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Vol. 102 No. 1
Preview 18th Pacific Ag Show will have more exhibits, variety 7
Trade US repeals COOL for Canadian beef and pork 19
Technology Non-browning GMO Arctic apple shows promise 35
Life
in BC
The agricultural news source in
British Columbia since 1915
Vol. 102 No. 1 • January 2016
New ag
plan sets
optimistic
goals
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD The BC Agriculture Council
is “disappointed” with a recent report from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives titled
Citizenship and Precarious Labour in Canadian
Agriculture.
Authored by Mexican-born Simon Fraser
University sociology professor Gerardo Otero
and University of Guelph sociologist Kerry
Preibisch, the report discusses how citizenship
status aects agricultural employment. It is
based on questionnaires with 200 farmworkers
and over 50 interviews with farmworkers,
growers, industry representatives, advocacy
groups and Canadian and Mexican civil
servants.
The report claims the South Asian
immigrant and Mexican migrant workers who
make up most of BC’s agricultural workforce
are low-paid workers subject to “coercive
employment practices with serious
consequences for health and safety.”
It claims poor working conditions are
“rampant” in the industry.
The report makes ve main
recommendations:
• If the market requires more workers, more
immigration permits should be given so new
immigrants qualify for permanent residency
from the start.
• The BC government should establish an
employment compliance team with random
spot-checks at worksites.
Please see “OLD NEWS” page 2
Y
COUNTRY
Ag council pans farm labour report
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VANCOUVER
Everybody wants to
see BC’s agriculture, agrifood and
seafood sectors grow but not everyone
agrees on how to achieve that growth.
On December 2, BC Minister of
Agriculture Norm Letnick joined BC
agrifood and seafood leaders at
Commissary Connect, a small
commercial kitchen in Vancouver, to
launch the government’s Strategic
Growth Plan for the sector. At the same
time, NDP agriculture critic Lana
Popham and Independent MLA Vicki
Huntington were at the Legislature in
Victoria to release the rst report of the
Opposition Standing Committee for
Agriculture and Food.
The Strategic Growth Plan updates
the 2012 BC Agrifoods Strategy and
When your day job has the word “cowboy” anywhere in its description, there is no such thing as a snow day; the job still
must get done no matter what the weather! Corben Clarkson, Willee Twan and Cody Popson have just sorted and penned
one group of feedlot calves and are returning to sort yet another group, even though visibility was severely challenged by
the big-akes blowin' about in the snowstorm. (Liz Twan photo)
Whiteout
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Agriculture Council director
Rhonda Driediger, a Langley
berry grower and packer, gave
the strategy her conditional
approval.
“I think the agriculture
industry will be happy with the
plan once we have had a
chance to review it,” she said.
Strengthen Buy Local
She praised the
government’s commitment to
increase industry
competitiveness, production
acreage and yields, and
strengthen BC’s Buy Local
culture, but stressed the need
for government to ensure
there is adequate funding to
make that happen.
The six-member Opposition
Committee based its report
UPDATED PLAN From page 1
Country Life in BC • January 20162
OLD NEWS From page 1
agricultural producers.
The government’s strategy
identies 20 actions to
increase production, drive
competitiveness and build
domestic, interprovincial and
international markets.
25 recommendations
The opposition’s report
makes 25 recommendations to
reduce regulatory, nancial
and administrative barriers;
help new and small farm
operators; increase knowledge
and information sharing,
training and technical
assistance; adapt to climate
change; promote BC farm
products and businesses,
restrict the use of the
Agricultural Land Reserve for
carbon sequestration or other
non-farm uses, particularly by
non-residents; and increase
funding for young farmers.
Climate change is a new
focus for both the government
and the opposition reports.
The government has also
taken up the mantra of “food
security,” with Letnick claiming
strategies to increase export
growth will improve domestic
food security.
“It puts more land into
production which can be
redirected to domestic
markets” if the need arises, he
said.
The government developed
its strategy in collaboration
with the minister’s Agrifood
Advisory Committee (MAAC)
which includes leaders of the
agrifood and seafood sectors,
business community, local
food movement and
agricultural post-secondary
institutions.
MAAC member and BC
• The BC Medical Plan should
be revised to give
agricultural workers health
coverage immediately upon
arrival.
• BC should adopt Manitoba’s
2009 Worker Recruitment
and Protection Act and
register migrant employers
and recruiters so they can be
held accountable if they
violate workers’ rights.
• Greater attention must be
placed on the safe
transportation and housing
of farmworkers, including
enforcement, mid-season
inspections and assessments.
BCAC executive director
Reg Ens says a lot of the
claims in the report are “old
news” and the issues it
identies have been
addressed.
While he admits agriculture
is a dangerous environment,
he insists worker safety is “a
critical issue for us,” saying
“people who are treated well
work better.
“The industry continues to
invest time and energy to
improve worker health and
safety conditions,” he adds.
In 2016, migrant worker
housing will be approved by
certied housing inspectors.
As well, Seasonal Agricultural
Worker Program (SAWP)
workers receive private health
insurance coverage which is
as good or better than that
available through BC Medical
from the day they arrive.
The report also claims
SAWP workers are vulnerable
to exploitation as they enter
Canada with “time-limited,
employer-specic work
permits.”
However, Ens counters that
by saying SAWP workers have
options and can reach out to
their consulate if they’re not
happy.
“The consulates inspected
about 60 facilities last summer
and have the power to
prevent employers from
participating in the program if
they do not comply with
requirements,” he points out.
has a goal of increasing overall
sector revenues to $15 billion
per year by 2020. The 2012
strategy set a goal of $14
billion per year by 2017.
By 2014, revenues had
reached $12.3 billion. That
includes total sales of $2.9
billion from primary
agriculture, $0.8 billion from
seafood and $8.5 billion in
manufacturers’ shipments. Of
that, $3 billion came from the
export market.
Letnick said the 2012 plan
needed to be updated since
“we completed 47 of the 49
action steps in three years.”
The remaining two action
items are included in the new
strategy which Letnick says
provides clear direction for the
sector to achieve economic
growth, adapt to climate
change and maintain food
supply security.
The Opposition Committee
says government must do
more to improve the business
environment for BC
and recommendations on
input it received from written
submissions and public
meetings across the province
in April, May, June and
September.
“We listened to a range of
voices from dierent regions
and made recommendations
based on their feedback,”
Popham said. “We heard no
shortage of concern from
presenters about climate
change and food security, the
lack of accessible meat
processing facilities, non-
resident ownership of BC
farmland and costly dam
regulations for ranchers. Our
recommendations highlight a
number of areas in need of
more attention from the
provincial government.”
Huntington said the
committee provided a forum
for British Columbians to
bring their concerns and
priorities to legislators, saying
that emphasizes the need to
re-establish the Select
Standing Committee on
Agriculture.
“People across the province
deserve a hearing when
decisions are being made that
aect the future of agriculture
in BC,” she said. “The
government could do a lot of
good by simply reinstating
the committee.”
Sarb Mund of Commissary Connect, Port Moody-Coquitlam MLA Linda Reimer, BC Minister of
Agriculture Norm Letnick and BC Agriculture Council director Rhonda Driediger unveil the new BC
Agrifood and Seafood strategic growth plan at Commissary Connect in Vancouver, December 2.
(David Schmidt photo)
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC 3
Diafiltered milk biggest
challenge for dairy industry
TPP compromise was “small price to pay” in maintaining supply management
Dairy Farmers of Canada president Wally Smith. (David Schmidt
photo)
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VANCOUVER Dairy
producers dodged a bullet in
the Trans Pacic Partnership
(TPP) negotiations but they
still face plenty of challenges,
Dairy Farmers of Canada (DFC)
president Wally Smith told the
BC Dairy Conference in
Vancouver, November 24.
Although the Canadian
dairy industry had to give up
3.25% of its market in the TPP,
representing an annual
revenue loss of $190-240
million, Smith called it “a small
price to pay for maintaining
supply management for
another generation.” Other
‘wins’ include protecting the
Canadian Dairy Commission as
a state-owned enterprise and
maintaining Canadian cheese
standards.
Compensation, not subsidy
Smith trumpeted the
Conservative’s promised $4.3
billion compensation package
for supply management, but it
was never passed by Cabinet,
meaning the new Liberal
government is not bound to
honour it. He insisted the
package does not represent a
subsidy; instead, he calls it
compensation for “an
expropriation of some of my
property.”
With the conclusion of the
European and TPP trade
negotiations, DFC is shifting its
attention to the Agreement on
Internal Trade (AIT), which
governs interprovincial trade.
The AIT is now being rewritten
and DFC wants to ensure
supply management is
maintained “so we have the
same assurances provincially
as federally.”
The biggest challenge
facing the Canadian dairy
industry is not trade but the
increasing ow of dialtered
milk into Canada. At 85%
protein, dialtered milk (also
known as MPI – milk protein
isolate) is “almost a solid.” BC
Milk Marketing Board chair Jim
Byrne notes processors use it
extensively in making cheese
as it allows them to “get more
cheese out of the vat.”
“Ingredient”
The Canadian Border
Services Agency denes it as
an “ingredient,” meaning it is
not subject to either taris or
volume restrictions when it
comes into Canada. As soon as
it crosses the border, however,
the Canadian Food Inspection
Agency calls it “milk,” meaning
it can be used in cheese.
Bureaucratic solutions
“We have asked (the new)
government to make this the
highest priority for the dairy
industry,” Smith said, adding
DFC wants a political solution
“because we never win in
bureaucratic solutions.”
“We can’t leave it the way it
is,” Byrne added.
He pointed out Canada
imported 60% more MPI’s in
2015 than the year previous,
saying that has led to two
other problems. Because
processors now use more
cream to “balance” the cheese
mix, there is not enough
cream left to produce the
butter required, leading to a
serious butter shortage. It has
also increased the mountain of
skim milk powder (SMP),
reducing that value.
“We were selling SMP at
$4,000 per tonne a year ago,
now it’s $1,750 per tonne,”
Byrne stated.
“We are working on an
ingredient strategy with the
processors to address this,” he
said.
Because of their use of
foreign product, Smith said
the major processors asked
DFC to suspend its “little blue
cow” logo before they would
discuss the ingredient issue.
“The blue cow aects their
margins,” he noted.
Logo awareness
That’s a non-starter for DFC
as it has put a lot of eort into
getting Canadians aware of
the logo, which identies
products made of “100%
Canadian milk.”
“We are linking the blue
cow with our proAction
initiative,” Smith said.
He said the eort is having
some success, noting Tim
Horton’s is “bound and
determined” to use only all-
Canadian products.
“That helps us,” Smith said,
adding it is now up to
consumers to “pressure
retailers for more blue cow
products on the shelf.”
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Under the Terms of the Bylaws of the Association
Members are Directed to Take Notice of the
127th Annual General Meeting of the
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FRUIT GROWERS’ ASSOCIATION
January 29-30, 2016
At the RAMADA HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTRE, KELOWNA
FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2016 BUSINESS SESSION (1 PM–5 PM)
Annual Report of the Executive;
Financial statements, budget, and any Special Resolutions;
Annual reports of subsidiaries:
• BC Research and Development Orchard Ltd.
• Summerland Varieties Corporation;
Guest speakers and reports of industry organizations and companies;
Committee reports and resolutions for delegate consideration.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2016 POLICY SESSION (8:30 AM–2 PM)
• Guest speakers and reports of industry organizations & companies;
• Special reports;
• Committee reports and resolutions for delegate consideration;
• Election of the BCFGA Executive at 2:00 pm
SOCIAL - A Social will be held on Friday evening. All members and
government and industry organization representatives are invited to
attend the social from 6 – 8 pm on Friday, January 29 at the
Ramada Hotel & Conference Centre, Kelowna.
BC FRUIT GROWERS’ ASSOCIATION office:
880 Vaughan Avenue, Kelowna, BC V1Y 7E4
250-762-5226 (T) (250) 861-9089 (F) www.bcfga.com
All members and industry and
government representatives welcome.
Lunch provided on Saturday.
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Last September, the BC Ministry of Agriculture
released a document titled Regulating Agri-tourism
and Farm Retail Sales in the Agricultural Land Reserve;
Discussion Paper and Proposed Minister’s Bylaw
Standards. The executive summary invites review
and feedback from local governments preparatory
to the development of a Minister’s Bylaw Standard
to guide local governments in developing bylaws
regulating agri-tourism and farm retail sales on the
ALR.
The last item in the document is an invitation to
stakeholders in general to weigh in on the
conversation. The discussion was scheduled to close
on November 30 but the deadline has been
extended to January 15. The extended deadline
likely indicates wide-spread concern and comment
from the “stakeholder” constituency.
Agri-tourism and farm retail sales in the ALR are
regulated by the Agricultural Land Commission,
which details permitted uses and circumstances.
Both uses are increasingly important components of
many BC farms and both have been actively
encouraged by the ministry itself. In the 1990’s,
government funded the establishment of the BC
Agri-tourism Alliance to grow the sector and provide
input on its behalf. Former ministry staer Brent
Warner was (and is) a highly regarded and tirelessly
supportive agri-tourism and direct farm marketing
specialist. There were even legislative changes made
to allow certain types and amounts of on-farm
accommodation. Inevitably, as these activities and
uses increase and evolve, some of them will end up
on the wrong side of the ALC’s regulatory fence.
In early November, new ALC chair Frank Leonard
spoke to the directors and various members of
agricultural committees of the Alberni Clayoquat
Regional District. Leonard outlined plans to double
or perhaps triple the number of compliance and
enforcement personnel, explaining that there have
been 600 ALC cease and desist orders issued that
have never been checked for compliance. Although
Leonard did not indicate what number of
complaints and violations pertained to agri-tourism
and farm retail sales, it is likely they are driving the
proposed Minister’s Bylaw Standard discussion.
Two tiers of agri-tourism activity
The purpose of the ALC (short version) is to
preserve agricultural land, encourage farming and
encourage governments not to throw a regulatory
wrench in the works. To this end, the ALC has
established two tiers of agri-tourism activities; Tier 1,
permitted activities, and Tier 2, activities/events that
require ALC approval. The list of permitted activities
includes all of the usual ag related events: u-pick,
pumpkin patch, school tours, livestock shows, farm
stays, etc. Some of the events that require approval
seem like no brainers: mini train parks and
helicopter tours for instance. Others, less so. Some
of the activities, like hosting a wedding on the farm,
seem less likely to subvert the ALC’s purposes. To its
credit, the ALC has not outright banned Tier 2
activities or events; they merely require approval.
We might wonder, though, what criteria determine
the granting or denial of approval. What are the
odds of success? What is the time frame for
approval? What does an application cost? These are
not questions that rightly fall within the Minister’s
Bylaw Standards discussion, but the intention of
increased enforcement from the ALC and the
likelihood of more stringent bylaw regulation are
raising concerns for many agri-tourism operators.
There are another set of criteria within the ALC
regulations that govern all agri-tourism activities.
Most of the activities must be of a temporary or
seasonal nature, and the income derived from any
of them must not exceed the income derived from
regular farm income. But what of the Okanagan
orchardist who loses a crop to frost or hail. Must he
or she then apply for approval to sustain the agri-
tourism component of their business? Common
sense would say that there should be exceptions
made, but bureaucracies seldom become more
exible as they grow.
Agri-tourism and farm retail sales are critical to
the continued nancial success of many BC farms.
While these activities should not thwart the general
intent of the ALR or provide an opportunity do an
end run around it altogether, there needs to be
sucient exibility in the regulations and their
application to allow bona de farmers and ranchers
to continue to engage in agri-tourism and farm
marketing activities that do not negatively impact
the current or future agricultural use of their land.
A download of the discussion paper is available
at: [www2.gov.bc.ca]. (Search for agri-tourism bylaw
standard.)
Editor & Publisher Peter Wilding
Phone: 604/871-0001 • Fax: 604/871-0003
E-mail: countrylifeinbc@shaw.ca • Web: countrylifeinbc.com
Associate Editor David Schmidt
Phone: 604-793-9193
E-mail: davidschmidt@shaw.ca
Advertising Sales & Marketing Cathy Glover
Phone: 604/328-3814
E-mail: cathyglover@telus.net
Production Ass’t: Ann Morris • Senior Researcher: Phil “Xavier” Gordon
COUNTRY
Life
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Vol. 102 No. 1
January 2016
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Flexibility, common sense needed for agri-tourism regs
The Back 40
BOB COLLINS
Country Life in BC • January 20164
Hope springs eternal, especially at the
end of one year and the beginning of
another.
