecting phenology and
environmental data since the
rst plantings in 2013.
“We will use the same
methodology year after year
so you can compare data,”
research director Kim Patten
said, noting “we can try things
you can’t do on a productive
farm.”
The horticulture extension
specialist for Washington State
University-Long Beach, Patten
directs research in BC,
Washington and Oregon,
maximizing research dollars
and allowing data
comparisons from four
research sites.
His varietal comparisons
show Pilgrim, an old variety
not grown in BC, is “still very
competitive.” Among the new
varieties, his best hope is
Welker, which consistently has
the highest yield in the Pacic
Northwest. Haines, another
new variety, also shows
promise. It has performed well
in BC and Oregon but not in
Washington.
Fruit rot causes
University of Massachusetts
and WSU professor emeritus
Frank Caruso is using the
multiple research sites to
determine which fungi cause
fruit rot. In BC, that includes
black rot, blotch rot, berry
speckle, yellow rot, white rot,
bitter rot, end rot, viscid rot,
penicillium and physalospora.
Fruit rot is growers’ biggest
problem, says Rutgers
University associate professor
of caneberry pathology Peter
Oudemans.
“Fruit rot explains 63% of
the variation in yields between
elds,” he says, claiming
economic losses from fruit rot
can reach over half a million
dollars on a 130 acre eld.
In 2014 and 2015, a project
led by BC Ministry of
Agriculture plant pathologist
Siva Sabaratnam sampled 28
commercial elds to get a
handle on the extent of the
problem. Testing found
pathogens in all regions with
black rot, blotch rot and early
rot the most prevalent at
harvest. His team will spend
the next two years evaluating
fungicides and developing
eective management
options.
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 37
International research crucial to cranberry growers
are also in short supply
although some beekeepers
are starting to mass rear them.
582 tetrads per visit
He says the ideal pollinator
is the bumblebee which has a
long enough reach to get to
the bottom of the ower and
averages 58.2 tetrads per visit.
As a result, he says it will
become increasingly
important to keep
bumblebees alive.
As an added advantage,
University of the Fraser Valley
instructor Renee Prasad notes
bumblebees continue to work
during inclement weather
(and there’s a lot in BC) when
honeybees won’t. She
recommends growers create a
“bumblebee garden” to attract
and keep bumblebees near
their elds and has created a
demonstration bumblebee
garden to show growers what
she’s talking about and
determine which plants
should be in it.
“My goal is to focus on
perennial plants which require
little attention (she only gave
her garden an application of
You can’t harvest a cranberry crop like this without bees and Island grower Je Hamilton says
bumblebees are his rst choice as primary pollinators. (Tom Walker le photo)
KuhnNorthAmerica.com
INVEST IN QUALITY
®
Matsqui
Ag-Repair
Abbotsford, BC
604-826-3281
Noble
Tractor & Equipment
Armstrong, BC
250-546-3141
Noble
Tractor & Equipment
Kamloops, BC
250-851-3101
Visit your local
Kuhn Knight
Dealer today!
Purchase a select new Kuhn Knight spreader, then cut the price further
with a Spread ‘N Save coupon.
Visit your local dealer for details and to receive your coupon.
Offer ends May 31, 2016
Please see “SPRAY” page 38
Country Life in BC • March 201638
SPRAY PROTOCOLS From page 37
1.866.567.4162
Cuts From The Bottom Up.
Maximize your productivity, reduce costs, and save valuable
time with a Bale Knife from HLA Attachments.
Available in 3 sizes, the Bale Knife uses a serrated cutting
edge to easily cut through your 4, 5, and 6 foot silage and
hay bales. A proprietary system grabs the wrap and bale
netting holding it securely as the bale is sliced and drops
free keeping bale netting and wrap out of your mixers and
feeders.
It’s unique design allows for bales to be cut a mere 6”
off the ground making it ideal for use in areas with low
overhead.
Visit www.hlaattachments.com/baleknife for more
information.
www.hlaattachents.com www.horstwagons.com
• Bearings on king pins for no sway trailing
• Includes 2 shoes and 2 Universal Pads
• 2 Ratchet straps to secure load
• 4 Wheel steering
• 4 Wheel electric brakes
• 4 Wheel independent ROAD FLEX suspension
• 30 ft. wheelbase with reinforced bottom rail
• Wheel Fenders
• Running lights on fenders and rails
• Light kit (Red Lenses)
• 2-5/16 ball hitch and safety chains
• Vehicle Identification Number for Licensing
• Double Spring Balancer
• 235/85 R16 (F Range) Highway trailer tire
on 16 x 6 x 6 rim
granular fertilizer in early
spring and one watering in
early August),” Prasad said.
Initial results indicate
heather and rhododendrons
attract the most bumblebees
with the rst showing up as
early as February. While
attractive to bumblebees, she
does not recommend
blueberries and rosemary as
they are not drought-tolerant.
She also recommends the use
of grasses, rocks and logs to
provide nesting areas for the
bumblebees.
Although Prasad considers
bumblebees “insurance”
pollinators, they are the rst
choice for Courtenay
cranberry grower Je
Hamilton.
“I use bumblebees as my
primary pollinators and
honeybees as secondary
pollinators,” he said.
Because bees are so
important, growers should be
extremely careful with
neonicotinoid
sprays, which can
kill the bees.
Schiauer notes
Admire is eective
in controlling
cranberry root
worm but should
only be used after
bloom since it is a
neonicotonoid.
Growers should
also limit its use as
residues (8-11 parts
per billion) can appear for at
least three years.
25 parts per billion okay
“The Food and Drug
Administration says less than
25 parts per billion is
acceptable,” he notes, adding
“I hope this means the FDA
will continue to allow it
because it’s very important to
us.”
Obtaining maximum
residue limits (MRL) for the
chemicals growers want to use
is one of the chief
activities of the
Cranberry Institute,
says CI chair John
Wilson. He notes
they were recently
successful in again
getting an MRL for
Bravo in Europe,
meaning growers
who export to
Europe can use it.
However, Codex
(which sets base
MRL’s for the world) has
rejected the institute’s data so
if Europe follows Codex’s lead,
it could be on its way out
again.
Denitely on its way out is
Diazinon, which Canadian
growers will not be able to use
after this year.
Some products may be
used in one country but not
another. Exirel is one example.
It has an MRL in Canada but
none in the US, eectively
nixing its use on any
cranberries grown in or
exported to the US. Quinclorae
is another example. Permitted
in the US, it has no MRL in
Canada so cannot be used
here.
Since only BC allows the use
of Movento to control
cranberry tipworm, Oudemans
has been researching
alternatives, nding that two
applications of Sevin provide
good control. He is also
looking at “soft” chemistries to
control reworm. While most
don’t work well, he says
Altacore provides almost 100%
control.
Cranberry field decline
Chemicals are useful when
you know what the pest or
disease is. What if you don’t?
Oudemans, Kwantlen
Polytechnic University
professor of sustainable
agriculture and food systems
Rebecca Harbut and University
of BC professor emeritus Les
Lavkulich are working
together to determine what’s
causing cranberry eld decline
(CFD). CFD manifests itself as
“dead patches” where the
roots have disappeared.
“This is one of the most
complicated problems I’ve
seen in cranberries,”
Oudemans said. “It just seems
to appear out of nowhere.”
“Nothing has come out of
previous research eorts to
identify a cause,” Harbut
added.
They are using infrared
photography to identify hot
spots and potential hot spots
and analyzing soil core
samples from aected areas
and neighbouring unaected
areas.