But the hard reality is that the changes
often needed to fulfil our hopes are hard to
come by.
Consider this: in studies of patients who
required bypass surgery, 90% couldn’t
make the changes needed to avoid future
treatment, let alone prevent an early death.
Kickstart those changes with a year of
programmed support, however, and the
lifestyle changes needed to make a
difference took root, with 77% of patients
keeping up their newfound health regime
three years later.
The studies suggest opportunities for
growing BC’s agriculture sector – and not
just through sales of heart-friendly foods
that keep patients on the right track.
Agriculture minister Norm Letnick
announced Victoria’s goal to boost the
province’s agri-food sales to $15 billion a
year by 2020. Sales totalled $12.3 billion in
2014, including approximately $3 billion in
farmgate revenues. Stronger exports this
year will likely see 2015 sales exceed $13
billion.
Bringing new land into production and
boosting exports are two key ways that
government wants to achieve its goals. But
growers have consistently pointed out that
more support is needed to generate
success.
Rhonda Driediger, echoing long-
standing calls from the BC Fruit Growers
Association for government to boost its
funding of the agriculture sector relative to
GDP, said government funding needs to be
up to the task.
Opposition MLAs heard similar concerns
during a series of hearings on the
agriculture sector last year, with calls for
investment in everything from extension
workers to the work of the Agricultural
Land Commission and other coordinating
bodies. Conservation officers and those
charged with enforcing the laws and
regulations governing agriculture in the
province are also needed.
It’s a brand new year, and here’s hoping
it comes with the resolve of government to
adequately support the common goal of
prosperity and success for BC farmers.
Change we can support
2016
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First, the bad news. Farmers
around the world did a great
job last year. The good news?
Farmers around the world did
a great job last year.
Such is the unfortunate
reality of the grain market. As
speakers at last fall’s Cereals
North America conference in
Winnipeg said, the world is
“awash with grain,” which has
driven prices into the
doldrums. Unless there’s some
“good” news (perversely, as in
someone else having a poor
crop), it seems there is little
chance of a turnaround any
time soon.
It’s been a long time since
we heard as much bearish
news as we did at last
November’s conference. The
two words “set aside” even
surfaced, a reference to the
1950s to 1980s US policy of
paying farmers not to grow
crops in order to reduce
supplies and increase the
price. That was combined
with holding government-
owned stocks in reserve, and
not releasing them until they
reached a target level.
Freedom to Farm
Those policies worked but
in the 1980s the US
government said it was tired
of being the only one holding
up prices and accused
competitors of taking
advantage of them with all-
out production. That led to
the Export Enhancement
Program, which gave
government-held stocks to
exporters as a bonus for
making sales, and eventually
to the “Freedom to Farm”
policy in 1995. That meant
that farmers were free to grow
as much as they liked and
subsidy programs would be
based on revenue, not
production.
The US government further
juiced production with biofuel
subsidies and more than 40%
of the corn crop is not used
for ethanol. That was in the
“We’re going to run out of oil
and be held hostage to the
Saudis” days. Today, we’re in
the “US is almost self-sucient
in oil” days. Now, gasoline is
cheaper than ethanol and US
overall fuel consumption has
dropped, so ethanol demand
has stalled.
Soaring greenback
The subsequent strength of
the US economy combined
with other world troubles has
meant that the greenback has
soared compared to other
currencies. On one hand,
that’s been good news for
Canadian producers. The
weaker loonie has partly oset
prices relative to the US. The
bad news is that other
currencies have dropped
much further. If you’re a
Brazilian soybean producer,
it’s party time. In Brazilian
reals, soybean producers are
receiving as much as they did
in 2012 when the price was
US$17 per bushel. So there’s
even more incentive for them
to continue all-out
production.
The same applies to the
Black Sea countries that,
combined, are now the
world’s largest exporters of
wheat. The weakness in the
Russian ruble and Ukrainian
hryvnia means they’re also
partly isolated from lower US-
denominated prices, allowing
them to be even more
competitive. The US and
Canada combined are now at
a record-low 26% of the world
wheat market.
If you’re looking for hope
on the demand side, it might
be awhile. In his presentation,
Dan Basse of AgResources
noted that not only has
biofuels demand plateaued,
so has the sharp rise in per
capita calorie consumption in
Asia. He forecast that world
per capita consumption will
only increase modestly, partly
because an aging population
doesn’t eat as much,
especially meat. As for the
ever-increasing world
population that we hear so
much about needing to feed,
Basse noted that it’s actually
expected to drop in Russia,
Europe and Japan, which
have been among the larger
per capita consumers until
now.
China has recently been a
major driver of import
demand but a recurring
theme at last fall’s conference
was just how large China’s
corn stockpile has become.
This is a government-held
reserve that must be released
for sale when the stocks are
three years old. The USDA
puts the stockpile at 90
million tonnes but trade
estimates range as high as 200
million. Either way, China’s
feed grain imports are likely to
slow dramatically.
El Niño and La Niña
If you’re rather uncharitably
hoping that a crop shortfall
(somewhere else, of course)
will turn things around, you
may have to wait awhile. El
Niño has been getting plenty
of headlines recently, but
weather specialists at the
conference were mixed on
whether it would have much
eect, except possibly in the
Black Sea region. There was
more consensus that a switch
to a La Niña phase later this
year might cause more crop
problems.
Blip and a bull
But with so much
production now spread into
newer regions such as the
Black Sea and South America,
total world production is now
more stable, and made even
more so by the increasingly
widespread adoption of
modern farming practices.
Just as in the past, sooner or
later there will be another
production blip and another
bull market. But the evidence
is that the blip will be smaller
and the bull market will be
shorter.
Farmers have been
responding for all those calls
to feed the world. Once again,
they’re not being rewarded
for their eort.
John Morriss
is associate publisher
of Manitoba Co-operator.
Viewpoint
JOHN MORRISS
Boom or bust: either way farmers get the shaft
Total world grain production well distributed and more stable
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 5
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC 7
The Pacic Agriculture Show at Abbotsford Tradex is expanding again this year, with nearly 300
exhibitors and a fully packed agenda of producer meetings and workshops. (File photo)
by DAVID SCHMIDT
ABBOTSFORD BC’s biggest
agriculture show of the year is
returning to the Tradex in
Abbotsford, January 28-30.
Now in its 18th year, the
Pacic Agriculture Show
annually attracts over 7,000
people, including about 2,000
farmers who come for
information on a wide variety
of subjects and for the chance
to meet friends and view
hundreds of farm-related
exhibits.
“We have close to 300
exhibitors this year,” says PAS
trade show co-ordinator Jim
Shepard.
The number and variety of
exhibitors continues to
increase. When larger exhibits
leave, they are replaced by
multiple smaller exhibits.
Some of the larger exhibits are
shrinking their indoor exhibit
space by displaying their
equipment outside. There
were about 80 pieces of
equipment outside last year
and Shepard expects at least
that many this year.
“As equipment sizes
increase, there isn’t room for
them inside,” he notes.
Two tents provide
additional covered space. The
MNP Pavilion at the south end
of Wing 2 will be home of the
growers’ luncheon, Petting
Zoo and Farm Museum, and
the site of Thursday
afternoon’s opening
reception. The Scotiabank
Pavilion on the east side will
be used for the dairy lunch on
Thursday, a new products and
ideas showcase on Friday and
the BC Dairy Association’s
Mobile Dairy Classroom on
Saturday.
Trade show entry is
included with registrations for
the Horticulture Short Course,
BC Dairy Expo or Agricultural
and Municipal Biogas Forum.
Persons wishing to visit the
trade show only can buy
tickets at the door for $14 for
adults, $10 for seniors and
4-H’ers. Children under 14 are
admitted free. Trade show
admission is good for multiple
entries all three days.
Parking is free all three days,
thanks to the support of
Kubota, which will also be
oering a “ride and drive”
demo of selected equipment
on Thursday.
BC Agri-Food Gala
As usual, the BC Agriculture
Industry Gala at the Ramada
Plaza in Abbotsford,
Wednesday, January 27, will
precede the Pacic Agriculture
Show.
The Gala is a “celebration”
of agriculture’s
achievements in the past
year and the people who
have made it happen, says
BC Agriculture Council
executive director Reg Ens.
“The Gala acknowledges
industry leaders,” he says.
As such, it will be used to
present the BCAC Leadership
Award and a new farm safety
award from AgSafe.
Agriculture In the Classroom
will also recount its successes
in the past year while the
Outstanding Young Farmer
program will present its 2016
winner.
There were still seats
available in early December
but Ens says they are going
quickly.”We sell out every
year.”
For tickets, call BCAC at
866-522-3447 or visit:
[www.bcac.bc.ca].
BC Dairy Expo
The BC Dairy Expo also
begins the day before the
Trade show ups
exhibits, variety
for its18th event
agriculture show with the
popular annual Dairy Farm Self
Tour, January 27.
The two farms likely to
attract the most interest are
Gracemar Farms in Chilliwack
and Bileena Holsteins in
Agassiz. At Gracemar, farmers
will be able to see a robotic
rotary milking parlour.
Installed by Pacic Dairy
Centre, the 60-stall GEA
DairyProQ parlour is the rst of
its kind in North America. At
Bileena, Pacic Dairy installed
BC’s rst GEA MI-one double
box robotic milking system.
Unlike other robotic milkers,
the MI-one uses a one-stop
attachment to prepare,
stimulate and milk the udder.
The system also includes GEA’s
CowScout herd health and
activity monitoring system.
Please see “PACIFIC” page 8
Thank you to the 2016 Biogas Forum sponsors:
Registration only $20
before January 11th for
Farmers & Students
The Biogas Forum is proudly
presented by ARDCorp &
Canadian Biogas Association
To sign-up or for more details about the
2016 Biogas Forum, please visit
www.agricultureshow.net/agri-energy-forum
2016 Agricultural & Municipal Biogas Forum:
Closing the Loop
January 28th - 29th, 2016 at
Tradex, Abbotsford
Learn about biogas, potential
nutrient value, and the
opportunity to produce
fuel for machinery
2016 Agricultural & Municipal Biogas Forum:
Closing the Loop
PACIFIC AGRICULTURE SHOW PREVIEW
BC Agri-Food Gala
BC Dairy Expo
Country Life in BC • January 20168
Four other farms complete
the 2016 tour. In Abbotsford,
Whatcom Acres Farm will be
demonstrating its new Lely
Vector automatic feeding
system while Crossroads Dairy
Farm will tour people through
its new 40-stall DeLaval
internal rotary herringbone
parlour in the morning only.
Dale Jerseys in Mission will
show o its new drive-through
barn complete with two
DeLaval robotic milkers, an
animal-friendly Surebond Safe
Floor and Artex comfort stalls
with Gel Mats. Sand bedding
and three Lely Astronaut
robotic milkers are highlights
of the new barn and milking
facilities at West River Farm in
Rosedale.
Farmers should pick up a
tour guide from the BC
Ministry of Agriculture or dairy
equipment suppliers for
directions and each farm’s
visiting hours. Complimentary
lunches will be available at
Gracemar Farms and Dale
Jerseys.
Because robotic technology
requires dierent
management approaches, the
BC Dairy Expo at the PAS
Thursday morning will feature
Dr. Jerey Bewley of the
University of Kentucky
Department of Animal and
Food Sciences. He will discuss
the economics and
implementation of precision
dairy technologies for mastitis
prevention, cow comfort and
lameness prevention.
Following Bewley,
University of BC Faculty of
Land and Food Systems
assistant professor of animal
reproduction Dr. Ronaldo Cerri
will describe his research into
strategies to overcome sub-
fertility in dairy cows, such as
the use of automated
methods to detect estrus,
ovulation time and health
disorders.
The morning will conclude
with a 30-minute presentation
on Dairy Farmers of Canada’s
proAction Initiative.
Interested farmers can
register at the door Thursday
morning. Cost of the sessions
is $20 and includes the
Scotiabank BBQ lunch at noon
and a three-day pass to the
trade show.
Biogas Forum
Since its addition to the
Pacic Agriculture Show
program six years ago, the
Pacic Agri-Energy Forum has
been encouraging the
adoption of new technologies
to create value out of farm
waste by producing biogas
and other types of energy on-
farm.
This year the forum is not
only “closing the loop” but
adjusting its focus to include
both agricultural and
municipal biogas production.
The forum begins Thursday
afternoon with an update on
the state of on-farm biogas in
both Canada and the US. It will
be followed by a discussion of
nutrient management issues
associated with biogas
technologies. Farmers who
learned about and toured the
anaerobic digester at
Seabreeze Farms in Delta
during last year’s forum should
be interested in an update on
the Trident Nutrient Recovery
System, now that it has been
operating for a year. They will
also get initial results of eld
application trials for digestate.
Friday morning will be of
more interest to municipal
ocials as it discusses
municipal biogas projects in
both BC and Sweden. Friday
afternoon will look at the use
of biogas as a renewable
natural gas vehicle fuel.
Farmers wishing to attend
just the Thursday afternoon
session can do so for $20 if
they register by January 12.
Registration for the entire
forum is $65 before January 12
and $95 thereafter. Register at
[www.agricultureshow.net].
Agriculture
For the last two years,
Kwantlen Polytechnic
University Institute for
Sustainable Food Systems has
been presenting some very
popular small farm sessions at
the Pacic Agriculture Show
on Saturday.
This year, KPU and the
University of the Fraser Valley
are combining forces to look
at urban agriculture, Saturday
morning. Participants will learn
what urban agriculture is and
hear from several people who
are already engaged in this
emerging eld.
In the afternoon, Tom
Baumann of UFV will chair a
symposium on hop
production and processing, a
crop which shows a lot of
promise given the increasing
consumer interest in and
demand craft breweries.
Horticulture Short Course
The Horticulture Growers
Short Course began as a short
course for strawberry and
raspberry growers over six
decades ago and berries are
still the backbone of the
program. Thursday’s sessions
are aimed at strawberry and
raspberry growers while
Saturday’s sessions focus on
blueberries. Growers will learn
about disease and pest
management, mulches, soil
fumigation, new varieties and
market outlooks. Highlighted
speakers include David
Gombas of the United Fresh
Produce Association, Martine
Dorais, the most recent
addition to the research sta
at the Agassiz Research &
Development Centre, Lisa
Wasko DeVetter of
Washington State University
Department of Horticulture,
and berry breeders from BC,
Washington and Oregon.
Friday afternoon all
growers will get the latest
information on SWD
monitoring and management
and the impact of the new
Water Sustainability Act.
University of California
strawberry and caneberry
specialist Mark Bolda will
detail strategies to manage
lygus bugs and stink bugs
and present the latest
research on soil fumigation
options.
Friday morning’s sessions
are all about improving farm
business management. In the
Terralink Room, three experts
from the US and the
Netherlands will describe the
use of robotics, also known as
precision agriculture, in
agricultural production and
provide their insights into how
it will impact how farms
operate in the future.
“Come prepared or send in
advance the challenges your
farm faces and let’s discuss
ways to continue on the path
to precision and data decision
farming,” says keynote speaker
Lisa Prassack, a Colorado agri-
food innovation expert and
data strategy consultant.
The new Water
Sustainability Act, now coming
into eect, will have a huge
impact on farming in the
future. Friday morning in the
Direct Solutions Room,
growers will learn how the act
diers from the old Water Act
and what provincial resources
are available to manage water
on the farm, particularly in
light of a changing climate.
Of course, you have to
make money to farm, and
that’s not always easy. To help
you manage the nancial risks,
senior MNP sta will present a
two-hour symposium on
managing risk and uncertainty,
including the use of
AgriStability and private sector
risk management tools, Friday
morning in the BASF Gallery.
Potatoes & Field Vegetables
What are the most
promising new potato
varieties? How do you manage
trips and wireworms in
potatoes? How can you use
biotic inputs to manage soils
for growing potatoes? These
are the questions to be
answered at the potato
session in the BASF Gallery
Thursday morning. Speakers
include Colorado potato
Please see “PACIFIC” page 9
PACIFIC AGRICULTURE SHOW PREVIEW
Biogas Forum
Urban & Specialty Ag
Horticulture Short Course
Business Management
Potatoes & Field Vegetables
Proudly certifying
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FVOPA provides year round certification
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC 9
grower Brendon Rockey,
Heather Meberg and Kiara Jack
of ES Cropconsult and Agassiz
Research and Development
Centre scientists Bob Vernon
and Wim Van Herk.
Vernon will be back in the
BASF Gallery Thursday
afternoon to oer advice on
managing cabbage root
maggots in brassica crops. The
afternoon will also include
help in managing weeds in
eld vegetables and a panel
discussion on managing
powdery mildew in cucurbits.
The BASF Gallery will have
more information for eld
vegetable growers Friday
afternoon. Topics include okra,
table beets and sweet
potatoes. BCMA eld
vegetable specialist Susan
Smith and Renee Prasad of the
University of the Fraser Valley
will also provide highlights of
the 2016 BC Field Vegetable
Production Guide.
Greenhouse Vegetables
Want to add a new crop to
your greenhouse? How about
Chinese /Indian eggplant or
strawberries? Learn about
these opportunities from
Villam Zvallo of the Vineland
Research & Innovation Centre
and Chieri Kubota of the
University of Arizona, Thursday
morning in the Direct
Solutions Room. Greenhouse
growers will also learn about
the impacts of production
practices on fruit quality, the
use of chlorine dioxide to
disinfect irrigation water and a
new ventilated latent heat
converter for greenhouse
dehumidication.
Floriculture
Thursday afternoon in the
Direct Solutions Room,
researchers and extension
workers from Ontario,
California and the Netherlands
will discuss topics of interest to
oriculture growers. They will
oer helpful tips on the use of
biocontrols, insecticide
rotation, height control of
oriculture crops and discuss
the latest robotic systems
available to growers.
Organic Production
What products are available
for organic growers and how
can they best be used? Which
vegetable varieties are best for
organic production in the
Fraser Valley? How is
commercial compost made?
Those are just some of the
questions to be answered at
the organic sessions in the
BASF Gallery. The full day of
presentations will conclude
with an update on the Canada
Organic Standards and
The backbone of the Pacic Agriculture Show is its producer presentations on everything from energy
to crop production. (File photo)
Permitted Substances List.
Hazelnuts
For the third year in a row,
the BC Hazelnut Growers
Association will be holding its
annual meeting at the Pacic
Agriculture Show. The annual
meeting will be held Saturday
afternoon in the Direct
Solutions Room and include
the latest data from the
ongoing BC trial of new EFB-
resistant cultivars as well as
information on yields and
markets for the new variety
from Larry George of Oregon’s
George Packing Company.
Farm Direct Marketing
Ronda Payne has
presented stories about
farm direct marketers in
Country Life in BC and other
publications and on the
web for years. Friday
afternoon in the Direct
Solutions Room, she will
engage local direct
marketers in an interactive
discussion of how to grow
their business by simply
telling their story.
That is not the only way to
promote a farm direct
marketing business. Oering
additional insights will be
North American Farm Direct
Marketing Association
executive director Charlie
Touchette, one the most
widely sought-after speakers
on direct marketing.
To complete the
afternoon, Patrick Murphy
of Vista D’Oro Farms and
Winery will describe his
progression from selling
on-farm and at local
farmers markets to being
retailed in London’s
prestigious Harrods
department store.
Registration
Growers who register for
the Horticulture Growers
Short Course by January 11
pay only $80 for the first
representative and $80 for
all other representatives
from the same farm.
After January 11, all
registration fees increase to
$120. Lunch tickets are
available at $19 each when
you preregister or for $23 at
the door. Selected sessions
qualify for credits in the
Pesticide Applicators License
Re-certification Program.
Participants can register
online or download a
registration form at
[www.agricultureshow.net].
Greenhouse Vegetables
PACIFIC AGRICULTURE SHOW PREVIEW
Floriculture
Organic Production
Hazelnuts
Farm Direct Marketing
Registration
Matsqui
Ag-Repair
Abbotsford, BC
604-826-3281
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC
Country Life in BC • January 201612
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VANCOUVER
When BC
Dairy Association president
Dave Taylor of Viewfield
Farms in Courtenay talks
about good animal care and
top quality milk, it’s more
than just talk. At the BCDA
annual meeting in Vancouver,
November 27, Taylor was
given the second-annual BC
Milk Quality Award for the
best milk in the province last
year. Earning second place
honours was another
Vancouver Island dairyman,
Fred Wikkerink of Wikksview
Farms in Cobble Hill.
To qualify for the award, a
producer must have the
lowest average somatic cell
count and bacterial plate
count for the dairy year with
no infractions for antibiotics
or other impurities in the
milk.
Good animal care and
quality milk are two
cornerstones of Dairy
Farmers of Canada proAction
Initiative (PAI) which is now
being rolled out across the
country.
Animal care
New BC PAI co-ordinator
Elizabeth Schouten told
producers the milk quality
components are now fully
implemented even though
six BC milk producers are still
not registered for the
Canadian Quality Milk
program. The BC Milk
Marketing Board made
animal care mandatory in
September but Schouten
notes it will take two years to
validate all producers.
Validations before September
2016 will not include all
components of the program,
as Holstein Canada classifiers
will not begin performing
technical assessments until
then.
With the first three PAI
components now in place,
trials are beginning on
traceability and biosecurity.
Traceability means being
able to track a live animal
from the farm of origin to the
slaughterhouse, explains DFC
national traceability co-
ordinator Melissa Lalonde. It
includes premises ID, animal
ID and movement tracking.
“ID is the glue that holds all
the proAction parts
together,” she told producers.
A decade ago, traceability
was promoted to manage
disease outbreaks like hoof
and mouth or BSE and has
proved its value in avian
influenza outbreaks. Today,
however, it has a more critical
Animal welfare, milk quality cornerstones of BC dairy industry
He walks the talk. BC Dairy Association president Dave Taylor, left, of Vieweld Farms in Courtenay
(rst) and Fred Wikkerink of Wikksview Farm in Cobble Hill (second) received the 2015 BC Milk Quality
Awards from BC Milk Marketing Board chair Jim Byrne, at right, during the BC Dairy Conference in
Vancouver. (David Schmidt photo)
role to answer consumer
concerns about where their
food comes from.
All cattle premises,
including auction marts, must
have a unique premise ID and
each animal is expected to
have a tag in each ear.
Producers should tag a calf
between one to ten days of
age and activate the tag
within seven days. Animal
movements must be
recorded the day they occur
and tags retired within seven
days of an animal’s death.
Two years to practice”
Lalonde said producers
have the next two years to
“practice” before traceability
becomes mandatory.
Traceability is critical to
effective biosecurity, says
Josh Waddington of
Greenbelt Veterinary Services
in Chilliwack. Although it has
not been a high priority for
many dairy farmers, he says
that needs to change.
“There are consequences
for not doing biosecurity,”
Waddington said.
DFC’s draft biosecurity
program sets out mandatory
minimum requirements and
includes a two-page
questionnaire to help farmers
assess their biosecurity risks
and responses.
He calls the people picking
up deadstock a farm’s
biggest biosecurity risk.
“You need to develop
standard operating protocols
for such things as
vaccinations and vehicle
movements,” he said.
Elizabeth Schouten
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 13
BC Holstein Branch AGM recognizes Ben Cuthbert for service
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VANCOUVER Ben Cuthbert of
Silvermaple Farms in Ladysmith is
best known in the dairy industry for
his years as a BC Milk Marketing Board
director. For the past year, he has
served as BC’s director of Holstein
Canada. But he is also a good cowman
and the BC Holstein Branch
recognized that at their annual
meeting in Vancouver, November 25.
Cuthbert was presented with BC
Holstein’s prestigious 2015 cow of the
year award for Silvermaple Damion
Camomile. Now owned by Butlerview
Farm of Illinois, Camomile was the
reserve grand champion of the World
Dairy Expo in 2011 and twice named
an All-Canadian and All-American
cow.
“It’s great to have bred a cow like
that,” Cuthbert said, singling out
Stanhope-Wedgwood for “getting this
cow to the pinnacle” of the Holstein
show world.
Shows in decline
The number of shows, however,
continues to decline. Although BC
Holstein and Westcoast Holsteins
partnered to present a successful BC
Spring Show and Sale in March, the
Central Fraser Valley club’s fall show
was cancelled in 2015 due to low
entry numbers.
“Hopefully, there will be a fall show
next year,” BCH show committee chair
Matt Langelaan said.
Cuthbert was not the only Holstein
breeder the AGM recognized. The
branch also conferred honourary
memberships on Harry Bailey and
John Blair.
Regular attendee
A member of Holstein Canada for
over 60 years, Bailey has been a
regular attendee at the Royal Winter
Fair in Toronto, often leading top BC
show cattle. He was the rst president
of the Upper Fraser Valley Holstein
Club, BC Holstein president in 1971-
72, and BC Holstein secretary-
eldman in 1977-78. He also made his
mark as an exporter of BC Holstein
genetics to Japan and other foreign
markets.
Although his comment was not
specically directed at Bailey, HC
second vice president Orville Schmidt
acknowledged his contribution,
noting “it’s a feather in (BC’s) hat to
get the respect for your cattle that
you do in Japan.”
Blair served on the BC Holstein
board for almost 30 years, acting as
president in 1987-88. He also
represented BC at Holstein Canada for
almost a decade, serving as HC
president in 2003-14. He began his
show career as a 4-H’er, earning the
4-H grand championship at the PNE in
1959. His commitment to youth led
Long-time dairymen Harry Bailey and John Blair conferred honourary memberships
Holstein
Canada BC
director Ben
Cuthbert, at
right, of
Silvermaple
Farms in
Ladysmith
receives the
award for the
2015 BC
Holstein Cow
of the Year,
Silvermaple
Damion
Camomile,
from BC
Holsteins
director Brian
Hamming.
(David Schmidt
photo)
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Agriculture is our way of life too
him to become one of the
founders of the Western
Canadian Classic (WCC) show
in the early 1980’s.
Money invested in WCC
and other initiatives for youth
“is never a waste,” BCH
president Kevin Antonsen
said. In 2015, the branch
helped BC youth attend the
WCC in Alberta, sponsored
three young adults at the
Holstein Canada Young
Leaders Program in New
Brunswick and sent two
others to the Manitoba Dairy
$en$e Workshop.
Holstein registrations
HC chief executive ocer
Ann Louise Carson said BC is
leading the way in
registrations and
classications with Holstein
Canada. In 2015, BC Holstein
registrations were up 9% and
classications up a whopping
25%. She told local breeders
HC will only take registrations
online after moving to its new
herdbook software at the end
of January. That won’t aect
many breeders as only 5% of
BC registrations are still being
done on paper. Almost half
are now being done by
Canwest DHI.
Canwest DHI marketing
and eld services manager
Richard Cantin noted 63% of
BC dairy herds are now on
DHI, the highest percentage
in ve years. That includes 35
herds using robotic milkers.
He also complimented BC
breeders on the health of
their animals. In the rst three
weeks DHI tested for sub
clinical ketosis, they found
only 15% positive tests. In the
next three weeks, that
dropped to 8%, the lowest
percentage in Canada and
well below the predicted 25%
positive.
BC LEADING IN REGISTRATIONS From page 13
Harry Bailey, left, and John
Blair, centre, were named the
2015 honorary members of the
BC Holstein Branch. Making the
presentation was branch
president Kevin Antonsen.
(David Schmidt photo)
Honoured
Former Island Farms president John Pendray, left, received
the BC Dairy Industry Achievement Award from Gerry Adams
of the BC Dairy Historical Society during the BC Dairy
Conference banquet. (David Schmidt photo)
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 15
by PETER MITHAM
GUELPH, ON – California’s
drought seems set to run for a
fth year, but University of
Guelph analysts suggest it
won’t be the key cause of food
price ination in 2015.
While this winter’s El Niño
weather pattern promises
precipitation to California’s
parched farmland, with early
signs pointing to a wetter
winter than last year amid the
deepest drought in 120 years,
water experts in Davis,
California report that this
winter’s precipitation “may
rell California’s drought-
diminished reservoirs, but it
won’t do much to restock the
severely depleted aquifers.”
Snowpack in the Sierra
Nevada, which supplies
valuable runo to irrigation
networks, was looking good
but the US Drought Monitor
noted in early November that
“given the long-term nature of
the drought in much of the Far
West, only scattered areas of
improvement were noted.”
The University of Guelph’s
Food Institute believes that
wetter conditions could lead
to increased production in
some parts of California, which
could keep prices in check.
“Production capacity could
be less of a concern and
would increase product
exports, particularly in
Canada,” the report led by
Sylvain Charlebois observes.
“Vegetable and fruit prices
could be aected as a result,
making procurement easier for
importers.”
But for consumers, those
increased imports will come at
a price, thanks to exchange
rates that have made items
sold in US dollars more
expensive.
Canada’s dollar was
plumbing 12-year lows in mid-
December, buying just 73 US
cents. This is a far cry from
February 2013, the last time
the two currencies were at
parity.
Charlebois and his
colleagues believe the dollar
could drop yet further in 2016,
plunging through 70 US cents
and pushing grocery prices
higher.
Consumers will cope
“For every cent drop in the
dollar over a short period of
time, currency-exposed food
categories like vegetables,
fruits and nuts are likely to
increase by more than 1%,”
the report states. “Many
vegetables, fruits, processed
and grocery products are likely
to continue to increase in
2016. Unlike meats, it is more
challenging to nd substitutes
for these products, so
consumers cope with higher
prices.”
Guelph’s Food Institute
expect food prices could rise
2% to 4% in 2016. This is
consistent with a reported
increase of 4.1% in grocery
prices in 2015, described as
“signicantly above ination.”
It’s also above the anticipated
Sagging dollar trumps drought in food price rise
gain of between 0.7% and 3%.
“This means the average
Canadian household likely
paid about $325 more for food
in 2015,” the report states,
before going on to note that
spending will continue to
increase in 2016, thanks
almost exclusively to
exchange rates.
“Our forecast predicts the
average household could
spend up to $345 more on
food in 2016,” it says.
The relative impact of
drought and the dollar is seen
in the forecast for vegetables,
which were expected to
increase 5.5% to 7.5% in 2015,
but in fact rose 10.1%. The
forecast for 2016 calls for an
increase of just 2% to 4%,
thanks to diminished drought
impacts and better hedging
practices.
Similarly, prices for fruit and
nuts leapt 9.1% in 2015, but
the forecast for 2016 is a shade
lower than last year’s forecast
at 2.5% to 4.5%.
Chances are consumers will
take the increases in stride,
however. While they may
mean pain for lower income
families, gains in average
household income are likely to
dull the impact.
Indeed, Food Freedom Day
– when the Canadian
Federation of Agriculture
reminds the country of just
how cheap food in Canada is –
is tentatively set for February
3, 2016. That’s three days
earlier than last year, a sign
that Canadians continue to
pay a diminishing share of
their earnings to be fed well.
A depreciating loonie is going to hurt Canadian consumers at the grocery checkout. (File photo)
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by MARGARET EVANS
EDMONTON – A
controversial bill that Alberta’s
NDP government says will
ensure its 60,000 farm and
ranch workers will have the
same basic protections that
other workers in the province
– and across Canada – have
received for decades passed
third and nal reading on
December 10, in spite of
public demonstrations against
the legislation.
The original purpose of Bill
6, the Enhanced Protection for
Farm and Ranch Workers Act,
was to ensure farms and
ranches would be subjected to
Occupational Health and
Safety legislation to prevent
farm and ranch incidents that
can result in injury or death; it
provides Workers’
Compensation Board
insurance coverage to support
workers injured on the job,
and farms and ranches would
be included in the
Employment Standards and
Labour Regulations legislation
allowing investigators to
review an injury, accident or
death related to the
commercial operation.
“Everyone deserves a safe,
fair and healthy workplace,”
said Lori Sigurdson, Minister of
Jobs, Skills, Training and
Labour. “With this Bill,
workplace legislation will now
extend to farms and ranches.
The rules we implement must
respect the unique qualities of
the farm and ranch industry,
and I look forward to working
with industry members to
develop rules that make
sense.”