Lavkulich believes
anaerobic soils starve the roots
of oxygen, causing CFD. “We
need to rethink how we
manage peat soils because
their characteristics change
over time.”
Growers examine cranberry roots during the BC Cranberry
Congress in Richmond, February 2. (David Schmidt photo)
Les Lavkulich
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 39
by LINDSAY CHUNG
DUNCAN - Barrie Redl and
his family own and operate
Redl Ranch in 150 Mile House.
They direct market Redl's
Home-Grown Beef. Their
cattle are raised without
antibiotics, pesticides,
herbicides, growth implants,
added hormones, animal by-
products or medicated feeds,
nor are the cattle fed corn or
grain. They also are part of the
Veried Beef Production (VBP)
program and during a
presentation at the Islands
Agriculture Show in February,
VBP's BC co-ordinator,
Annette Moore, used Redl
Ranch as an example of how
VBP can give producers the
condence to back up their
marketing claims.
Redl Ranch sells its beef
direct to customers and at six
locations in the Fraser Valley.
Moore says Redl Ranch has a
binder full of photos which
shows all aspects of life on
their farm, and customers
have access to all their
records. This helps them tell
the story behind their
marketing claims and shows
how they do what they say
they do.
“He says you get everything
from the Vancouver yuppie to
the grandma who’s very
concerned about antibiotics
because she’s on certain
drugs and is fearful, and he
tells her everything,” said
Moore, whose presentation
focused on marketing claims
such as “no hormones” and
“no antibiotics.”
“They may not recognize
the [VBP] logo but knowing
it’s there and that they see it,
Redl says brings a level of
condence that you can’t buy.
He’s only been on the
program a short while and
he’s noticed a big dierence
already.”
VBP is a national on-farm
food safety program
developed by the Canadian
Cattlemen’s Association. Not
all producers are antibiotic or
hormone free and the
program recognizes that. What
the program does is verify the
process farmers are practising.
Record keeping is key.
“All the VBP program is
doing is providing you the
tools to enable you to make
those claims more
condently,” she said. “It
enables you to have a
transparent program that you
own and you have the ability
to show if someone wants to
question you ... because it is
an unbiased third-party
auditor who comes and views
your practices.”
There are varying levels of
“no hormones” and “no
antibiotics” – from no, not
ever in the animal’s lifetime to
routine vaccinations. Which
level you practice depends on
who is buying your beef.
“There are varying levels,
and the key is to know who
you marketing to,” said
Moore. “Don’t take it lightly if
you’re going to be making
those claims.”
VBP is one of several
auditable programs available
(100% BC Beef, Canada
Organic and SPCA Certied
are others) and they all help
producers substantiate their
claims. The programs examine
farming practices, on-site
conditions and record
keeping. This way, they can
back up the claims that
participants are, for example,
hormone-free. Over an eight-
year period, VBP provides an
on-site review, three record
assessments and asks
producers to do self-
declarations.
“We primarily focus on on-
farm food safety, so things like
antibiotic use and application,
and pesticides,” said Moore.
“You’re certainly allowed to
use those products but we ask
that you use them according
to the label or on the advice of
a veterinarian so you have
substantiation on the claims
you’re making and that they’re
recognized and tested
through that.”
Important factors for being
able to prove the level of
hormones or antibiotics a
producer does or doesn’t use
include excellent biosecurity
levels, a solid herd health plan,
knowledge of risks, forage
management, reliance on
good-quality feed and
nutrition, water access and
quality, and maintenance of
animal health.
Through programs like VBP,
record keeping is key because
that provides a heads-up
when something needs to be
dealt with.
“You catch trends a lot
faster and the quicker you can
identify a problem, segregate
it and clean and get them
going, the less chance it will
spread through the rest of the
herd,” said Moore. “If the goal
Verification program is a good marketing tool
Record keeping, third party audits provide incentive to practice what you preach
Eligibility Requirements
• Schedule 2 Highways, Schedule 1 Highways, and Railway Corridors.
Secondary (sideroad) paved routes may also be considered.
• Must be a livestock producer.
• Fence must be part of an existing fencing system to contain livestock.
Application forms available at:
http://www.cattlemen.bc.ca/fencing.htm
Call TOLL FREE 1.866.398.2848 to have an application mailed to you.
Application Deadline
August 31, 2016 for consideration for the 2017 construction year.
NOW accepting applications for the
Provincial Livestock Fencing Program
along travel corridors
Provincial Livestock Fencing Program
VALLEY
¿
FARM
¿
DRAINAGE
31205 DEWDNEY TRUNK RD. MISSION Phone: 604/462-7213
www.valleyfarmdrainage.com Fax: 604/462-7215
Open Trenching • Trenchless • Sub-Irrigation
Laser Equipped • Irrigation Mainlines
drainage is
our specialty
The face of the Veried Beef Program in BC, Annette Moore says
the program helps producers identify (and x) problems quicker.
(Cathy Glover photo)
Market Musings
will return in April.
www.AgSafeBC.ca
#AgSafetyChamp
FARMERS HELPING FARMERS
Nominate yours today at
is no antibiotics and no
hormones, then your health
management plan becomes
paramount.
“The level of management
that is out there in the
industry now has far and away
exceeded what I saw at the
beginning of my career. Over
time, we’ve really improved
our management practices
and the application of
[antibiotics] is far less than we
used to use. But at the same
time, though, stu does go
through and things happen.”
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD – BC organic
growers have a whole new
set of ground rules this year
thanks to recent changes to
the Canadian Organic
Standards.
A series of webinars in
February briefed growers on
the changes but those
attending the Pacific
Agriculture Show in
Abbotsford at the end of
January received an overview
from Susan Smith, the
province’s organic specialist.
Key changes include
updates to the principles of
sound organic systems as
well as production systems,
and occurred following four
meetings of a 45-member
technical committee held
between December 2013 and
May 2015.
Originally adopted in
2006, the standard had
accumulated a list of 400
changes over the past
decade as well as several
answers from the committee
charged with interpreting
the standard. While the
standard must be reviewed
once every five years, the
sheer volume of work facing
regulators since 2006 had
delayed a comprehensive
review until 2013.
The recent changes mark
the first general overhaul of
the standard since 2006 and
address vague wording in
the original, bring Canada’s
standard in line with those in
the US and Europe and
provide a streamlined
standard for the
industry in
Canada that
reflects how
the industry
has evolved
and grown
over the
past decade.
Ground rules
The ground
rules for production
systems now require plastic
mulches to be
biodegradeable if growers
intend to leave them in the
ground, for example. This
means the plastic itself must
be a resin that’s produced
entirely with organic content
rather than petrochemicals.
While this makes sense, it’s
now a legal requirement.
Acceptable
materials are
listed within the
standard.
But if the
rules for
mulches have
tightened,
Smith said
growers have
been given extra
flexibility with
respect to fish
fertilizers. Previous
restrictions have been lifted
giving growers greater
leeway in soil amendments.
Similarly, better wording
clarifies the rules regarding
bio-char, a stable form of
carbon typically produced
from biomass via pyrolysis,
and the use of anaerobic
digestate.
Country Life in BC • March 201640
Canadian organic standards given an overhaul
The changes took effect
November 25, 2015 but
growers have a year to
implement them. In the case
of plastic mulches, growers
have an exemption from the
rules until January 2017,
allowing them to use any
remaining supplies of non-
compliant plastic mulch in
the 2016 growing season.
Organic labelling
Changes to the national
standards – which are set for
review in another five years –
come on the heels of the
province’s announcement
last fall regarding the
labelling of produce from
organic farms.