The trouble is, what the Bill
is delivering isn’t what family
farms and ranches want. When
the Bill was rst oated,
contradictions misinformed
the agricultural community.
Information from WCB
contradicted the
government’s position on
mandatory coverage that
included children working on
family farms.
Traditionally, children,
neighbours and friends have
always pitched in to help at
heavy load times like calving,
haying and harvest. But under
the original text of Bill 6, WCB
coverage would be
mandatory.
The threat to the unique
operation of family farms
erupted in anger at many
town hall meetings and the
NDP government was forced
to clarify the intent and
meaning of Bill 6 with
amendments. According to
Alberta Agriculture website,
the proposed amendments
would:
• make clear WCB coverage
would be required only for
paid employees, with an
option for farmers to extend
coverage to unpaid workers
like family members,
neighbours and friends;
• make clear that Occupational
Health and Safety standards
apply when a farm employs
one or more paid employees
at any time of the year.
Farm and ranch workers will
be protected by the
Occupational Health and
Safety Act with regulations
beginning January 1, 2016.
Workers’ Compensation Board
coverage for employed farm
and ranch workers will also be
mandatory as of that date.
Changes to Alberta’s
Employment Standards and
Labour Relations legislation
will come into eect in the
spring of 2016, following
consultations with industry
regarding exemptions that
may be needed for unique
circumstances such as seeding
or harvesting. But the
government will continue to
work with the industry over
the next year to develop
detailed occupational health
and safety technical rules for
farms and ranches. Those rules
are expected to be in place in
2017.
What matters is that the
unique workplace
characteristics of farms and
ranches are recognized. At the
time of writing (mid-
December), further
amendments to the Bill are
Angst on the farm in Alberta
Controversial bill that endeavours to provide farm
workers with more protection under increasing fire
expected.
“No one has condence in
the NDP,” says Gary
Westergaard of GW Equine
Services in Sherwood Park.
“Agriculture is very diverse.
There are grain growers,
feedlots, cattle, horses. But
they just want to pass (the Bill)
as a blanket policy. It’s got the
whole province riled up. An
amendment doesn’t cut it.
People want it stopped.”
There was so much anger
among the farming community
that a convoy of trucks, semi-
trailers, tractors, ranchers on
horseback and a smorgasbord
of specialized agricultural
equipment made its way to
Okotoks in early December to a
townhall-style forum. Hundreds
of protesters have shown up at
the legislature to tell the
government to slow or kill the
bill.
“We appreciate the
concerns farmers and ranchers
have raised,” says Oneil Carlier,
Alberta’s Minister of
Agriculture and Forestry. “To
be clear, Bill 6 is not in any way
going to aect children doing
their chores, participating in 4-
H or learning the family
business. It does not prevent
neighbours, relatives and
friends from helping each
other out during busy times. It
does not apply to recreational
activities such as riding horses
or hunting on farmland.
“What Bill 6 does is bring
Alberta farm and ranch safety
standards in line with other
provinces and ensure that if a
wage-earning employee is
injured or killed on the job,
that person and their family
have the same access to
nancial supports as
employees in other sectors.”
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Photo courtesy of CBC
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 17
by RONDA PAYNE
WHONNOCK – Perhaps the
new alternative crop in BC is
one that’s been around for
years – if only in the
underground economy.
Unfortunately, water concerns
keep Whonnock residents
from welcoming the new pot-
growing Tantalus Labs with
open arms.
The fact that Tantalus is a
legal medical marijuana
producer isn’t the concern of
residents in the east Maple
Ridge community; it’s their
sensitive Grant Hill aquifer that
has turned them against the
operation.
Birgit Mischke, a resident
near the project, says the fact
the operation is growing pot is
irrelevant to the area residents.
“Our concern is the water,”
she notes. “Even if he would
grow lettuce, or tomatoes, or
cucumbers, or dandelions or
daisies.”
The Grant Hill aquifer has
been an issue for a number of
years. Residents like Mischke,
Mitch Jensen and former MLA
Dennis Streifel all say that
summers are particularly
dicult for Whonnock
residents as many wells run
dry. Some residents haul water
to their properties each
summer.
Dan Sutton, managing
director with Tantalus Labs,
has taken steps to address
resident concerns.
“Tantalus Labs believes our
material investment in water
management strategies should
allay rational concern,” Sutton
says. “Tantalus Labs has
voluntarily commissioned the
services of an independent
third party hydrological
engineer. This engineer has
stated in writing and in the
public domain that as long as
the well is operated as per our
building permit application
that ‘[the engineers] do not
anticipate any impacts to the
source aquifer or adjacent
wells’.”
The hydrological report
does not allay resident fears of
increasing water shortages,
however.
“He can potentially aect
any well in the area,” Mischke
says. “There’s not enough
water here for the residents.”
When complete, Tantalus’s
operation will be an 115,000
square foot greenhouse facility
designed to grow cannabis
with the aid of the sun.
Sutton notes the traditional
basement or warehouse
grower has far less eciency,
especially when it comes to
natural resource inputs. Sutton
believes Tantalus can build
software to create more
ecient data management to
better manipulate the
environment in the
greenhouse to improve
productivity.
“They are paying about 20
times as much in electricity to
give the plant less ecient
light quality,” he says, “so in a
greenhouse, we will take
sunlight and combine it with
the environmental control. The
electricity savings show up not
only in the carbon savings, but
also on the balance sheet.”
Despite this, residents in 64
homes within 500 meters of
the Tantalus facility have the
potential to be impacted
negatively, according to
Jensen. He has the greatest
understanding among
residents when it comes to the
aquifer as he and wife Silvie
have done research on local
aquifers, particularly the Grant
Hill one, for a number of years.
It has unique challenges,
dierent from other aquifers
and has been labelled as
vulnerable by the Ministry of
Forests, Lands and Natural
Resources.
“Mr. Sutton should have
done his homework prior to
locating in an area that is
locally known for its water
shortages,” says Jensen. “There
are no industrial scale farming
activities in Whonnock for a
Whonnock residents believe aquifer at risk with large-scale pot grower
Whonnock residents have been protesting the construction of a new greenhouse to grow medical
marijuana – but it’s not the nature of the crop that has them up in arms. They say the area’s aquifer is
already inadequate to service existing residences and farms and they’re convinced the greenhouse
operation will lead to further water shortages. (Jo Sleigh le photo)
Professional
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reason.”
Sutton notes the site was
chosen because “the District of
Maple Ridge has been more
amenable to agricultural
cannabis operations than
other regions.”
It is not known if Sutton was
aware of the community’s
ongoing water problems at
the time Tantalus purchased
the site, which is in the
agricultural land reserve.
“We have invested
approximately $500,000 in a
close to 5,000 cubic meter
reservoir to house rainwater
recaptured from our roof,”
Sutton says. “We estimate that
about 90% of our water needs
will be accommodated by this
system.”
Streifel and Jensen both
note that the rainwater Sutton
captures will reduce the water
returned to the aquifer.
“Rain harvesting has come
up within [Sutton’s] program
stream a few times now, with
little account that even using
that water commodity then
Please see “PROTEST” page 18
Dustin
Stadnyk
CPA, CA
Chris
Henderson
BBA, CPA, CA
Nathalie
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Country Life in BC • January 201618
PROTEST From page 17
by DAVID SCHMIDT
VANCOUVER For dairy
farmers, bigger is better – if
you can aord it.
“Bigger has benets but
you have to do it smart,”
KPMG partner David Guthrie
of Chilliwack told producers at
the BC Dairy Conference in
Vancouver, November 26.
“An increased herd size
increases the production
margin but it also adds debt
load,” added KPMG senior
manager Matt Creechan.
Guthrie, Creechan and
KPMG senior principal David
Metzger presented initial
results of a benchmarking
study KPMG is conducting
with some of its dairy clients.
The study currently
includes 47 producers with
parlours and 17 producers
using robotic milkers
although Creechan says they
are open to having more
participants. Farms range in
size from as little as 40 kgs to
as much as 900 kgs of
continuous daily quota (CDQ),
with an average of 197.7 kgs
of CDQ.
Creechan says feed, labour
and production expenses eat
up 62% of farm revenues,
leaving only 38% to cover
management wages,
amortization, debt servicing,
taxes and prot.
Feed costs up
When feed costs shot up a
couple of years ago, the
amount of cash coming out of
the barn to those costs was
only $7.34 per kg shipped. As
producers changed their
management, that increased
to $8.77 per kg in 2015.
However, Creechan notes
producers also increased their
debt load during the same
period. Even though
producers received quota
increases of over 10% in the
past two years, their debt load
increased from $22,154 per kg
in 2013 to $23,186 per kg in
2015.
Given the above numbers,
KPMG calculates that adding
one kg of quota would add
$3,171 in annual cash
earnings.
“This would be the
expected cash available to
pay for the nancing of that
kilogram purchased,”
Creechan explains.
This would not cover
today’s cost of quota
amortized over 15 years at a
3.5% interest rate although
farmers may be able to
leverage the purchase using
their existing cash ow and/or
assets, such as their land base.
“You need to manage cash
ow and pay attention to
debt servicing costs,” Guthrie
reminded producers.
As if that is not enough to
think about, Metzger advises
producers to also think about
their corporate structure. He
notes there are tax
advantages to incorporation
since corporations which
qualify for small business tax
rates pay less than a third of
the marginal personal income
tax rate for people earning
over $100,000 per year.
However, he warned the
cost of land and quota may
disqualify some farmers from
the small business category.
“If your assets exceed $15
million, you’re a large
business,” he pointed out.
Benchmarking study weighs the pros and cons of dairy herd size
impedes the replenishing of
ground water sources that
would normally recharge
aquifers, creeks, rivers, etc. on
the broader scale,” says Jensen.
Last March, a community
forum was held. Maple Ridge
mayor Nicole Read explained it
was the biggest turnout she’d
seen at such an event.
“We had to open the back
doors and put tents up,” she
notes.
The forum was followed by
a rally in Whonnock in May.
While a great amount of
research has been done on
both sides, the reality of the
situation won’t be conrmed
until early 2016 when the
operation begins production
following completion of
construction and approval is
granted to Tantalus from
Health Canada.
Unfortunately, if water does
run short in Whonnock,
residents are uncertain if the
municipality will come to their
aid.
“[The municipality] had told
us water was not their
responsibility; it’s a provincial
responsibility,” says Mischke.
“We have to buy our water and
there’s community wells; that
we have to look after our own
problems.”
Read says the municipality
doesn’t regulate the aquifer
that it does fall under
provincial jurisdiction but
local government is
“encouraging and requiring
the provincial government to
exercise due diligence.”
“This is a very real concern
for Whonnock residents and
for the city,” Read notes. “The
city is investigating in terms of
monitoring what the province
is doing in order to protect
this.”
Matt Creechan
1.866.567.4162
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The HLA silage facer is designed to help you better manage
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC 19
by PETER MITHAM
OTTAWA
Canada’s beef
and pork producers scored a
major victory against the US as
this issue of Country Life in BC
went to press.
US lawmakers passed an
omnibus bill on December 18
that included a provision
repealing Country of Origin
Labeling (COOL) requirements
for pork and beef.
Canada’s long-standing
complaint against COOL was
decisively upheld by an
arbitrator with the World Trade
Organization (WTO) on
December 7, clearing the way
for retaliation in the form of
$1.1 billion a year worth of
taris against a number of
imports from the US.
“It’s time to put this behind
us,” said Chrystia Freeland,
Minister of International Trade,
in a conference call with media
on December 16.
Freeland and Minister of
Agriculture and Agrifood
Canada Lawrence MacAulay
were in Nairobi, Kenya,
attending World Trade
Organization meetings and
COOL was a hot topic with
their American counterparts.
Freeland said all parties were
sensitive to the need to restore
and maintain good trade
relations between the two
countries, but the decision
rested with lawmakers.
Freeland and MacAulay said
that nothing but the repeal of
COOL provisions for beef and
pork would prevent Canada
from proceeding with
retaliatory taris.
“It must be repealed or we
will retaliate,” MacAulay said.
US lawmakers’ decision to
repeal COOL in advance of
taris was welcomed in Ottawa
and Victoria, where BC
agriculture minister Norm
Letnick – who has largely let
his federal counterpart lead
the charge – issued a
statement praising the bill’s
passage.
“Throughout this long
process, the British Columbian
government has stood side-by-
side with BC cattlemen and the
Canadian government to do
our utmost to ensure BC food
products have fair access to US
markets, and that the terms
and spirit of all signed trade
US repeals COOL requirments for Canadian pork and beef
by PETER MITHAM
ABBOTSFORD – While the
human population of the
Lower Mainland is getting u
shots to protect against illness,
a duck shot with avian u is
conrming the poultry
industry’s decision to move to
a yellow alert level in
November to ward o the
threat of disease.
A wild duck downed by a
hunter in the last week of
November was found to be
carrying the H5N2 virus, a
highly infectious strain of a
virus that has devastated local
poultry ocks in the past.
A control zone was
established by the Canadian
Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
in December 2014 after ve
sites were investigated for the
virus.This year, Ray Nickel of
the BC Poultry Association
says the industry wanted to be
prepared for the disease and
upped its alert level to yellow
in mid November.
A yellow alert level requires
enforcement of the controlled
and restricted access zones on
the farm, a step above merely
identifying and monitoring
these areas. Specically, only
essential visitors are allowed
into areas with controlled
access, no contact with other
poultry operations are allowed,
and no mortalities are allowed
to leave the zone without CFIA
or veterinary approval.
Restricted access zones are
to be locked when authorized
personnel aren’t present, and
enhanced monitoring of ock
health is required.
Restricted access also limits
the potential for interaction
with wild bird material and the
risk of virus transmission.
These measures mean the
risk from the virus discovered
at the end of November is
limited because there’s little
chance the bird, its tissues or
feces and those of its fellows
would reach a commercial
poultry operation.
Poultry producers take flu precautions
www.kellou
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SEE US AT THE
AGRI-TRADE
Nov 7 - 10
See you at
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January 28-30
agreements are adhered to,”
he said.
While the US Cattlemen’s
Association had supported
COOL, the National
Cattlemen’s Beef Association
also cheered the policy’s
repeal, noting that it had cost
its members millions (primarily
in management costs) and the
country much goodwill in its
trading relationships.
COOL is only one of several
trade topics Freeland and
MacAulay were discussing with
counterparts at WTO meetings
in Nairobi last month.
There’s also signicant
interest in Canada’s approach
towards the Trans-Pacic
Partnership, negotiation of
which was completed days
before October’s federal
election.
A consultation process is
now underway, and
discussions with
representatives of the
agricultural sector are taking
place in Nairobi as part of
Prime Minister Trudeau’s
pledge to gather feedback on
the deal. MacAulay said
defense of supply
management remained
fundamental to the
government’s assessment with
respect to the deal’s impact on
the agriculture sector.
“Transparency and
consultation is very central to
our government,” Freeland
said. “We are very much in
listening mode.”
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NH FP230 W/ 27P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500
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USED TRACTORS
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JD 2355, O/S, 2WD, 3688 HRS, VERY NICE CONDITION #665780U1
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FELLA TH790 TEDDER, 25FT 6 ROTOR, MANUAL FOLD
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NH 658 RD BALER, 4 FT, TWINE ONLY #022207U1
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JD 567, MEGA WIDE PU, HIGH MOISTURE KIT, PUSH BAR, 540 PTO
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Have a Safe and Happy New Year!
Country Life in BC • January 201620
Sale expires
January 31, 2016
3032E TRACTOR
Retail: $34,282
Sale Price $ 28,529
SAVE UP TO $5753!
Plus Enjoy 0% for 60 Months
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC 21
Country Life in BC • January 201622
by DAVID SCHMIDT
OTTAWA Agriculture
didn’t even rate a passing
reference in the Liberal
government’s rst throne
speech December 4.
“That’s not a surprise,” says
BC Agriculture Council
executive director Reg Ens,
pointing out the urban-
centric party doesn’t have a
single Liberal MP from a rural
riding west of Ontario.
One of the shortest-ever
throne speeches, it reiterated
many of the promises the
Liberals made during the
election, including a more
open and transparent
government.
“In these chambers, the
voices of all Canadians
matter,” Governor General
David Johnston read.
Agriculture intends to put
that statement to the test.
“We know we have our
work cut out for us to make
sure we have our issues
heard,” Ens says, calling it a
positive sign that one of the
rst things Lawrence
MacAulay did after being
named Minister of Agriculture
and Agri-Food Canada was to
talk to the Canadian
Federation of Agriculture.
With no mention of
agriculture in the throne
speech, one has to read
MacAulay’s mandate letter for
an indication of where
government intends to go.
“Your overarching goal will
be to support the agricultural
sector in a way that allows it
to be a leader in job creation
and innovation (and) be more
innovative, safer, and
stronger,” Prime Minister
Justin Trudeau told MacAulay.
Priorities he set for the
ministry include:
• an Agri-Food Value Added
Investment Fund to provide
technical and marketing
assistance to help food
processors develop new
value-added products
• a food policy that puts more
healthy, high-quality food,
produced by Canadian
ranchers and farmers, on the
tables of families across the
country
• agricultural research to
support discovery science
and innovation, with
funding allocations to
involve producers
• a reassessment of the farm
income safety nets now in
place and development of a
new multi-year agricultural
policy framework to replace
Growing Forward 2 which
expires in 2018
• help agriculture adjust to
climate change and better
address water and soil
conservation and
development issues
• participate in a full review of
the Canadian grain
transportation system.
Agriculture snubbed in throne speech
by DAVID SCHMIDT
REGINA, SK
Okanagan
winemaking pioneer Anthony
von Mandl was one of ve
people inducted into the
Canadian Agricultural Hall of
Fame at an awards banquet
during the Canadian Western
Agribition, November 22.
Nominated by former BC
cabinet minister Wally Oppal,
von Mandl was recognized for
his eorts in putting the
Okanagan Valley on the
international wine map.
Von Mandl began his career
in the Canadian wine industry
in 1972 as an importer and
merchant of ne wines.
In 1981, he purchased the
near-bankrupt Golden Valley
Winery in West Kelowna, then
one of only ve
wineries then in the
Okanagan. He
renamed it Mission
Hill Family Estate
winery and turned
it into a world-class
destination winery,
thereby raising
international
awareness for agri-
tourism in this province.
Mission Hill soon gained
international recognition and
awards, including “Best
Chardonnay in the World” in
1994 and “World’s Best Pinot
Noir” in 2013. It was chosen as
“Canadian Winery of the Year”
six times from 2001 to 2013.
Today, VMF (von Mandl
Family) Estates owns four
wineries – Mission Hill, Cedar
Creek Estate
Winery, Martin’s
Lane and the new
CheckMate
Artisanal Winery,
and over 900 acres
of vineyards.
Von Mandl also
owns the Mark
Anthony Group
(wine merchants)
and is the founder of both
Mike’s Hard Lemonade and
the Turning Point Brewery.
Other 2015 inductees were
former Agriculture & Agri-
Food Canada wheat breeder
Ron DePauw of
Saskatchewan, former
Saskatchewan premier Grant
Devine and the late Edgar
Ward Jones, a founding father
of 4-H in Canada.
Von Mandl enters Canadian ag hall of fame
Anthony von Mandl
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Happy New Year!
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 23
by TOM WALKER
SALMO – Fresh from a successful
pilot project this past summer and
with a newly developed business plan,
the Kootenay and Boundary Food
Producers’ Co-op (KBFPC) is looking
forward to a successful 2016.
As their business plan outlines, the
co-op came about as a solution to a
problem and as an opportunity. The
problem is that farming and
secondary food processing in the West
Kootenays is not economically viable.
The opportunity? West Kootenay
residents spend $266 million a year on
food and 95% of that food is imported,
yet demand for local food is strong
and increasing, the plan notes, among
both consumers and wholesale
buyers.
What small farmers across the
Kootenay region lack is infrastructure
to organize, distribute, store and
market their produce.
Collaboration is the solution. A for-
prot co-op that operates a food hub,
KBFPC will allow farmers and
processors to scale up production to
be more nancially successful and
better meet the growing demand for
local food.
The farms are out there. The 2011
census for agriculture across the entire
Central Kootenay and Kootenay
Boundary Districts identied 728 farms
with nearly $48 million in gross farm
receipts. A survey by the West
Kootenay Permaculture Co-op
Association in 2014 found the vast
majority of farm incomes
were less than $30,000.
“The studies had all
been done,” says Kim
Charlesworth, who is a
member of KBFPC’s
steering committee. But
despite
recommendations for
building a regional food
system, ve reports from
the likes of the regional district and
Columbia Basin Trust sat on shelves.
A former Nelson city councillor and
self described “volunteer in food
activist circles,” Charlesworth says they
realized “if we wanted to build it, we
would have to do it ourselves.”
A feasibility study in 2014
supported by the BC Co-op
Association ”told us more or less what
we already knew,” says Charlesworth.
Keen producers
Phone surveys that were part of the
study were a beginning of relationship
building. The steering committee
went out to communities across the
region that fall. Meetings in Creston,
Argenta, Salmo and Nelson showed
positive support and a small number
of keen producers in the Salmo area
formed the initial working group.
“We brainstormed what kind of a
structure we wanted,” says
Charlesworth. “We decided on a for-
prot co-op.” Led by a six member
elected board of directors, the for-
prot model suits the entrepreneurial
objectives of the members.
Incorporation documents were drawn
up last winter with the assistance of
Zoe Creighton from the Upper
Columbia Co-operative Council.
“We had hoped to have our
business plan completed by the spring
(2015),” says Charlesworth. Despite
that, they developed a pilot project for
the 2015 summer that started in July
and ran for 14 weeks.
“We put together a market
brokerage and distribution service,”
explains Charlesworth. A part time co-
ordinator was hired to work with three
farmers. “We had four retail outlets,
one secondary producer and two
restaurants buying from us.”
The co-ordinator contacted farmers
to determine what products were
available and worked with local
retailers to place orders. Growers
would pick and pack to order and a
local shipper delivered. Ferraro’s
Foods, Kootenay Market and Kootenay
Kim Charlesworth
New Kootenays growers’ co-op off to promising start
95% of food is imported in spite of strong support to buy local
CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR!
Let us tempt you with something to
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MF 1635 W/DL120 LOADER
2011, A/C, 4WD, AG TIRES, STEREO,
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MASSEY FERGUSON 7622
DEMO UNIT PRICED TO SELL!
200 ENGINE HP, ANALOG & DIGITAL INST PANEL,
$212,950 CASH
2009 VALTRA N141LS AC11.2
SELF LEVELING LDR, 4WD, A/C, BALE SPEAR
W/GRAPPLE FOR BIG SQUARE BALES, 48 KM TOP
SPEED, 2200 HRS. $89,900
2012 BOBCAT T190 COMPACT TRACK LOADER,
HEAT & A/C, HYDRAULIC BUCKET COUPLER, AUX
HYDRAULICS, NEW TRACKS, ELECTRIC PLUG
ADDED, 1399 HRS. $42,900
2004 FENDT 930 4WD, VARIO TRANS, AIR TRAILER
BRAKES, BUDDY SEAT, FRONT WEIGHTS, FRONT
FENDERS, STEREO, 300 ENGINE HP, 4 SET OF REAR
REMOTE HYDS, 10,240 HOURS. $95,500
MF 4270-4 W/LOADER
4WD, 675 LDR, DUAL REMOTES,
REAR WHEEL WEIGHTS, 99 PTO HP,
APROX 4,000 TOTAL HOURS $38,900
2010 KRONE BIG X650
8 ROW CORNHEAD, 12 FT GRASSHEAD,
897 HRS ON THE CUTTER,
980 HRS ON THE MACHINE. $350,000
2013 BOCAT T870 COMPACT TRACK LOADER,
BACK-UP CAMERA, TRACK SUSPENSION, HEAT, A/C,
HIGH FLOW, 2 SPEED, HYDRAULIC BUCKET COU-
PLER, 86" BUCKET, 352 HRS. $81,500
JOHN DEERE 7215R
2012, 4WD, 215 ENGINE HP, 4 SETS OF REAR
REMOTE HYDS, 540/1000 PTO, STEREO, 830 HRS.
$169,900
2014 FELLA TS10055
CENTRE DELIVERY RAKE, 2 POINT HITCH,
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JANUARY 28-30
ABBOTSFORD TRADEX
Please see “TIME” page 24
KBFPC will allow farmers and processors
to scale up production to more financially
successful and better meet the growing
demand for local food.
Country Life in BC • January 201624
See our complete inventory at
FarmersEquip.com
LYNDEN, WASHINGTON
888-855-4981
PRICES IN US DOLLARS
2008 CASE IH PUMA 195
16SP POWERSHIFT, LX770
LOADER, NICE TIRES, 80%
TREAD FE#22554
$120,000
’96 KUBOTA L2350
25 HP, GEAR DRIVE, LB400
LOADER, 540 PTO, TURF TIRES
FE #23278
$8,950
06 NH TM155
4WD, AC, HEAT, 850TL SELF
LEVELING LDR, 5185 HOURS
FE #22791
$59,950
VOLVO L50B WHEEL LOADER
1670 HRS ON REMAN MOTOR,
BKT/FORKS, HYD QUICK
CHANGE BUCKET, GOOD TIRES,
FE#20050
$39,950
JOHN DEERE 9400
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TIME SAVER From page 23
Bakery were just some of the
retailers that were ordering
from KBFPC.
The rst thing the co-op
does is keep the farmer at
home, working his crops
rather than out selling.
Member Willy Fuder gures he
saves a full day a week. Other
advantages can include
sharing of production
knowledge, equipment,
business expertise, the costs
of storage and trucking and
even crop rotation, allowing
members to grow what is
suitable to their land and
expertise, as well as the
development of a brand to
support marketing.
Pilot project
The Columbia Basin Trust
provided money for the
business plan, which was just
completed in November. The
plan expands from the pilot
project to continue and
extend the brokerage and
distribution services, as well as
develop cold storage and
marketing. Future goals
include feed and mulch
purchase and delivery, a
shared labour pool and a value
added processing facility.
“We learned a tremendous
amount on every level with
our 2015 pilot,” says
Charlesworth. “We are very
excited to be expanding our
distribution service in 2016 as
well as adding a storage
facility.”
Charlesworth says they
have nine producers signed
up for 2016 so far and have
contracted cold storage in
Salmo, which is the center of
the target region.
But will they buy?
The answer seems to be a
resounding yes. Charlesworth
says retailers like Kootenay
Market in Castlegar have long
been champions of “buy
Editor,
Re: Enriching the soil with valueable waste,
page 19, November 2015
I have been asked as president of the
Friends of the Nicola Valley Society to
present the other side of the biosolids
debate.
Our view is that farmers, ranchers and
forestry
personnel have
been duped.
The marketing
pitch is the
nitrogen,
phosphorous and organic matter. This,
however, is only half the story.
You see, there is a reason why it is
generally given away for free. The waste
water treatment facilities need to get rid of
their piles of sewer sludge (the collected
and concentrated residuals left over after
cleaning the water).
This represents everything a city pours
down its drains: household chemicals,
industrial toxins, pharmaceuticals, solvents
– you name it. Farms, ranches and forests
are being used as disposal sites for this
end-product – sold as “beneficial biosolids”
– quite a spin!
Many countries have ended this method
of dealing with waste. For instance, a
recent German study concluded “it would
be advisable to gradually phase out the
use of sewage sludge so as to avoid diffuse
loads of potentially harmful substances in
soil.” So, too, the Swiss have stopped
because of “the risk of irreversible damage
to the soil, the danger to public health and
possible negative effects on the quality of
the food farmers produce.”
Our government has made claims about
lots of oversight to protect health. If the
product is, as they say, "stringently
regulated," then why out of the thousands
of toxins known to be in biosolids are only
about a dozen tested for? And how did the
Suzuki Foundation recently find very toxic
components in the bisosolids delivered to
the Nicola Valley from the Lower Mainland?
The water treatment process does a fine
job getting toxins out of the environment.
Why in the world would we start spreading
it back over Mother Earth so it can re-enter
the food chain, and re-toxify our lives?
If biosolids are deemed to be safe, then
why do food companies like Campbell’s,
DelMonte and Whole Foods reject produce
raised with biosolids? Why do dozens of
farm, health and environmental
organizations like the Sierra Club, David
Suzuki Foundation, National Farmers Union
and the Center for Food Safety oppose
using biosolids where we grow food and
graze animals?
There are greener methods of dealing
with this toxic burden. Methods like
pyrolysis rid the environment of the toxins,
have almost zero emissions and return
energy back to the grid.
Let’s get on the right side of history, and
keep the environment toxin-free for the
next generation!
Don Vincent
ww.biosolidsbc.com
The other side of the biosolids debate
Letters
local.” Ferraro Foods in Trail
and Rossland is back on the
program for next year.
“Preliminary conversations
suggest that all seven of our
customers from last year will
be repeats,” says
Charlesworth. “As well, the
Kootenay Co-op in Nelson is
wanting to work with us.”
“At our rst annual general
meeting in November, an
amazing 25 food producers
showed up” says
Charlesworth. “Some were
farmers, some were secondary
producers. Our membership
has doubled and we know we
are on the right track”
Where would the group like
to be in ve years?
“At least owning one of our
own trucks,” muses
Charlesworth. “Having about
30 members throughout the
region who are producing
enough to have vital incomes
from their farming or their
value added processing so
they can stay on their farms
and farm and produce food
and we can do the rest of the
work for them.”
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 25
By the time most of you
read this, yet another
Christmas season will have
come and gone.
As most of us age, we
become wiser (at least, one
would hope that is the case)
and realize that Christmas is
more about giving than
receiving. In this increasingly
mixed up world we exist in, it
has never been more
necessary to remind ourselves
to be kinder, nicer and more
considerate of all others each
and every day, not just at
Christmas. Please try to go
forward in that mindset into
the New Year. I am going to
make a concerted eort to do
that as I see daily examples of
how selsh we have become
as a society on many fronts.
That said, there are many
examples of just the opposite,
demonstrating acts of
extraordinary kindness and
caring. One such instance
came in the form of a recent,
municent donation to the BC
Cattlemen's Association,
announced to the public in
the late fall.
One ordinary work day in
mid-August, BCCA executive
assistant Becky Everett sat at
her desk dealing with the daily
mail delivery, opening letters
and parcels. All was business-
as-usual until Becky slit open a
small white business envelope
with a Vancouver return
address from a rm of trust
lawyers, the contents of
which transformed the
day into the realm of
extraordinary!
Double checking to
ensure that she was
indeed seeing that many
zeros, Becky realized the BC
Cattlemen's Association had
just received a totally
unheralded donation in the
amount of $500,000! Wowzers!
Holy cow! Who gives a gift
that sizeable so quietly,
without any fanfare or prior
notice?
The answer in an act of
seless generosity and caring:
the Riedemann sisters, Sophie
and Myra. Residents of the
Lower Mainland for the past
38 years, the two sisters spent
more than half their earlier
lives residing on the Alkali
Lake Ranch, their family-
owned and operated cattle
ranch, and although life and
circumstance made for the
change of address in the late
1970's, in their hearts they
never fully vacated the
Cariboo or the cattle industry.
F ortunate
Recent beneciaries of an
unexpected inheritance, each
concluded that they were
fortunate (sucient) in all life's
needs and therefore, in a
position where they could just
pay it forward.
After a kitchen table
discussion, the decision was
made to contribute the monies
to the BCCA in memory of their
youngest brother Martin, who
passed away in tragic
circumstances in 1975 at Alkali
Lake. He was owner of Alkali
Lake Ranch at the time.
Newly-named the
Cattlemen's Martin Riedemann
Riedemann family
pays it forward
Sisters Sophie and
Myra Riedemann
have surprised the BC
Cattlemen’s
Association with an
unprecedented
donation in honour
of their brother,
Martin Riedemann.
Martin once owned
Alkali Lake Ranch
where the women
spent their
childhood.