Certified organic products
will enjoy provincial
protection beginning in
autumn 2018, when the
province will restrict the use
of “certified organic” to those
products that have received
accreditation through a
recognized federal or
provincial organization. On
February 15, BC agriculture
minister Norm Letnick
introduced the legislation
that will allow the protection
to be put in place.
While federal regulations
govern those products
moving between provinces,
there has been nothing
governing products sold
solely within BC. The change
promises to give consumers
peace of mind when they see
produce labelled as organic
at the grocery store, local
farm markets and roadside
stands.
96 farms in transition
Approximately 564 farms
are certified organic through
the BC Certified Organic
program, managed by the
Certified Organic
Associations of BC (COABC).
An additional 96 farms are
currently in transition to
organic status.
The most recent report for
the Canadian Organic Trade
Association estimated that
organic food and beverage
sales in BC totaled $662
million in 2012 and are
growing by 11% a year. This
would put organic food and
beverage sales in BC on track
to top $1 billion in sales in
2016.
www.AgSafeBC.ca
#AgSafetyChamp
FARMERS HELPING FARMERS
Nominate yours today at
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 41
by TOM WALKER
SUMMERLAND – You can’t
judge an apple by its color,
but you can judge it by its skin
(or at least by how much light
passes through the skin).
Scientists and apple industry
personnel in the Okanagan
are working together to rene
a hand held device that
measures apple ripeness.
The DA meter is an Italian
invention that is able to tell
the level of chlorophyll in an
apple peel.
“Chlorophyll concentration
is an indicator of how ripe the
apple is inside,” says Dr. Peter
Toivonen, a research scientist
with Agriculture and Agri-
Food Canada in Summerland.
“It doesn’t matter what color
the apple is, the DA meter
only measures the
chlorophyll.”
LED lights from the meter
go into the apple and a sensor
measures how much light
reects back out – the “DA” or
Delta Absorbance. The
instrument is portable, easy to
use, reliable and, so far, an
excellent predictor of how
well an apple performs during
long-term storage.
“That’s really what the
packing house wants to
know,” says Toivonen. “Are
these apples going to hold up
to storage?” They don’t want
to nd out in February that
the apples are starting to
break down.
Apples problematic
The DA meter was
developed originally to test
the ripeness of peaches. There
has been some work done
with pears but collecting
good data for apples has been
problematic. Some
researchers gave up.
Fortunately, Toivonen did his
PhD using light based
instrumentation.
“I could get a handle on
what the issues were quite
quickly after I started,” says
Toivonen.
He has installed a shroud
that blocks out surrounding
light for a more accurate
reading, developed protocols
for testing and over the last
six years collected data to
validate the instrument’s
accuracy.
“I don’t want to say to
growers “use this” until we
know that it works every
time,” said Toivonen.
“We are using it in the eld
almost in tandem with the
research being developed,”
says Charlotte Leaming, a eld
services sta person for the
BC Tree Fruits Co-operative.
Tweaking needed
Leaming says the software
on the machine needs some
tweaking.
“Right now we can’t use
grower numbers as the
sample ID; we have to record
that somewhere else,” she
says. “If it could record the
grower number, the DA
average and the variety, that
would be helpful.”
Currently, the industry
measures the level of starch to
tell the ripeness of an apple. A
sample of apples is taken from
an orchard and brought to a
central location. They are
sliced in half and soaked in an
iodine solution. The starch in
the apple absorbs the iodine
and starchy areas turn dark
while sugars that have
converted from the starch as
the apple ripens do not
darken. After several minutes,
the coloration is compared to
a standard chart. The less
coloured the apple, the riper it
is.
Starch tests can take several
days, the apples are destroyed
Finding the perfect ripeness
12:6(59,1*7+(
)5$6(59$//(<
:H·YHEHHQSURXGO\IDPLO\RZQHGDQGRSHUDWHG
VLQFHRSHQLQJLQ$QGZLWKWZREOHQGLQJ
SODQWVZH·UHRQHRI%&·VODUJHVWGLVWULEXWRUVRI
JUDQXODUOLTXLGDQGIROLDUIHUWLOL]HUV2XUEX\LQJ
SRZHUDQGSUR[LPLW\WRWKH)UDVHU9DOOH\PDNHV
XVWKHORJLFDOFKRLFHIRUWUXFNORDGVKLSPHQWV
2.$1$*$1)(57,/,=(5/7'

in the process and it can be a
subjective measure.
“Each person sees a
dierent thing while the DA
meter gives you a number,”
says Toivonen.
Leaming says sampling the
apples on the tree was the
initial attraction.
Clearer picture
“The non-destruct really
helps. You are likely to take
more samples and have a
clearer picture of the
dierence between one end
of the block and the other,”
she says. “And it is easier to
check more often to see how
quickly the apples are
maturing.”
And the starch test is not
always accurate.
“In our studies in the last
four years with Ambrosia
specically, we are nding
that some years the starch
value may not be a good
indicator of storage quality,”
Toivonen says.
Ambrosia demands a quick
and accurate measure of
ripeness. The high value apple
has an average picking
window of ten days but some
years, that can be as short as
ve days.
“You have to be fast on
your feet and the DA meter
allows you to make decisions
faster,” said Toivonen.
“Ambrosia maturity is very
important so that they both
taste good and keep well,”
says Leaming.
“It is important to have
those superlative qualities
preserved,” echoes Toivonen.
“That’s why people are buying
those apples; they are not
commodity apples, they are
premium apples.”
Leaming says BC Tree Fruits
has purchased two meters at
$4,000, one each for the north
and south Okanagan. That’s
one of the benets of working
with the packing house,
Leaming points out.
“Field services sta go out
and measure the maturity of a
grower’s fruit and make
harvest recommendations.”
Research scientist Dr Peter Toivonen has been working with BC’s
fruit industry to ne tune a DA meter than can accurately determine
when apples are ready to be harvested. (Tom Walker photo)
Sign Up Today! Sign Up Today! Sign Up Today!
Spallumcheen Golf & Country Club
Vernon, BC
June 17, 2016June 17, 2016June 17, 2016
3rd Annual
3rd Annual
Fore
Fore
-
-
H BC Golf Classic
H BC Golf Classic
Sponsorship and registraƟon informaƟon is available at
www.bc4h.bc.ca
Contact May-BriƩ Jensen at funddevelopment@bc4h.bc.ca or 1-866-776-0373
Country Life in BC • March 201642
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD – Greenhouse strawberries
are commonplace in Asia, which has prompted
one US researcher to suggest growers could
be cashing in on o-season sales with the fruit
in North America.
“I thought that strawberry cannot be grown
in an open eld because, living in Tokyo,
strawberry is a greenhouse crop,” Dr. Chieri
Kubota, a Japanese-born professor in the
School of Plant Sciences at the University of
Arizona, told growers attending the Pacic
Agriculture Show in Abbotsford this past
January.
But in North America, greenhouses are the
exception to eld production. While some
growers use tunnels to enhance growing
conditions in the eld, hothouse production is
an opportunity to oer an alternative supply to
California, where growers have been hit hard
by labour shortages and drought.
Japanese and Dutch growers typically
harvest seven kilograms of berries per square
metre and Kubota feels the crop has potential
in North America. Growers in Mexico are
entering the business, a sign growers in the US
and Canada should get ready.
“We started this program about six years
ago, knowing that we need something else,
other than tomato, cucumber, lettuce in the
greenhouse,” Kubota said. “Strawberry is a
widely grown greenhouse crop in Asian
countries and also in European countries.”