(Photo courtesy of
the Riedemann
family)
Check out
www.bchereford.ca
for a Hereford breeder near you
BCHA Secretary
Janice Tapp
250-699-6466
BCHA President
Murray Gore
604-582-3499
February 20, 2016 —21st Annual ProducƟon Sale, Pine BuƩe Ranch, BC Livestock Co-Op Kamloops,
March 26, 2016 — 43rd Annual Dawson Creek All Breeds Bull Sale, VJV AucƟon Mart Dawson Creek
April 9, 2016 — 41st Annual Vanderhoof All Breeds Bull Sale, BC Livestock Co-op Vanderhoof
April 14&15, 2016 — 79th Annual Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale, BC Livestock Co-op Williams Lake
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Fund, the massive donation
will perpetuate scholarships
and bursaries for BC youth,
students seeking post-
secondary education in the
agricultural and related elds
and ensure a dearly loved
brother will be forever
remembered by an industry
he so loved and appreciated.
The cattle industry is
humbled, thankful for their
support; a wealth of good
fortune for the coming New
Year!
Martin Riedemann
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Country Life in BC • January 201626
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 27
The heartrending but rewarding task
of raising a physically handicapped lamb
Physically-challenged
people get treatment such as
physio and occupational
therapy, suggestions on how
to adapt to live with their
difficulties and prosthetic
devices to assist them in
living a more normal life.
Recently, a few farmers and
their lambs have been
getting some help, too.
Lambs, calves, goats, chickens
and other farm animals are
known to have been fitted
with different sorts of splints
and devices, including Felix,
the New York state lamb that
had a 3-D printed prosthetic
leg made for him.
Their owners, though, need
to show determination to
obtain help.
Gerry and Patricia Porter
know all about this. They run
a dog kennel and
individualized custom
boarding service for dogs and
horses in addition to their
own chickens and a sizeable
sheep operation at Harmony
Valley Farm in the Paxton
Valley, half an hour from
Kamloops.
200 St Croix ewes
Patricia spent over 30 years
breeding, raising and
advising on horses while
Gerry has spent many years
raising cattle and pigs. They
bought their first ewes four
years ago and routinely sell
their better lambs for
breeding stock and the rest
as market lambs. They now
have nearly 200 St Croix
breeding ewes, and managed
to lamb three times in two
years.
They decided on sheep
because there is a big
knapweed problem in their
area, and their St Croix seem
to love it.
But their heart went out to
Blue, their “challenged”
young April 2015-born ram
lamb, named for the colour of
the vet wrap that was bound
about his leg constantly. They
did not have it in them to
slaughter him.
Now, he is running about
with the help of a dog wheel
chair.
Difficulty nursing
“At birth, he wobbled up
and nursed on his mother,
who developed mastitis,”
recalls Gerry. “At about the
age of two weeks, we
noticed one leg was
dragging behind him
and he was having
difficulty nursing.”
They bottle fed and
cared for him and his
twin sister in an individual
pen.
“We struggled with him
from then on,” Patricia
continues. “We did not know
the cause of his leg problem.
He had x-rays which revealed
nothing broken and vets
thought his leg was just
strained. He seemed to be in
pain and hardly ate anything.
We gave him pain medication
and anti-inflammatories. If we
stopped, he was in such pain
he refused feed. After that
came natural remedies to try
to get him weight-bearing
including every kind of
bandage, splint and other
help that we could think of –
herbs, homeopathy,
acupuncture, magnets,
massage, Reiki and our own
chiropractor, you name it – to
get him through. Then, in
early August we saw him
walking on his bad leg again!”
They hoped his problems
were over. But after two
weeks, Felix’s good leg gave
out which, they conjectured,
was from the extra strain of
having compensated for his
erstwhile bad leg for so long.
They almost gave up.
They knew most farmers
would “just bonk him on the
head,” as Patricia puts it. But,
they didn’t have it in them to
do that. Some vets suggested
they stop concentrating on
him and focus on all their
other animals.
“We researched on the
internet and asked around. A
retired visiting vet who was
boarding her dog with us
suggested a dog wheel chair
to take the weight off his hind
end and give his tendons and
ligaments time to hopefully
shorten and heal.
“We investigated that
option. But we are just sheep
farmers and dog boarders
and cannot pay well into the
four figures for such specialty
equipment.
Bloomed overnight
“And then a dog trainer
friend found us a used dog
wheel chair and helped to get
him fitted with it. We put it on
him on November 20 and he
seemed to bloom overnight.”
They take it off him
overnight so that he can lie
down and rest, but in the
morning he is raring to go
and impatient for them to get
it on him quickly.
“His mobility and quality of
life is so much better – and
also, alas, his libido! He butted
me this morning,” exclaimed
Patricia laughing.
A ram lamb in Salmon Arm was given a second chance at life with
the aid of a used dog wheel chair. (Photo courtesy of Gerry and
Patricia Porter)
Wool Gatherings
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Country Life in BC • January 201628
Community gardens keep agriculture thriving in Burnaby
by PETER MITHAM
BURNABY – Community
gardens may not be
commercial-scale agriculture,
but agriculture in Burnaby
might well be lost without the
presence of a 40-year-old
community garden in the
heart of its traditional farming
area.
“Burnaby’s Big Bend has
this long history of agricultural
production tied to these small
lots,” says Jim Wolf, a senior
long range planner for
Burnaby. “It would appear that
we’re not only protecting,
we’re increasing the overall
growth of agriculture in the
Big Bend area.”
The proof lies in a review
Burnaby conducted of its
agricultural lands in 2011, the
rst comprehensive analysis
since a provincial land use
inventory in 2003. During the
period, nearly 70 acres
entered production. The city
now has 319 acres of actively
farmed land and there are
more farmers working the
properties than ever before.
Altogether, they generate
more than $11.5 million in
annual sales.
“Although on the surface it
may seem those lands are
under threat, I would argue,
no,” Wolf says. “We’re actually
seeing an increase in
production, and a lot of take-
up. There’s a lot of people
seeking out those lands. We’re
actually seeing a higher take-
up of agricultural lands for
production than we have in
the past.”
The blossoming of
agriculture in the heart of a
rapidly developing area has
been noted since 1995, even
as vegetable farms were
diminishing. But the heart of
the renaissance may well lie in
the establishment of an
allotment garden as part of a
provincial initiative in 1974.
Fantasy Gardens
One community garden
had already been established
in Richmond by the province
on the site later known as
Fantasy Gardens, and Edie
Fisher asked Burnaby council
if something similar might not
be possible on lands within
the newly created Agricultural
Land Reserve.
Sta considered the report,
and council agreed to lease
14.5 acres to the province for
an allotment garden. Workers
from the BC Ministry of
Agriculture prepared the land
Two happy gardeners get more than just produce from their community garden plot in Burnaby’s Big
Bend area. “We love being in the outdoors, experiencing nature up close and personal, getting our
ngers into the oil and smelling its richness, enjoying the comradeship of like-minded gardeners, and
relishing the garden’s plentiful bounty of really tasty and nutritious produce and the gorgeous fresh
owers.” (Supplied photo)
and installed servicing for 372
plots, also serving as resource
sta for the gardeners during
the summer.
“It was socializing through
gardening, but also food
production,” recalls Jim
Mactier, one of two summer
students who worked on the
Burnaby garden and prepared
the ground with a rototiller
nicknamed Howard.
The gardens in Richmond
and Burnaby were joined by
developments in Victoria and
elsewhere as part of the
province’s desire “to aord
participants the opportunity
of getting on the land to grow
their own vegetables.”
While many of the
gardeners were middle class,
the objective was to increase
local food production and
food security on land ideal for
the purpose.
“It’s actually tied to this very
interesting cultural history of
the Big Bend … right back to
the 1890s,” Wolf says.
Popular with immigrants
The market garden
movement of the late 19th
century saw acreages in the
area broken up into two-acre
parcels that a family could
easily cultivate to supply their
own needs, and those of
neighbours. The parcels were
popular with immigrants,
especially the Chinese.
“You could have a couple of
acres, you could produce
strawberries, small fruits,
bunch vegetables and actually
have a comfortable living and
even if you didn’t sell them,
you could sustain your family
on a small lot,” Wolf explains.
“Burnaby’s little community
down there supplied most of
the bunch vegetables for the
local markets well into the 20s,
30s and 40s. … It was urban; it
was close. So you could cut
your vegetables and have
them to the market that very
day. It really created this little
economy that worked quite
successfully, and still works
The establishment of allotment gardens in
1974 may be the heart of the renaissance
Please see “AG” page 29
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC 29
AG ZONE From page 28
quite successfully.”
But zoning changes in 1948
designated everything below
Marine Way as industrial,
eectively ending the
development of new farms
and increasing pressure on
existing operations.
The local community
pushed back, however,
galvanizing support for
maintaining the city’s
agricultural zones. A new
community plan for the Big
Bend area in 1972 reinstated
the area’s agricultural zoning
and recognized the
importance of local farms to
the local economy.
“The community, the
grassroots in the 1960s and
1970s, turned around the idea
that all this amenity should be
lost,” Wolf says, and the
allotment gardens were a
result of the new awareness.
Chris Mann, a member of
the Burnaby and Region
Allotment Garden Association
that has leased the gardens
from the city on ve-year
terms since 1979 and oversees
its operation, is thankful for
the chance the gardens give
yardless city-dwellers like
herself to grow their own
food.
Good for the soul
“We’re all extremely
grateful that this land is still
available,” she says. “I live in a
townhouse so I don’t have a
place to grow anything, and
my friends are the same. We
grow owers and vegetables,
so we get to have plenty of
food from the garden, as well
as beauty, too, which is also
good for one’s soul.”
But the key role the
gardens have played in
ensuring parcels within the
ALR remain in production isn’t
lost on her.
“It’s remarkable and
wonderful that this land
continues to thrive as an
agricultural area,” she says.
“It’s so big, and it’s remained
dedicated to agriculture for
over 40 years.”
While other municipalities
question how to bring
underutilized parcels into
production, community
gardens have given Burnaby a
solution that is now bearing
fruit – and vegetables – for a
new generation of farmers
who are making a go as small-
lot producers serving local
markets.
“Where we have preserved
land for agriculture and have
preserved, through our
policies, the ALR boundaries,
we’ve been very successful,”
Wolf says. “Those lands have
become increasingly more
valuable to producers to users,
and the lands have been
taken up.”
Chris Mann,
left, has been
gardening in
Burnaby’s Big
Bend
community
plots for almost
10 years. She
originally
joined to help
out a friend and
eventually
stayed longer
than that friend
did. Below,
Country Life in
BC’s Lisa Bealle
exercises her
green thumb at
the community
garden.
(Supplied
photo)
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On display at the
Country Life in BC • January 201630
DEALER INFO AREA
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by DAVID SCHMIDT
HASTINGS, NZ – The
Chinese market is seeing red
and New Zealand fruit growers
are hoping to capitalize on
that.
Red is a very important
colour to the Chinese and they
associate it with better health,
says Brian Ennis, chief
executive ocer of Prevar Ltd.
in New Zealand.
An entity similar to the
Summerland Varieties Corp
(SVC), Prevar is co-owned by
Apple & Pear Australia, Pipfruit
New Zealand and Plant & Food
Research. New apple and pear
varieties are bred by Plant &
Food Research of New Zealand
under contract to Prevar which
then commercializes them.
“Our objective is to breed
super sweet apples with
resistance to major pests and
diseases which can be grown
in low or no-spray
NZ apple growers look to China for export growth
Kiwifruit remains largest horticultural trade crop
New Zealand is an island
country in the southwestern
Pacific Ocean. The country
geographically comprises two
main landmasses – that of the
North and South Island and
many smaller islands. New
Zealand is situated some
1,500 kilometres (900 mi)
east of Australia across the
Tasman Sea. It has an area of
267,710 km
2
(103,738 mi
2
),
making it slightly smaller than
Japan and a little larger than
the United Kingdom. It was one
of the last lands to be settled
by humans. During its long
isolation, New Zealand
developed a distinctive
biodiversity of animal and plant
life. The capital city is
Wellington, while its most
populous city is Auckland.
Associate Editor David Schmidt recently returned from the 2015
International Federation of Agriculture Journalists conference
held in New Zealand. On the 3-week tour he visited diverse
agricultural operations in the country.
Over the next few months, Country Life in BC will present a series
of feature articles from his experiences.
management systems,” Ennis
explains.
New Zealand is the rst
apple breeding program in the
world to use whole genome
selection which Ennis says will
cut breeding time in half.
Since being formed 10 years
ago, Prevar has licenced four
new apple cultivars: Sweetie,
Smitten, Honeymoon and
Rockit, but Ennis is most
excited about the progress
being made on developing
red esh apples for the
Chinese market.
The new apples are based
on germplasm obtained in
Kazakhstan in 1980. Type 1 has
a red to dark red esh which is
visible throughout the growth
of the apple while Type 2 has a
light red esh which only
colours up at ripening.
“Both types are close to pre-
commercial release and we
expect them to be in the
market in three to ve years,”
Ennis says.
Not all promising new apple
varieties come out of
established breeding
programs. That is the case with
Plumac, a very tasty new apple
which was a chance discovery
in a New Zealand orchard,
much like Ambrosia was
discovered as a rogue tree in
Cawston. However, unlike
Ambrosia, which is licensed
and marketed by SVC, the
discoverers of Plumac have
not only kept the rights but
trademarked it as the Koru
apple.
“You can only protect
yourself with plant breeders
rights for 23 years. It takes you
15 years to develop the variety
so you only have seven years
to recoup your investment,”
explains Andy McGrath of
McGrath Nurseries. “We have
branded our apple as Koru
and are setting up a global
production system for it so we
can retain the rights for much
longer.”
McGrath has the capacity
and experience to take on
such a major undertaking as
his is one of, if not the largest,
fruit tree nursery in New
Zealand (he grows 350,000
apple, cherry and apricot
seedlings and 750,000
rootstocks annually) and also
already holds New Zealand
licensing rights for Honeycrisp
and other new fruit varieties.
Although New Zealand only
grows 0.5% of the world’s
apples, it accounts for 4% of
world apple exports – a value
of almost NZ$550 million.
Almost half of their apple
exports are to China and other
Asian countries, 15% head to
the UK and 10% to the US.
Apple exports are dwarfed
by exports of kiwifruit which
totaled NZ$930 million in
2014.
“Kiwifruit is New Zealand’s
biggest horticultural export
crop,” says Zespri innovation
manager Bryan Parkes, noting
it has the highest nutrient
density and highest vitamin C
content of any fruit.
Despite New Zealand’s
announced anity for “free”
trade, all its kiwifruit is
exported by Zespri, which is
owned by current and former
kiwifruit growers.
“Single desk marketing
allows scale, a united brand
and co-ordinated marketing,”
Parkes explains.
Although everyone
associates kiwifruit with New
Zealand, it is not native to that
country. It originated in the
Dr. Brett Ennis, chief executive of New Zealand pipfruit breeding
company, Prevar, points to some of the new apples and pears the
company is developing. (David Schmidt photos)
Please see “KIWIS” page 31
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 31
KIWIS NOT NATIVE From page 30
Chinese forest and was
originally referred to as the
Chinese gooseberry. In fact,
there is still more kiwifruit
grown in the Northern than
the Southern Hemisphere.
However, since the rst exports
came from NZ, it became
known as kiwifruit, regardless
of where it was grown.
“We lost the brand so we
are now rebranding our fruit
as Zespri,” Parkes says.
While traditional kiwifruit
has a green esh, Zespri,
through the government-
owned Plant & Food Research
(P&FR), started developing a
yellow-eshed kiwifruit several
decades ago, bringing it onto
the market early this century. It
caught on quickly with both
growers and consumers. By
2005, Zespri Gold represented
25% of total NZ kiwifruit
production and its share has
grown steadily ever since.
Parkes believes it will not be
long before production of
yellow-eshed kiwifruit
exceeds green-eshed fruit.
Then disaster struck. PSA, a
bacterial kiwifruit vine disease,
came in to the orchards and
tore through the gold kiwifruit
variety, which was particularly
susceptible to the disease.
“PSA arrived in our orchard
on August, 5, 2011. By October
25, we had cut out 85 hectares
of our 100 hectare orchard,”
recalls Leighton Oats, general
manager of Bay Gold, one of
NZ’s larger growers.
Fortunately, P&FR was
about to release a second gold
variety. Not only was it as
good as the original gold
variety, but it was PSA-
resistant. Zespri sped up the
release and growers quickly
replanted to the new variety.
“It is not immune to PSA but
we can manage it,” Oats says,
adding the experience has
actually benetted the
industry. “We thought we
were good growers before,
but we’re much better now.
We no longer move plants
from one area to another.”
“We could have had a
potentially dierent scenario if
we didn’t have the resistant
variety ready,” says Rachel
Brodie of Trevalyan, one of
NZ’s leading kiwifruit packers.
As they are doing in apples,
P&FR is now developing a red-
esh kiwifruit, again in hopes
of catering to the Chinese
preference for red-esh fruit.
McGrath
Nurseries in
Hamilton,
New Zealand,
created this
custom-built
sprayer for its
tree fruit
nursery stock.
Above: Zespri innovation manager Bryan Parkes in the test orchard
for the New Zealand kiwifruit breeding program.
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January 2016 • Country Life in BC 33
Rural policing falls short of what’s needed, say ranchers, wineries
by PETER MITHAM
KAMLOOPS – Butchering
and burglaries have
skyrocketed in rural BC over
the last year, prompting calls
from ranchers and winery
owners for greater policing of
their properties.
Rustling and poaching of
cattle increased noticeably
across the province this fall, in
tandem with a spree of
burglaries at wineries across
the south Okanagan.
“We are seeing … high
numbers that are missing in
some areas,” BC Cattlemens’
Association executive director
Kevin Boon says. “It is
denitely on an increase from
what we had before.”
Coldstream Ranch, for
example, has lost nearly a
dozen animals, some of which
were butchered in broad
daylight and their
forequarters left to rot. Others
have disappeared entirely.
Additional cases are
working their way through the
courts in Dawson Creek and
Kamloops but in most of the
incidents, the culprits remain
at large.
“It’s really hard to pinpoint
what our suspects are,” Boon
says. “With predators, there’s
other things that show signs;
when we just lose the cattle,
those signs aren’t there.”
The problem has been
particularly acute this year
because the value of cattle
has more than doubled.
“Two, three years ago, that
animal that was out there was
worth probably $800 or $900,”
he says. “[It’s] now worth
$1,800 or $1,900.”
With dozens of cattle now
missing, the cost to ranchers is
in the tens of thousands of
dollars – but with rural police
detachments understaed,
the losses may well be a cost
of doing business.
The province’s contract
with the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police (RCMP)
provides for a constable to
address livestock crimes, but
the position has been unlled
since March 2015 when the
sole remaining constable
retired. (Originally, there were
two.)
“We are yet to have his
replacement named,” Boon
says. “We are meeting with
RCMP in the coming weeks
but we need to get this in to
place sooner than later.”
Winery thefts
The situation will sound
familiar to wineries in the
south Okanagan, where a
spate of break-ins this fall
prompted Glenn Fawcett,
president of Black Hills Estate
Winery, opposite Oliver, to
launch a petition on
Change.org asking the
province to commandeer
additional resources to the
local RCMP detachment.
The detachment is
responsible for a swathe of
the southern interior that runs
from Manning Park in the
west to Bridesville in the east,
and from the US border north
to Summerland.
To provide police services
to the area, RCMP have an
ocer on call when ocers
are not on duty, explains
Corporal Dan Moskaluk, who
handles media relations for
the Mounties in the South
Okanagan from oces in
Penticton.
“[The] Oliver and Osoyoos
detachment, as many small
communities throughout
British Columbia, do not
operate on a 24-hour on-duty
police presence,” he says. “We
do have to provide 24-hour
police coverage in the sense
that if there’s a call received,
an ocer seven days a week,
24 hours a day, [is] there to
respond on a call-out basis.”
That’s cold comfort to
those who signed the petition,
many of whom provided vivid
testimony of the eect the
region’s rising crime rate has
had on their lives and
livelihoods.
Sumac Ridge Estate Winery
in Summerland, for instance,
has been broken into more
than 10 times over the course
of 18 months, while a sister
property in Oliver has been hit
15 times.
See Ya Later Ranch, also
owned by parent Vincor
Canada, had quads taken at
the end of November, but GPS
tags allowed the equipment –
and the suspects – to be
apprehended.
Still, the need for greater
police resources remains.
“Based on what we have
heard, there are two groups of
culprits,” Fawcett says. “I
believe the three caught at
See Ya Later Ranch are just
one of the groups.”
Mosklauk, however, says no
amount of police presence
can stop thieves.
“We could have extra
ocers on and that still won’t
guarantee to eliminate thefts,”
he says.
Boon agrees that it’s
impossible to keep an eye on
properties and livestock all
the time, even with the most
sophisticated surveillance
equipment. However, if
ranchers are ready to spend a
dime on prevention, police
need to be ready to spend the
dollars need to cure the
problems that crop up.
“It’s highly urgent that we
do so,” he says.
Even though beef prices are falling, they’re still a valuable commodity and ranchers throughout the
province have been tallying losses to theft over the past year. (Joan Trask le photo)
February 20
th
Kamloops 1:00pm Annual Pine Butte Ranch Horned Hereford Production Sale
March 5
th
Williams Lake 1:00pm Prime Time Bull Sale & Cutting Edge Cattle Bull Sale
March 8
th
Kamloops
Valley Charolais Bull Sale RRTS Charolais
March 12
th
Williams Lake
Harvest Angus Bull Sale
March 19
th
Kamloops 12:30pm
Angus Advantage Bull Sale
March 21
st
OK Falls All Breeds Bull Sale
March 26
th
Vanderhoof 1:00pm
Northern Alliance Black & Red Angus Bull Sale
April 2
nd
Williams Lake 1:00pm
Best Bet Bull Sale, Mitchell Cattle Co. & Guest
April 9
th
Vanderhoof 12:00pm
All Breeds Bull Sale
April 14 & 15
th
Williams Lake Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale
ll
S
a
le
Tuesday
January 26
th
Kamloops is
hosting a complete
herd dispersal of
350 bred cows for
Bar M Ranch
BCL
BCL
Eligibility Requirements
• Schedule 2 Highways, Schedule 1 Highways, and Railway Corridors.
Secondary (sideroad) paved routes may also be considered.
• Must be a livestock producer.
• Fence must be part of an existing fencing system to contain livestock.
Application forms available at:
http://www.cattlemen.bc.ca/fencing.htm
Call TOLL FREE 1.866.398.2848 to have an application mailed to you.
Application Deadline
August 31, 2016 for consideration for the 2017 construction year.
NOW accepting applications for the
Provincial Livestock Fencing Program
along travel corridors
Provincial Livestock Fencing Program
Country Life in BC • January 201634
Losses spur ranchers to call for controlled elk hunt
by CHRIS YATES
QUICK – Elk are grazers.
They eat grass and they don’t
care where they nd it.
Farmers elds and forage
stockyards are a favourite
hangout. What was once a
small herd satised by what
grows on undeveloped
rangeland in the Bulkley Valley
has become several herds
spread across farmers’ elds
wreaking havoc on feed, stock,
fences and crops. So say the
farmers.
“We don’t want to wipe elk
out. We’re farmers. We live
with wildlife all the time. We
want them controlled so they
don’t put us out of business,”
says Bulkley Valley rancher
Lynda Dykens. “We’re looking
for a balance, the same as we
have with deer, moose and
bears.”
Dykens was addressing a
group of about 20 concerned
cattlemen, dairymen and
hunters gathered at Round
Lake Hall in Quick last month
at a meeting sponsored by the
Agriculture Wildlife Program
and Skeena Regional
Cattlemen’s Association. The
provincial government will not
acknowledge there’s a
problem until there’s proof of
numbers, she told her
audience. The only way to get
permission for an elk hunt will
be to count.
Dykens says she’s been
working with Bulkley Valley
Cattlemen (BVCA) chairperson
Matt Taylor and members
Rene Dieleman and Harold
Kerr to attract government
action. Through the Skeena
Regional Cattlemen’s
Association, the foursome are
circulating an Elk Population
Forage and Fencing Damage
Survey to establish how many
people have had elk on their
land, losses suered and
where they are located.
They’ve written letters to at
least 14 government bodies
and, as a result, the Agriculture
Wildlife Program (AWP) has
agreed to support their eorts
to put together a case for a
hunt.
With the help of Ministry of
Agriculture representative
John Stevenson, the four have
taken the surveys completed
so far and transferred the
information onto a map of the
area showing where there has
been damage, what has been
done and how many elk have
been sighted. There are red
dots across the valley and
beyond.
No map needed
Dykens’ audience didn’t
need a map. Most had lost
feed for their cattle, fencing,
newly planted elds and even
young stock taken by the
wolves that follow the elk
Elk are night
feeders. This
fellow is
enjoying a
salt lick left
out for Robert
Kirsch’s cows.
Bulkley Valley
ranchers are
calling for
better control
of elk herds in
the region.
(Chris Yates
photo)
herds.
“I know of one rancher who
lost 13 calves last summer to
wolves following elk. That’s a
loss of $1,200 to $1,500 per
animal.”
One member of the
audience said his neighbour’s
horse was attacked by a bull
elk and $1,600 later, was on
the mend. Another said elk
had been seen running horses
through a fence.
“They run cattle away from
their feeders and keep them
away,” said another.
Forage producer Robert
Kirsch owns 600 acres in Quick
and said he sells hay to
farmers from the Bulkley Valley
west to the Queen Charlotte
Islands and has done so for
many years. He has 7,000 bales
under cover and has to
maintain the cover to
discourage the elk that now
bunk down year round on his
land. His problem is their
penchant for eating his feed
before he can get it harvested,
and destroying cropland
before the forage can grow.
He also worries that the
regular highway crossings
between his elds is going to
result in a serious vehicle
accident.
Multiple herds
Bow hunter Adam Moleski,
whose work takes him through
the region, says he’s seen 63
elk at one time on Kirsch’s
elds and at least six six-point
bucks at one time. When asked
if there is more than one herd
in the area, Moleski said, “I’ve
seen them all the way up the
highway to Houston from
Smithers. I have seen a big
herd in Evelyn and the
Coalmine area in Telkwa, many
around Babine Lake, and there
are tons of them on the
Lawson Road. Other people I
know have seen lots around
Hazelton, Francois Lake near
Burns Lake, the Tatlow Road
area and I know a farmer who
has lots on his place out in
Driftwood. It’s safe to say they
are everywhere now.”
Discussion ranged from
ways to do a reliable count,
ways to conduct a responsible
cull, how to protect land and
forage and how to get the
government’s attention on
what is becoming a livelihood
issue for farmers.
It was decided to strike a
committee including
representation from all groups
present to gather enough
pertinent information to
present a convincing
argument for the need to
manage the elk population.
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GENTLE CROP HANDLING FOR MINIMAL LEAF LOSS
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 35
Okanagan Specialty Fruit marketing manager Joel Brooks. (David
Schmidt photo)
by DAVID SCHMIDT
LANGLEY – In the last few
decades, such genetically
modied (GMO) crops as
corn, soybean and cotton
have become popular with
farmers. GMO crops are now
grown by 18 million farmers
in 28 countries, Okanagan
Specialty Fruits (OSF)
marketing communications
specialist Joel Brooks told the
BC Young Farmers Farm Fest
in Langley, November 21.
He calls GMO technology
just another step in plant
breeding. For millennia,
farmers and researchers have
been using selective breeding
techniques to improve plants.
Corn is an example. In 7000
BC, it was a plant with tiny
kernels containing little or no
sugar and could be grown
only in selected climates.
Today, corn is grown around
the world and its kernels are
huge and lled with sugar.
Push back
Although farmers have had
“phenomenal results” with
GM crops, Brooks admits
consumers have been
“pushing back” against GMO’s
because they haven’t seen
any real benets for
consumers. OSF believes its
technology does oer
benets to consumers and
will therefore turn the tide of
public opinion towards
biotechnology.
Okanagan apple and
cherry orchardists Neal and
Louisa Carter founded OSF
in 1996 with the intention
of offering the industry
and consumers something
to reverse the steady
decline in apple
consumption. They believe
they have accomplished that
with the non-browning Arctic
apple.
Science proven
Prior to settling in the
Okanagan, Carter had worked
as a bioresource engineer
around the world, and used
his experience to develop the
science behind the non-
browning apple. The science
was proven early this century
and approved in both Canada
and the US in 2015. Brooks
expects the rst Arctic apples
to become widely available in
2017.
He stresses the Arctic apple
is not a new variety, rather it
is a technique which inputs a
gene into the leaf of an apple
tree. The gene causes the
treated tree to “silence” the
polyphenol oxidase (PPO)
enzyme which causes the
browning.
Although the technology
can be applied to any apple
variety, OSF has to date only
applied it to Golden Delicious
and Granny Smith varieties.
Fujis and Galas with the
technology are now in eld
trials.
A bruiser
Brooks says consumers can
clearly see the benets of the
technology, proving it by
smashing two apples, one the
Arctic apple and the other a
non-Arctic version of the
same apple against the
podium at the beginning of
his talk. At the end of his 20-
minute speech, he cut open
both apples. The bruise in the
conventional apple was
already turning brown while
the Arctic apple showed no
change in colour.
“Arctic apples look and
taste better,” he insisted.
Brooks said over half of
consumers consider browning
a signicant issue, adding
40% of apples are never
consumed, largely due to
browning. He admits an initial
survey of consumers found
that 51% do not want a non-
browning apple but is
convinced a focus on
consumer education will
change that.
GMO crops can offer benefits to consumers
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While opinion polls still show opposition to the British Columbia-developed
Arctic apple, advocates are convinced there is a market for non-bruising fruit
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Country Life in BC • January 201636
Henderson gets a dose of the wrong end of a veal deal
When we left o last time,
Henderson was unimpressed
that Deborah was keen to play
the part of Daisy Mae in the
spring musical of Lil Abner.
Meanwhile, Merv Devaney was
laying the groundwork to set up
Henderson for the second time.
Rural Redemption (part 68)
continues ...
Mervyn Devaney called
Kenneth Henderson’s cell
phone late in the evening of
the following day to arrange a
time to deliver the calves that
would launch him on the fast
track to agricultural prosperity.
Merv said the calves would
settle in best if there weren’t
too many people around. They
agreed that after lunch, when
Deborah would be o to town
and the kids were at school,
would probably be best.
Kenneth was cursing the
stripped remains of the
Christmas tree onto the front
porch when Merv Devaney’s
pickup pulled his battle
scarred horse trailer up the
driveway. Merv tooted the
horn three times as he passed
the house and headed for the
barn. He was backed up and
waiting at the barn door when
Kenneth arrived.
“Where do you want
them?” asked Merv.
“I’m not sure. How
many are there?”
“Four.”
“I can’t take four.
There are only two
stalls,” said Kenneth.
“No problem. You can put
all of them in together in the
rst one there.”
Merv swung the trailer’s
tailgate open and Kenneth
Henderson caught his rst
glimpse of the veal business.
There were four black and
white calves eyeing him
suspiciously from the trailer’s
gloomy depth.
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The Woodshed
Chronicles
BOB COLLINS
“They look kind of spindly.”
said Kenneth. “What kind are
they?”
“Holsteins,” said Merv. “But
don’t let the size fool you.
They grow real quick. Hop in
and send them my way and I’ll
steer them into the stall.”
Kenneth climbed gingerly
into the trailer and joined the
knot of calves. He waved his
hands in the air over their
heads and pleaded with them
to “shoo.”
“How do you make them
go?” asked Kenneth.
“Stick your thumb in its
mouth and back up when it
starts sucking.”
Kenneth straightened up
scowling.
“Come on, Devaney. What
do you take me for? You might
have played me for a sucker
once but it won’t happen
again.”
Merv climbed into the
trailer.
“Watch this,” he said as he
laid his hand on the neck of
the closest calf and tickled his
thumb into its mouth. The calf
started to suck and followed
Merv’s thumb all the way to
the box stall. “Nothing to it.”
Kenneth stuck is thumb into
the next calf’s mouth and
started leading it out of the
trailer. The calf gave its head a
violent thrust and dragged a
razor sharp incisor the length
of his thumb.
“Owwwww, he bit me!”
Kenneth stood grasping his
bleeding thumb and sucking
his breath through clenched
teeth.
“Probably mistook you for a
cream-pu,” muttered Merv as
he climbed back into the
trailer. It took ten minutes of
concerted coaxing and
shoving to convince the
remaining calves to
disembark.