Good timing
Greenhouse berry production focused on
maximizing the value of the end crop depends
on timing, just as with poinsettias.
The cycle begins in May with the
preparation of plant material, followed by
transplanting of young plants to the actual
production system. Harvest begins in
November, just in time for the holiday season
when local supplies are shortest and available
fruit commands the highest price. The season
ends with crop termination in April.
“You have to look at what’s available in what
timing and, depending on the varieties, the
limitations need to be considered,” Kubota
said, emphasizing the need to select varieties
that will hit the market at the right time.
Day-neutral and short-day (June-bearing)
varieties are both available for greenhouse
production but both have issues that require
attention.
Day-neutral varieties, for example, tend to
bear in a cyclical pattern, with a barren period
between crops. Short-day varieties bear well,
but require time-consuming, labour-intensive
management to keep owering and harvest on
track during the critical 90-day growth period
culminating in rst harvest. Without proper
attention, the plants will mature slowly and
growers will miss the majority of the holiday
season.
Kubota recommends growing new plants
from misted runners. Grown in greenhouses,
they’re free from outside contaminants and
accustomed to the greenhouse environment.
The young plants are transplanted to raised
Berries offer diversification opportunity
Strawberries grown in greenhouses are commonplace in Japan and Europe and a Japanese-born
professor in Arizona says North American growers should take a serious look at the market
opportunities strawberries under glass can bring. (File photo)
Albion leads the pack
Strawberries grown for the US market
should achieve a Brix level of seven
degrees or more. To date, few varieties
have delivered this in greenhouse trials,
together with the size US consumers
desire.
The leader was one of the most
popular varieties in BC: Albion. It’s a day-
neutral variety that produces large fruit to
the tune of eight kilograms a square
metre and checks in at eight degrees Brix.
Nyoko, an older Japanese variety, had
small fruit and lower yields but
exceptional avour with a Brix reading of
10 degrees.
Plant management is painful, however,
so Dr. Chieri Kubota, a professor in the
School of Plant Sciences at the University
of Arizona, continues to look for a short-
day match to Albion.
“Albion is good, but I’d like to have a
short-day variety also having a good
avour, good size, and okay yield,” she said.
Please see “STRAWBERRY” page 47
Be ready for anything.
Quality Pre-Owned Tractors & Equipment
BOBCAT BACKHOE, SKID ST MNT CALL
BOBCAT S650 SKID STEER . . . . . . 32,000
CASE MAXUM 120 PRO W/LDR . . 72,500
GASPARDO PLANTER 4 ROW . . . 35,000
JCB 409 WHEEL LOADER . . . . . . . 45,000
JD 7810 CAB, LDR, 4WD . . . . . . . . 90,000
KUBOTA L2350 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . CALL
KVERNELAND 3 BOTTOM PLOWS . CALL
MF 285 4X4 LOADER . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,000
MF 285 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,500
MASSEY FERGUSON 298 . . . . . . . . . 8,500
MILL CREEK 57 SPREADER . . . . . . . CALL
NEW HOLLAND TM150 . . . . . . . . . 47,000
NH 1033 BALE WAGON . . . . . . . . . . 7,000
RINIERI TRL150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,500
SUNFLOWER 7232 23 FT HARROW 17,500
Designed for In Furrow and On Land operations, the EO/LO are robust
ploughs requiring lower lift requirements than other brands. The 300 heavy duty
head stock provides the necessary strength for smooth reversing. The
Kverneland unique steels and the heat treatment of
the complete plough guarantee the longevity.
THE BEST PLOW IN THE WORLD
Van Der Wal Equipment (1989) Ltd.
23390 RIVER ROAD, MAPLE RIDGE, BC V2W 1B6
604/463-3681 | vanderwaleq.com
We service all makes!
Designed for heavy conditions.
The Kverneland NG-S 101 is a heavy duty power harrow for
all kinds of operations in all types of soil conditions. Robustly
designed with the Kverneland heavy-duty trough design and
Quick-Fit tines this power harrow is the right alternative for
large farms and farm contractors.
The Kverneland Taarup 9578 C and 9584 C ProLine are designed for the
toughest conditions and feature a high performance oil-bath gearbox and a
strong carrier frame. The ability to make sharp turns up to 80° and the cross
stabilizer in the headstock are unique
Kverneland features.
THE PROFESSIONAL SOLUTION.
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 43
BROWN PLATE
ROTATOR
®
FOR
HIGHEST
UNIFORMITY
1/2” & 3/4” IMPACT
REPLACEMENTS
THE ORIGINAL
BIG GUN
®
NEW! R3030
PIVOT ROTATOR
®
& 3NV NOZZLE
irrigation technology for the future
nelsonirrigation.com
®
FIND YOUR CROP SPECIFIC WATER
APPLICATION SOLUTION. Nelson
Irrigation offers a complete line of
products for a variety of applications —
finding the right one is easy. By answering
a few simple questions you can lock in on
the product that is right for you. If quality
and performance are what you expect
the answer is simple. BUY AMERICAN —
CHOOSE NELSON.
®
END OF PIVOT
SOLUTIONS —
NEW! R55, R75 &
DELTA P FOR SRNV100
O3000 ORBITOR
LOW PRESSURE
SMALL DROPLETS
Feral livestock are creating challenges for BC farmers and ranchers; some could even pose health
risks. (File photo)
by PETER MITHAM
WILLIAMS LAKE – Two years
after the province allowed
feral pigs to be killed “any
time, anywhere,” the animals
continue to spread.
The Invasive Species
Council of BC reports the
emergence of populations in
the Peace as well as southern
Vancouver Island, a fact that
troubles the council’s
executive director, Gail Wallin.
“If they are breeding, the
population could explode,”
she told the Vancouver Sun
prior to the council’s annual
meeting in early February.
She pointed to the Cariboo
region, long a hot bed for feral
wildlife, as a cautionary tale.
“We thought we had a few
pigs in one area but in talking
to ranchers we now think we
have more pigs in the
Chilcotin than we thought,”
she said.
Freedom found
A swinish multitude has
already established itself in the
wilds of the Kootenays; the
Lower Mainland and South
Okanagan may also harbor
populations. The population in
the Kootenays has been traced
to a handful of farm animals
that sought freedom – and
found it – in 2007.
But these are no Babes in
the woods: the rooting of pigs
destroys cropland and the
natural environment and
boosts disease risks in farm
elds. (Feral pigs were among
the potential sources of E. coli
O157:H7 that tainted spinach
in California in 2006, sparking
a major recall. While never
conclusively linked to the
contamination, the pigs’
presence underscored the risk
feral livestock present farmers.)
Pigs aren’t the rst feral
livestock to attract attention in
the Interior.
This winter saw free-range
horses make the news when a
Penticton woman intervened
to administer veterinary care
to one of them.
First Nations brands
While government sources
claim that many of the horses
are owned by members of the
Penticton Indian Band, the
animals are among the more
than 600 horses that call the
South Okanagan home. While
some trace their lineages back
to the Spanish, others
undoubtedly have more
recent roots, as the First
Nations brands on some
attest.
However, horses have also
been fair game for ranchers in
the Chilcotin; in 2005, six
animals belonging to a herd of
up to 200 animals in the
Brittany Triangle, southwest of
Williams Lake, were shot.
The situation, like the
incident in Penticton this
winter, underscored the
challenges facing ocials
trying to keep out invasive
species while respecting those
that have become naturalized.
Some like to see the
brighter side of things,
suggesting that horses and
pigs are as fair game for local
predators as for gun-toting
humans.
“It could take pressure o
domestic livestock,” noted
David Williams, executive
director and president of
Friends of the Nemaiah Valley,
a Victoria-based group that
supports the preservation of
the horses, in conversation
with Country Life in BC a
decade ago. “[The horses]
provide prey biomass for
predator species so it helps
sustain the main predators
which are the most
threatened species in BC …
Grizzlies and wolves and
mountain lions.”
But the stealthy pigs seem
to be keeping a hoof ahead of
predators, and that raises the
spectre for those concerned
with invasive species that they
could be as economically
damaging as starlings –
another foreign introduction –
or rabbits, the cuddly rodents
synonymous with prolic
breeding habits.
Coyotes can’t keep up
Rabbits are voracious
herbivores that have been a
problem in the Lower
Mainland where coyotes
haven’t been able to keep
them in check. They’re also a
problem on southern
Vancouver Island where
they’re a well-known sight
around the University of
Victoria campus.
However, as various rabbit
rescue operators make clear,
BC’s legion of feral pigs just the tip of wildlife woes
the best way to prevent Flopsy
and Mopsy from becoming a
problem is to not release them
into the wild in the rst place.
The same holds true for
domestic dogs, a regular
scourge of Vancouver Island
sheep farmers.
BC’s wild pigs have left the
sty, however, and there’s no
getting them back in.
However, livestock owners can
take pains to secure their
animals and prevent any
further additions to BC’s feral
menagerie.
1/3 BILLION PEOPLE LIVE IN ABSOLUTE POVERTY
841 MILLION PEOPLE ARE CHRONICALLY UNDERNOURISHED
7 MILLION CHILDREN DIE EACH YEAR DUE TO MALNUTRITION
Be someone that
Makes a Difference!
Donate a DAIRY
or BEEF animal,
TOOLS, TOYS or
GIFT CERTIFICATES
and mark your
calendars & plan to
attend this very special
fundraising event!
Free lunch courtesy of
RBC Financial Group
Donuts & coffee provided by
Hi-Pro Feeds
To confirm your donation, call:
Rob Brandsma . . . . . . . . . . . 604-834-4435
Bob Brandsma . . . . . . . . . . . 604-855-8016
Pete Brandsma . . . . . . . . . . 604-996-3141
John Bruinsma . . . . . . . . . . . 604-835-0297
Matt Dykshoorn . . . . . . . . . 604-768-0131
Sheri Kampman . . . . . . . . . 604-302-4462
Dave Martens . . . . . . . . . . . 778-982-3267
Casey Pruim . . . . . . . . . . . . 778-242-2620
Donations of cash & proceeds from cattle will be given a
charitable donation receipt from the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.
The Canadian government (through CIDA) will contribute
4:1 with matching grants on all donations.
canadianfoodgrainsbankabbotsfordauction
email: brandsma.rob@gmail.com
MAKE A DIFFERENCE SALE
THURSDAY, MARCH 24 • 10 am
McClary Stockyards, Abbotsford
Join the Farmers of BC and the Canadian Foodgrains Bank
and experience the rewards of working together to make a difference.
Proceeds from this years auction will go to support those whom
have been displaced from their homes due to conflict in Syria.
Last year, this sale raised over $160,000 for South Sudan refugees!
MAKE A DIFFERENCE SALE
THURSDAY, MARCH 24 • 10 am
McClary Stockyards, Abbotsford
Country Life in BC • March 201644
When we left o last time,
poetic justice had somehow
been served when Henderson
was bitten by a calf and
splattered with manure on the
rst day of his venture into the
veal business. At that moment,
the local busybody journalist
showed up. Rural Redemption
(part 70) continues ...
Deborah tried to sidetrack
Harriet Murray.
“Mrs. Murray, you’re here
about the Spring Musical. Let’s
go to the house and discuss it
over a cup of tea.”
“All in good time, dearie. I’d
be interested to know what’s
happened here.”
Harriet sized up Kenneth
Henderson: there was a
bandage on his thumb, a calf
manure bull’s eye on his chest
and he looked like he’d been
mugged.
“How’d you injure your
thumb, Mr. Henderson?”
“That’s no business of
yours.”
“No man is an island, hon.
Do you know you’ve got
manure all over your overalls?”
“Of course I know it.
Everyone here knows it. What
are you getting at?”
“So it’s not a secret then, if
everybody already knows. I’m
just curious how you’ve
managed to smear
manure all over
yourself?”
“I didn’t smear it all
over myself; I fell down
in the stall.”
“Tripped, did you?”
“No, I didn’t bloody trip. I
was attacked by the damned
big calf!”
Now we’re getting
somewhere, thought Harriet.
In a matter of minutes, she’d
badgered enough details out
of Kenneth Henderson to
piece together a plausible
story. Deborah put her foot
down when Harriet tried to
take a picture of Kenneth in
the barn and suggested it was
time to discuss the musical.
Kenneth Henderson was
front page news for the fourth
time in a year when the paper
came out the following
Thursday. LOCAL MAN
INJURED IN VEAL CALF
DEBACLE: Wife excited to sing
in spring.
Ordinarily, the story would
have been grist for the general
store coee club crowd for
weeks but it went virtually
unnoticed. Deborah dropped
into the store on Thursday
morning to pick up a jug of
milk she didn’t really need. She
was curious to see how badly
the calf incident had been
misconstrued. The parking
spaces in the store parking lot
were taken and there were
cars along the road as well. All
of the tables in Lon’s Coee
Corner were full and people
were standing in the aisles.
The room was abuzz with
conversation.
Deborah stood looking over
the crowd, wondering if it had
anything to do with the news
of Kenneth’s veal calf
misfortune. Lois spoke to her
from behind the counter.
“Morning, Deborah. Help
yourself to coee.”
Deborah spied the headline
in the newspaper rack.
“What’s going on?”
“You haven’t heard then?
Cec Montgomery passed last
night.”
“Eunice’s Cec?”
“Yeah. Most of the old
guard have dropped by to
remember him and start
organizing the funeral.”
“I’m so sorry.”
“No need to be. He lived a
long and happy life. He was
born and raised here and lived
his whole life among friends.
He was a bachelor until he was
way into his forties, then he
met Eunice and they’ve been
in love for 45 years. He was at
home, happy and clear-
headed right ‘til the end.
Everyone’s sad for Eunice but
they’re all here celebrating the
life Cec’s had and you won’t
nd one among them that’s
sorry for it. Did you know him?”
“No, but Gladdie introduced
me to Eunice and we’ve
crossed paths several times.”
Lois nodded.
“Gladdie was there when
Cec passed. She’s still with
Eunice now. Gladdie knew Cec
his whole life and it was her
that lit a re under him all
those years ago when Eunice
rst showed up.”
Lois chuckled at her
memory.
“It was at the hippy dance
they had to raise money for a
new roof for the hall. You’ll
probably hear all about it if
you stick around for a while.”
“Is there anything I could
do?”
“We should know what
needs doing shortly. Doug
McLeod’s been there all night
with Eunice and Gladdie and
he’s going to come by in a half
hour or so. We’ll get some idea
of what Eunice wants then.”
“Doug McLeod was there?”
“Yes. Doug worked for Cec
for years when he was a kid.
Right up until he left for
college. Cec probably would
have quit the pigs years before
if it wasn’t for Doug. Cec and
Eunice kind of treated Doug
like the son they never had and
he’s always stayed close and
looked after things for them.”
Lois excused herself and
put more coee on to brew.
Deborah poured herself a cup
and found a quiet corner near
the pet food. She thought
about Doug McLeod and how
she’d caught his eye at the
river in the summer, and how
ustered she was when he
surprised her in Tiny’s shop in
the fall and how she’d felt
when they sang together at
the Community Hall Coee
House, and the unsettling
anticipation that knotted her
stomach whenever she
thought of singing with him in
the spring musical. She tried to
explain it away as nerves, but
it was more than that.
She looked at the room full
of people come
spontaneously to the general
store to support one another
as they mourned and
remembered one of their own.
She felt Tiny Olsen’s presence.
The word community
owered in new meaning and
tears gathered in her eyes.
To be continued ...
The Woodshed
Chronicles
BOB COLLINS
Deborah is touched as the community remembers one of its own
www.oyfbc.com
Jennifer Woike, Chair
Karen Thiessen . Derek Janzen Suzanne Cuthbert . Al Timms . Chris Brown
Nomination Chair: Steve Saccomano
2016 OYF winners Jewel & Brian Pauls, Chilliwack
2016 Outstanding
BC AND YUKON REGION
YOUNG FARMERS BRIAN & JEWEL PAULS
Thank you
to our many sponsors
for their continued
support for the
Outstanding Young
Farmer Program
Congratulations & best wishes to Brian & Jewel as they represent BC
in Canada’s Outstanding Young Farmer national program later this year
BC OYF is pleased to host the national OYF competition in Penticton in 2017
2015 SPONSORS
GOLD
Farm Credit Canada
SILVER
Clearbrook Grain
BC Broiler Hatching Egg Commission
Insure wealth
MEDIA SPONSOR
Country Life in BC
INDUSTRY SPONSOR
BMO
BLACKKNIGHT PHOTO
When your business is a little off the beaten path, it is essential to keep your name in front of
your customers. What we like most about advertising in Country Life in BC
aside from
knowing it is read by our customers all over the province
is that we can provide just a bit of
information and they take that and come up with a great ad each and every issue. So we can
concentrate on other things
like selling tractors and hay equipment!
Mike Van Der Wal
Advertising that WORKS!
“A great
ad each
and every
issue”
Mike Van Der Wal
Helping you
GROW YOUR
BUSINESS
COUNTRY
Life
in BC
Advertising Inquiries
Cathy Glover
604.328.3814
cathyglover@telus.net
The agricultural news source
in British Columbia since 1915
Last month, our community
Chamber of Commerce
celebrated its annual Horizon
Business Awards, an event
that’s been going on for 20
plus years. Since moving here
in 2003, I think I’ve attended
each of these special evenings
and although I’ve always
enjoyed them, this year’s gala
seemed a bit more special
than usual. I can’t completely
explain why but there seemed
to be a fresh wave of
enthusiasm in the room.
Some of the factors I
believe are contributing to
this rising tide of interest in
the business community
include an inux of young
people with new and
innovative ideas and a strong
and growing emphasis on
local food production. It was
exciting to see a number of
awards handed out to people
I’ve not seen on the podium
before.
Of special interest to me
was the number of ag
businesses nominated for an
award. From local farmers
raising and selling chickens
and eggs to hydroponically
grown lettuce, it is evident
this community appreciates
and supports local food
production.
A bright spot discovered
On a dierent note but one
that’s directly related to
agriculture, I was saddened to
hear of the high rate of child
poverty in our neck of the
woods, yet in the midst of it
all, I also discovered a bright
spot. I sit on a planning
committee dedicated to
addressing social issues in our
community and I was
particularly interested in a
group discussion dedicated to
addressing causes and
possible or partial solutions to
that need. Without
diminishing the trauma and
struggle of living below the
poverty line (I know whereof I
speak – I grew up living in that
category), I was heartened to
hear that one of the reasons
for our higher than usual
rating was that there are some
local residents who have
chosen to have one parent
opt out of outside
employment in order to raise
their children and to work the
land. That decision may have
put them in a decit nancial
position but at the same time,
their children are beneting
from their parental input and
enjoying meals prepared from
the family garden. While not
everyone has the luxury of
such a choice, I applaud those
who avail themselves of the
opportunity when it’s a viable
option.
Mitchell Bros win!
But I digress. As awards
were handed out in various
categories, new businesses
and their owners garnered
recognition for their unique
skills, innovativeness
and superior product
quality. It did my
heart good to see
the excitement and
enthusiasm
demonstrated by
and for each winner.
Then came the nal
presentation: … ”The winner
of the Business of the Year
award goes to … drum roll …
Mitchell Bros. Merchants.”
The place resounded with
excitement. This family-
owned grocery store,
complete with original wood
oors, has been in business
since 1946. Peter Mitchell,
owner, has been it’s manager
since 1981. To me that
moment cemented the
importance and strength of
businesses that have carried
on in spite of every
imaginable challenge. Over
the years, they’ve employed
local residents, supported
community projects and
provided retail and hospitality
outlets for those of us living
in this geographically-isolated
part of the West Coast.
My thoughts moved on to
those sometimes forgotten
but dedicated individuals who
established and served
(sometimes, continue to
serve) in volunteer and non-
prot organizations in our –
and in your – town.
There will always be the
need for new members and
new ideas (things otherwise
vision and mission would get
pretty stale) but no matter
how great the need for those
elements, let’s never lose our
appreciation for those who
have laid foundations,
persevered and kept
lamplights burning
throughout the years.
As one generation of
farmer passes the torch to the
next and as consumers re-
discover the power of local
food sustainability, everyone
benets. That’s cause for great
celebration, business awards
or not.
Celebrating the
passing of the torch
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 45
A Wannabe Farmer
LINDA WEGNER
ALDERBROVE
200-3350 260th Street
1-800-337-8399
CLOVERDALE
17982 Hwy 10
1-800-363-9993
WEST KELOWNA
1725 Byland Road
1-877-322-2382
www.sunrisetrailersales.com
3 Locations – Call Toll Free
Sundowner
Aluminum
Stock
Trailers
Gooseneck or
Bumper Pull
0 DOWN
FINANCING
OAC
Trails
West
HOT SHOT!
Gooseneck or
Bumper Pull
ALDERGROVE
FREE
SPARE WHEELS
& TIRES WITH
THIS AD
FROM $9,499 or O DOWN/$225 MO OAC
FROM $9,499 or O DOWN/$225 MO OAC
20’ FROM $23,999 or O DOWN/$324 MO OAC
20’ FROM $23,999 or O DOWN/$324 MO OAC
Aquaponic growers honoured
by LINDA WEGNER
POWELL RIVER – Sunshine
Coast Aquaponics, a
relatively new start-up
specializing in
aquaponically-grown fresh
greens, has won one of the
Powell River Chamber of
Commerce’s top awards.
This year, eleven
nominees in the agriculture
category represented
operations ranging from a
popular annual publication
that celebrates local
agriculture to family-owned
operations such as Funky
Beets Farm. Other nominees
included several local
garden shops, a feed store
and a number of area-based
growers and retailers. At
7300 square feet, Sunshine
Coast Aquaponics is the
largest commercial
aquaponics operation in BC.
The chamber introduced
the agricultural award to its
Horizon Business Awards in
2013 in response to a
growing number of requests.
Since then, the number and
type of food production
nominees has steadily
increased.
For the sta at Home
Grown, the endorsement
was appreciated.
“It was nice to get a
nomination recognizing
what Home Grown does for
Business partners and brothers-in-law Don Nahorney, left, and
Je Keir, of Sunshine Coast Aquaponics, were honoured by the
Powell River Chamber of Commerce last month. (Photo
courtesy of Powell River Peak)
the ag community.
Communication is a huge
challenge for growers
because they’re usually so
busy growing stu, it’s
dicult for them to promote
what they do. Our little niche
magazine helps ll that void
and it tells their stories to the
community. Plus, it tells
residents where they can get
local food,” says Powell River
Living associate publisher
Sean Percy.
Jim Keir, from Sunshine
Coast Aquaponics, says
winning the award was
“humbling.
“It was also appreciated
and honouring in that the
town can see the uniqueness
of this growing style,” he
adds. “It felt really felt good
and validating of our
foresight into growing
[hydroponically].”
SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Please mail to
1120 East 13th Ave Vancouver, BC V5T 2M1
604.871.0001
The agricultural news source in
British Columbia since 1915
COUNTRY
Life
Y
in BC
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
POSTAL CODE
TEL EMAIL
(Prices include GST | Cheque or money order only please)
o NEW o RENEWAL | o 1 YEAR ($18.90) o 2 YEAR ($33.60) o 3 YEAR ($37.80)
Join thousands of BC farmers who turn to Country Life in BC every month
to find out what (and who!) is making news in BC agriculture and how it
may affect their farms and agri-businesses!
NEWS & INFORMATION YOU (& YOUR FRIENDS) NEED!
www.countrylifeinbc.com
SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
Country Life in BC • March 201646
Finally, spring’s bounty of produce is making its way onto
our plates with a variety of greens, maybe the rst few young
peas and lots of other locally-grown vegetables available to
inspire us to put fresh, local, healthy meals on the table.
A quick tour of the local farmers’ market is enough to make a
food lover swoon after the sameness of winter’s local fare. Now
we have a range of fresh
foods from spinach and
a wide variety of
lettuces, to baby peas
and asparagus and other
sprouts.
It’s a grand time of
year to enjoy eating healthy, with all the makings for various
salads fresh and full of avour and lots of baby vegetables
calling out to be eaten throughout the day.
As winter draws to a close, and the spring equinox March 19
heralds a new season, the hours of light are much longer than
they were deep in winter and the temperatures a bit more
moderate, so it seems appropriate to begin lightening up our
food as well.
I must admit I’m getting a little tired of dried, frozen and
canned food – and even stored squashes and apples. I’m ready
to have some produce that’s fresh right from the eld.
Check the chive patch and see if any have sprouted yet.
They’re usually one of the rst herbs to emerge in spring and
with their fresh, delicate onion-y avour, they perk up all sorts
of dishes.
Along with your green beer March 17, serve a big green
dinner salad, whether it’s a huge bowl full of various fresh
greens topped with slivers of lean chicken, seafood or steak, or
a more-substantial salad such as the one below, served with
fresh, local seafood.
March this year closes with Easter crammed in there as well,
and a great way to use up some of those ham leftovers is this
very-comforting casserole of ham and spuds stued with
cheese and spinach and onions as well. It’s a favourite around
our house.
This is very tasty and can very easily be varied according to what’s available and what your
family likes. It’s a meal in one dish so very convenient. It’s a terric way to get another family
meal from the roasted ham you served at Easter. Can be doubled to ll more tummies.
1/2 lb. (227 g) ham 1 c. (250 ml) cheese salt and pepper, to taste
1 onion 1 tbsp. (15 ml) butter 1/2 c. (125 ml) milk
1 large russet potato 1 tbsp. (15 ml) our dash of Worcestershire sauce
2 c. (500 ml) spinach Pinch of paprika
Pre-heat oven to 350 F.
Chop ham into half-inch dice; thinly slice onion, scrubbed potatoes and fresh spinach; and
grate cheddar or other cheese of your choice.
Lightly spray a casserole dish with oil and arrange one-third of the potato slices on the bottom
of the dish, followed by half the onions, half the spinach and ham and a third of the cheese.
Sprinkle half of the bits of the butter over it, then half the our and a little paprika, salt and
pepper.
Repeat with another third of the potato slices, the remainder of the onions, half the remaining
cheese and the rest of the spinach and ham.
Finish o the bits of butter and the our and a little more paprika, salt and pepper.
Top with the remaining potato slices and top with the rest of the cheese.
Combine the milk and Worcestershire sauce and pour over the top.
Bake, covered, for about 30 minutes, then remove the lid and cook until the potatoes are
tender, about 20 or 25 minutes longer.
Serves 2-3.
Jude’s Kitchen
JUDIE STEEVES
Bring on spring!
Potatoes, ham and spinach casserole has something for all tastes. (Judie Steeves photo)
Please see “DENʼS” page 43
I was worried they’d find something
Mammograms save lives. Make an appointment, not an excuse. Get expert advice and
share your stories at
gohave1.com
Ham, Spinach & Spud Casserole
March 2016 • Country Life in BC 47
Crisp and fresh, lean and light, this salad is perfect for a lighter meal and it’s very exible. Make
it as a dressed salad over big salad leaves, or a mix of greens or lettuce or wrap it up in a lettuce
leaf or a tortilla for a st-food dinner. Pair this with the CedarCreek 2014 Pinot Gris, which is
delicious with seafood.
2 green onions 1 tbsp. (15 ml) mayonnaise Sea salt and fresh-ground pepper, to taste
1 stalk of celery 1 tbsp. (15 ml) cream cheese 1/4 lb. (120 g) crab or shrimp
2 tbsp. (30 ml) fresh parsley 1/2 tsp. (2 ml) lemon juice 2 tbsp. (30 ml) fresh raw peas
Mince green onions, celery and parsley. Combine mayonnaise, cream cheese, lemon juice and
parsley until well-mixed in a medium-sized bowl. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Mix in the green onions, celery and parsley and then gently fold in the crab meat, shrimp or
other seafood and most of the peas. Garnish with a few of the fresh, raw green peas or some
parsley. Serves 2.
DENʼS SEAFOOD SALAD From page 46
STRAWBERRY GROWERS NEED TO BE COST CONSCIOUS From page 42
troughs, similar to what some growers in the
Lower Mainland use to prevent their plants from
getting wet feet. Similarly, the troughs provide a
more amenable and forgiving environment for
the roots in greenhouse systems while providing
a more ergonomic environment for workers.
Kubota recommends two litres of substrate to
accommodate strawberries’ extensive root
systems.
“Root zone environment for strawberries is
very important. They are so sensitive to
everything, but particularly [the] root zone
environment,” Kubota said
A pH of 5.5 to 6.5 is ideal, while nitrogen and
potassium requirements are smaller than for
tomatoes and other greenhouse crops.
Above ground, the daytime air temperature
should be in the range of 18 to 24 degrees
Celsius, while the night-time air temperature
should be approximately 10 to 13 degrees
Celsius.
“This is for the owers, the size, and also for
the sugar accumulation,” Kubota said. “If you
want very avourful strawberries, you’ve got to
look at the [night-time] temperature.”
Humidity, as in other crops, is critical to
ensure plant and fruit quality, and avoid burn at
the leaf tips and calyx. Kubota devised an under-
the-trough system that maintains an ambient
environment around the plants.
“It seems to work really well, except the time
we are heating a lot,” she said. “So now we are
trying to develop a strategy that even works the
nights we have to heat from the beginning of
the night.”
Production costs
Since strawberries in North America don’t
command the prices seen in Asia, growers need
to be cost-conscious when managing their crop.
Kubota said production costs in her test
greenhouse are approximately US$3.81 per
plant, with one plant per square foot. The break-
even price given an average yield of nine
kilograms per square metre (1.84 pounds per
square foot) is about US$2.59 a pound.
“You need to sell much higher than this,
obviously,” she told growers. “If you have to
compete with California, you need to create a
very niche market – local, niche, avour-driven,
quality-driven market.”
Additional information on greenhouse
strawberry production is available at
[www.cals.arizona.edu/strawberry].
NAME ____________________________________________
OLD ADDRESS ______________________________________
__________________________________________________
PHONE ____________________________________________
NEW ADDRESS ______________________________
__________________________________________________
PHONE ____________________________________________
COUNTRY
Life
in BC
Canada Post will not deliver your
Country Life in BC if they change
your postal code, your street name
and/or address. If your address
changes, please fill out the form
below and mail or fax it to us, or
use email.
Thank you!
1120 East 13th Ave
Vancouver, B.C. V5T 2M1
Email: countrylifeinbc@shaw.ca
Phone 604/871-0001 • Fax: 604/871-0003
Mar 16
CHANGE
OF
ADDRESS?
Lola!
NEW POLYETHYLENE
TANKS
of all shapes & sizes for septic and water
storage. Ideal for irrigation, hydroponics,
washdown, lazy wells, rain water, truck
box, fertizilizer mixing & spraying.
Call 1-800-661-4473
for closest distributor.
Web: [www.premierplastics.com]
Manufactured in Delta by
Premier Plastics Inc.
CLASSIFIED
DEADLINE FOR APRIL 2016 ISSUE: MARCH 20
25 words or less, minimum $10 plus GST • Each additional word: $0.25
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED: $20 plus GST per column inch
1120 East 13th Avenue, Vancouver V5T 2M1
Phone: 604/871-0001 • Fax: 604/871-0003
E-mail: countrylifeinbc@shaw.ca
Web: www.countrylifeinbc.com
NEW/USED EQUIPMENT
CASH FOR BATTERIES
DON’T THROW AWAY
THOSE OLD BATTERIES
THEY ARE WORTH MONEY!
We recycle all types of batteries, lead acid to
forklift industrials ... and the best part is we
pay you cash on the spot.
Will buy your
scrap forklifts, too!
David at 778/668-4890
Quick Cash 4 Batteries
FOR SALE
CORN SILAGE FOR SALE
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
FOB CURTIS FARM, ARMSTRONG
PRICE DEPENDS ON VOLUME
PHONE TED 250/260-0009
OR PHONE TXT DAVID
250/308-8121
EZEE-ON
FRONT END LOADERS
#125 Hi-Lift, c/w 8’ bucket, $4,000
#90 c/w Q/A 7’ bucket
& Q/A bale spike, $3,500
Both are in excellent condition.
Call 250/567-2607
(Vanderhoof)
HAY FOR SALE, ALFALFA AND ALFALFA
grass mix. Big and midsize squares. Call
250/567-3287.
LIVESTOCK
LOOKING FOR A JOB?
NEED EMPLOYEES?
www.agri-labourpool.com
604-823-6222
SINCE 1974
EMPLOYMENT
REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS HEIFERS -
show stock. In September we bought two
high-end calves from Remitall Farms, AB,
for $4,000 ea. to start an elite herd.
Unfortunatley, we now must sell them.
Sired by “Prospector” and “Cudlobe 5S.”
From very special dams. we farm in
Saanich. Please make an offer. Phone
250/652-4148.
FURTHER REDUCTION IN FLOCK SIZE after
36 years of specializing in PB Dorsets, and
white and coloured Romneys. All matures
are registered, but can sell without papers:
lambs as requested. Genetically selected for
desirable qualities - production, correct
conformation, and detailed attention to
health. Discount on 3 or more head. For
larger numbers may be able to help arrange
transport. Call 604/462-9465.
EQUIPMENT DISPERSAL:
OVERUM HD 3 BOTTOM PLOW, spring
trip bottoms skimmers coulters $3,000;
IRRIGATION PACKAGE w/Perkins 4 cyl
diesel with pump on trailer, pipe wagon
with 11 5” pipes, & 24 4” pipes, complete
$5,000.
CARRARO 110/400 IRRIGATION REEL,
w/Nelson 150 gun, 9 HP Honda, good
condition, $12,500.
TWO BADGER 16’ TANDEM AXLE silage
wagons, w/roofs, shop stored, excellent
condition, $6,500 ea.
16’ DUTCH CAST CHAIN HARROW, good,
$950.
Call Tony 604/850-4718.
Toll Free 1-888-357-0011
www.ultra-kelp.com
ULTRA-KELP
TM
Celebrating 30 Years
Serving Western Canadian Agriculture
100% Natural
Animal Feed Supplement
& Fertilizer
Flack’s Bakerview
Kelp Products Inc
Pritchard, BC
Heavy duty oil field pipe bale feeders. Feed
savers, single round bale feeders outside
measurement is 8’x8.5’ Double round bale
feeder measurement is 15’x8’. Silage bunk
feeders. Prices start at $900. Also Drill
Pipe 2 3/8” or 2 7/8” by appr. 30’ long.
Call Dan 250/308-9218 Coldstream, BC
CATTLE AND HORSE FEEDERS
FOR SALE
These feeders maintain their value!
DeBOER’S USED
TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT
GRINDROD, BC
JD 6400 MFWD w/ldr 29,500
JD 6400 mfwd cab sl ldr 49,000
JD 6410 mfwd cab sl ldr 54,000
JD 4240 cab 3pt hitch 18,500
JD 1120 dsl ldr rb canopy SOLD
JD 220 disk 19 ft W center fold 14,500
JD 220 disk 20 ft W center fold
new blades 16,500
JD 2130 diesel, 66 HP 10,500
Kvernland 4X16 plow 3 pt 3,250
JD 1830 diesel, with loader 10,500
JD 7400 MFWD c/w cab, 3 pt, ldr
with grapple, new frt & rear tires 64,000
Ed DeBoer • 250/838-7362
cell 250/833-6699
Curt DeBoer • 250/838-9612
cell 250/804-6147
Country Life in BC • March 201648
The New M7 offers superior hydraulics and sophisticated
control to get the job done quickly and efficiently. Kubotas
V6108 engine delivers 168, 148, or 128 HP (3 models).
THE KUBOTA M7
COMING SOON
Power is the key to superior tractor
performance, and the M7 has plenty of power.
But when a particularly tough job demands
even more power, the M7 activates its Power Boost,
and the engine instantly delivers more power
to let you finish what you started.
CLEAN, DEPENDABLE,
FUEL-EFFICIENT POWER
AND PLENTY OF IT.
Your BC Kubota Dealers ...
ABBOTSFORD AVENUE MACHINERY CORP 604/864-2665
COURTENAY NORTH ISLAND TRACTOR 250/334-0801
CRESTON KEMLEE EQUIPMENT LTD 250/428-2254
DAWSON CREEK DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT 250/782-5281
DUNCAN ISLAND TRACTOR & SUPPLY LTD 250/746-1755
KAMLOOPS DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT 250/851-2044
KELOWNA AVENUE MACHINERY CORP 250/769-8700
OLIVER GERARD’S EQUIPMENT LTD 250/498-2524
PRINCE GEORGE HUBER EQUIPMENT 250/560-5431
QUESNEL DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT 250/991-0406
VERNON AVENUE MACHINERY CORP 250/545-3355