By the time it was over,
Kenneth Henderson was in a
lather; angry, sweat soaked,
and blood stained. There was
a particularly foul smelling
substance soaked into the
right leg of his trousers from
the hip to the knee. Kenneth
pinched the sticky pant leg
and tried to pull it away from
his leg.
“What the hell is this?” he
demanded. “It stinks!”
The unloading ordeal
hadn’t weighed nearly as
heavily on Merv, who manned
the thumb-sucking part and
left the pushing to Kenneth.
He was chuckling in spite of
himself.
“That there is a by-product
of the cattle business. There’ll
be lots more where that came
from. If you’re careful about
saving it, you can put it on
your garden in the spring and
grow yourself some prize
winning pickles for the Fall
Fair.
Kenneth glared at Merv.
“What the hell am I
supposed to do with them
now?”
“Just feed them and keep
them clean and make sure
they don’t get sick and you’ll
be away to the races.”
“What do they eat?”
“All they need is milk
replacer for now. You’ll want
to start them in a bit of hay
and starter in a week or so. I
brought you some milk
replacer.”
Merv went to his truck and
dragged a bag of milk replacer
that had been in the bottom
of his freezer for longer than
he could remember.
“There’s enough here for a
couple of days, ‘til you get to
the feed store,” said Merv.
“There’s a little plastic cup in
there. One cup morning and
night for each one should do it
until they grow a little. Looks
like you’re all set to go so I’ll
leave you to it.”
Merv hesitated as he
climbed into the truck.
“One more thing,” he said.
“You should probably take
your pants o before you go
in the house.”
Kenneth walked to the
house cursing Mervyn
Devaney every step of the
way. He dropped his trousers
on the laundry room oor and
headed for the shower.
Deborah was coming through
the door with two arm loads of
groceries as he walked out of
the bathroom.
“What on earth is going on?
It smells to high heaven in the
laundry room. Did Duchess do
her business back there
again?”
To be continued ...
situation calling for a
generous dose of cautious
kindness.
Then there’s climate
change. Much of the debate
as to the reality of global
warming has dissipated; the
allowable rate of rising global
temperature and the best way
of addressing it, however, is
still under
considerable debate.
I won’t introduce my
feelings regarding
the subject of oil
into the discussion
but suce it to say,
each individual can
and should treat the earth
with respect. For me, this
means using my homemade
cloth shopping bags as part
of my commitment to living
by the maxim of reduce,
recycle and reuse. It’s not
much, but if all us 35 million
Canadians did our best, the
dierence would equal the
contents of an entire
container of that goodness-
brand of lubricant.
Above all, it’s the old but
proven principle of
demonstrating kindness in
our own back yard. We all face
contentious situations at
some point in our lives but it’s
how we treat one another
that aects the way we will
face next December. Or next
month, or next week. Or, how
by LINDA WEGNER
Once again, we’re standing
on the verge of the unknown.
Last year, it was the same: we
wondered what awaited us in
2015, and in all the Januarys
before that, we did the same.
Now, peering into 2016, we
can merely guess what lies
ahead. Only by looking back
is it possible to put the full
impact of those 365 days,
compressed into twelve
somewhat equal months, into
perspective.
Let’s face it, though.
Looking ahead has the
potential either to scare the
wits out of us or to excite us
with new challenges. In my
quest to pen something
meaningful regarding the
coming year, I came across an
article that puts my nebulous
thoughts into rock-solid
words. The writer of this piece
of wisdom is unknown to me
but here’s what was said:
“There is a story of an old
man who carried a little can of
oil with him everywhere he
went and if he passed
through a door that
squeaked, he poured a little
oil on the hinges. If a gate was
hard to open, he oiled the
latch. And thus he passed
through life lubricating all
hard places and making it
easier for those who came
after him.”
I couldn’t have expressed it
better myself. Now, in my own
words, here are a few of my
personal thoughts regarding
the uncertainty and the
promise of the coming year.
First, I am proud to be a
citizen of a country that
welcomes those in need. Does
the thought of tens of
thousands of refugees
arriving en masse bring with it
potential danger? Of course.
That fear could be realized
but we’ve also got our own
home-grown perpetrators of
hate crime. I’m married to a
man who, along with his
siblings, escaped the horrors
of Nazi Germany; they and
their ospring now proudly
call Canada home. I guess you
could cite this as a current
A Wannabe Farmer
LINDA WEGNER
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 37
Make a difference
in the new year,
one day at a time
we face ourselves tomorrow.
Disagreements can wound
deeply but by judiciously
applying the oil of
reconciliation, we could make
a dierence in our world. If
that doesn’t work, no one
needs that healing touch
more than we do.
In closing, here’s a quote
by Bill Vaughan: An optimist
stays up until midnight to see
the New Year in. A pessimist
stays up to make sure the old
year leaves.
Happy New Year to each of
you, no matter when or how
you celebrated the event.
May your days be lled with
deep satisfaction, resolved
problems and a sense of
meaningful accomplishment.
Oh, and keep your oil can
lled! There are many around
you who need its healing
contents.
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Golden year
Golden Ears 4-H Community Club members celebrated their success at an annual awards
banquet in late October. Members participated in many events including, communications,
judging, writing, education displays and project competitions. Everyone in the Golden Ears
Community Club is looking forward to next year. (Photo courtesy of Naomi Carson)
British Columbia Angus Association
ANGUS BULLS
SEEDSTOCK SALES | EVENTS
March 5
Prime Time & Cutting Edge, 1 pm Williams Lake
March 7
Select Sale, Dawson Creek
March 12
Harvest Angus, Williams Lake
March 19
Angus Advantage, 12:30 Kamloops
March 26
Northern Alliance Bull Sale, 1 pm Vanderhoof
April 2
Best Bet, 1 pm Williams Lake
April 2
Gumbo Gulch Bull Sale, 1 pm Dawon Creek
April 9
Vanderhoof All Breeds, 12 pm
April 14/15
Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale
BC ANGUS
Tom DeWaal . President . 250.960.0022
Jack Brown . Field Man . 778.593.7410
Jill Savage . Secretary . 250.679-2813
www.bcangus.ca
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COUNTRY
Life
in BC
With the holidays over, many of us make the decision to
push away from the table, to substitute baked for fried; to have
larger servings of lean vegetables and smaller ones of meat, or
to concentrate on such simpler food as stir-fries and stews
where vegetables are king.
It’s important that you remember that life doesn’t have to be
a choice between eating to live and living to eat.
There are lots of delicious ways to cook meals that are
healthy for you, too. With very little eort, you can make much
healthier meals from scratch than any packaged meal you can
buy from the store or a
fast-food outlet.
Open your
pocketbook in the
produce store, at the
farmers’ market or in the
produce section of your
supermarket instead of
buying the more expensive and less healthy prepared,
processed, canned or frozen foods – or fast foods prepared by a
colonel or a clown.
Try reducing the quantity of bread and buns in your daily
diet, and buy only whole grains rather than white, and right
away, you’ve made another healthy change in how you eat by
reducing the empty calories you take in.
Instead of cake, cookies or candy for dessert, opt for fresh
fruit, and for snacks, turn to fresh fruit or vegetables instead of
over-salted, doused-in-fat and laden-with-sugar options from a
package.
Simple food doesn’t need a package, nor added salt, oil and
sugar.
All our best chefs are convinced of the importance of eating
fresh, local foods, made from scratch, and we now just have to
convince them to reduce the fats and salt in what they create –
or we can choose to eat such creations only occasionally.
During these short, dark days of mid-winter, a special
candlelight dinner, served in front of a roaring re will add a
little extra sparkle to help push away the dark and you can plan
for the coming of longer, lighter days.
Country Life in BC • January 201638
Jude’s Kitchen
JUDIE STEEVES
This is a healthier alternative to the traditional chicken breast or veal stued with cheese and
ham and with a creamy sauce poured over it. This one is not fried in butter, but baked instead
and I used a low fat cheese, light prosciutto ham and a stful of spinach in each. There’s no full-
fat, rich, creamy sauce either, but it was yummy.
2 chicken breasts Flour, to dredge chicken
sea salt and fresh-ground black pepper 1 egg
2 c. (500 ml) baby spinach leaves 1 tbsp. (15 ml) cold water
3 slices lean prosciutto ham 3/4 c. (175 ml) Panko bread crumbs
1 oz. (28 g) light Swiss cheese Salt and pepper, to taste
Pre-heat oven to 400 F.
Carefully slice each chicken breast in half horizontally, to reduce its thickness. Don’t slice all
the way through, so you can open up the breast to ll it. Place a piece of waxed paper over it and
gently pound it with a pan, the at side of a cleaver or a wooden mallet where it is thickest, to
even out the thickness.
Season the breast. Wilt the spinach leaves in the microwave for a minute and let cool.
Slice the cheese and cover one half of each breast with slices, using just a quarter of the
cheese. Top with the cooled spinach, then another quarter of the sliced cheese and the thinly-
sliced ham. Repeat with the other chicken breast.
Close the breasts to sandwich the lling in. You may use a couple of toothpicks to hold each
together.
Prepare a breading station with an egg beaten with a drizzle of cold water in a at dish and
the bread crumbs seasoned with salt and pepper in another. Dust the breasts with our before
immersing in the egg and then dipping into the crumbs.
Lay each breast in a baking pan covered with parchment paper.
Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until just cooked. Serves 2-4.
Leaner cuisine
Baking makes this cordon bleu easy. (Judie Steeves photo)
Please see “ARLAʼS” page 39
I was worried they’d find something
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Baked Chicken Cordon Bleu
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NEWS & INFORMATION YOU (& YOUR FRIENDS) NEED!
January 2016 • Country Life in BC 39
This recipe originated from a friend who had a ranch down the road from us in the Cariboo.
This is not only delicious, but it’s suitable for those who cannot eat wheat, because it’s thickened
with cornmeal instead of our.
2 lb. (1 kg) lean beef 1 tsp. (5 ml) salt
2 cloves of garlic, minced 4 to 6 carrots, sliced
1 onion, sliced 1 or 2 stalks of celery, sliced
2 1/2 c. (625 ml) beef or chicken broth 1 tbsp. (15 ml) minced jalapeno peppers
2 tsp. (10 ml) dried oregano 2 tbsp. (30 ml) cornmeal
1 tsp. (5 ml) cumin powder
Trim meat and either cube it or cut into thick strips.
Heat oil in a Dutch oven and brown the meat and onions, adding the minced garlic, then the
broth and spices, except the hot peppers. (You could leave them out if you’d prefer.)
Add sliced carrots and celery.
Bring to bubbling, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for a couple of hours, either on the
stove or in a medium oven.
When the meat is tender, stir in minced peppers and cornmeal and bring back to bubbling,
simmering for a half hour longer, until the sauce is nice and thick.
This could also be cooked in a slow cooker, all day on low, then the peppers and cornmeal
added for the last hour of cooking.
This is good served on squares of cornbread or on brown rice.
Serves 6 to 8.
ARLAʼS BEEF STEW WITH SPICES AND CORNMEAL From page 38
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Serving Western Canadian Agriculture
100% Natural
Animal Feed Supplement
& Fertilizer
Flack’s Bakerview
Kelp Products Inc
Pritchard, BC
LIVESTOCK
GOOD GROUP OF 5 COLOURED
AND 2 WHITE ROMNEY EWE LAMBS
Available late August on.
Correct, well grown and healthy.
Lovely fleeces. Twins and triplets.
Weigh between 90 and 110 lbs.
Vaccinated. RR or RQ.
Sell with/without papers.
$325\350 a head for 2.
1 Col romney ram lamb. $350\$400.
Call 604/462 9465
or email
joannasleigh@aol.com
HAY FOR SALE, ALFALFA AND ALFALFA
grass mix. Big and midsize squares. Call
250/567-3287.
DeBOER’S USED
TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT
GRINDROD, BC
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
JD 6400 MFWD w/ldr 29,500
JD 6400 mfwd cab sl ldr 49,000
JD 6410 mfwd cab sl ldr 54,000
JD 4240 cab 3pt hitch 18,500
JD 1120 dsl ldr rb canopy SOLD
JD 220 disk 19 ft W center fold 14,500
JD 220 disk 20 ft W center fold
new blades 16,500
JD 2130 diesel, 66 HP 10,500
IHC 12’ grain drill w/GSA SOLD
Kvernland 4X16 plow 3 pt 3,250
CASE 430 skid steer ldr, 2006, cab
& AC, 1050 hrs, premium unit 25,000
JD 1830 diesel, with loader 10,500
Ed DeBoer • 250/838-7362
cell 250/833-6699
Curt DeBoer • 250/838-9612
cell 250/804-6147
ALFALFA FOR SALE
3x4x8
Barn Stored
250/567-7714
Toll Free 1-888-357-0011
www.ultra-kelp.com
ULTRA-KELP
TM
Celebrating 30 Years
Serving Western Canadian Agriculture
Congratulations to:
ROMYN HILL FARM LTD
BRAD & JODI ROMYN • SORRENTO,B.C.
2014 TOP PRODUCTION HERD
BC HOLSTEIN
Flack’s Bakerview Kelp Products Inc
Pritchard, BC
CORN SILAGE FOR SALE
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
FOB CURTIS FARM, ARMSTRONG
PRICE DEPENDS ON VOLUME
PHONE TED 250/260-0009
OR PHONE TXT DAVID
250/308-8121
NEW
POLYETHYLENE
TANKS
of all shapes & sizes for septic and water
storage. Ideal for irrigation, hydroponics,
washdown, lazy wells, rain water, truck
box, fertizilizer mixing & spraying.
Call
1-800-661-4473
for closest distributor.
Web: [www.premierplastics.com]
Manufactured in Delta by
Premier Plastics Inc.
Quality Privacy
Cedar Hedging For Sale
Emerald, Excelsa
MENTION THIS AD &
RECEIVE 10%
OFF YOUR ORDER
FREE LOCAL DELIVERY ON
ORDERS OF 25 OR MORE CEDARS
• Discounts for large orders available
• We have all sizes 3’ +
Installation services available
Wholesale/Retail
604/217-2886
www.fraservalleycedars.com
FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE
NAME ____________________________________________
OLD ADDRESS ______________________________________
__________________________________________________
PHONE ____________________________________________
NEW ADDRESS ______________________________
__________________________________________________
PHONE ____________________________________________
COUNTRY
Life
in BC
Canada Post will not deliver your
Country Life in BC if they change
your postal code, your street name
and/or address. If your address
changes, please fill out the form
below and mail or fax it to us, or
use email.
Thank you!
1120 East 13th Ave
Vancouver, B.C. V5T 2M1
Email: countrylifeinbc@shaw.ca
Phone 604/871-0001 • Fax: 604/871-0003
Jan 16
CHANGE
OF
ADDRESS?
Lola!
Introducing Kubota’s All New M-6
Join the expanding Kubota
family and experience what
quality built and precision
made mean to your farm.
See your dealer for more
information on our new hay
tool line and be ‘Kubota ready’
this fall.
s .EWMOWERCONDITIONERS
s $OUBLEROTORRAKESANDTEDDERS
s !NDOURNEW"63#3UPER#UT
SILAGEBALERWITHTHREEVARIABLEBALEDENSITY
OPTIONS
kubota.ca
Jo
i
n the ex
p
and
i
n
g
Kubota
family and experience what
Limited time only.
See your dealer for details.
Pre-Sell
program in effect!
ABBOTSFORD AVENUE MACHINERY CORP. 1521 Sumas Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604/864-2665
COURTENAY NORTH ISLAND TRACTOR LTD. 3663 South Island Hwy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/334-0801
CRESTON KEMLEE EQUIPMENT LTD. N.W. Boulevard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/428-2254
DAWSON CREEK DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT 11508-8th Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/782-5281
DUNCAN ISLAND TRACTOR & SUPPLY LTD. 4650 Trans Canada Hwy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/746-1755
KAMLOOPS DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT 706 Carrier Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/851-2044
KELOWNA AVENUE MACHINERY CORP. 1090 Stevens Road Hwy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/769-8700
OLIVER GERARD’S EQUIPMENT LTD. 97 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/498-2524
PRINCE GEORGE HUBER EQUIPMENT Upper Mud River Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/560-5431
QUESNEL DOUGLAS LAKE EQUIPMENT Highway 97 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/991-0406
VERNON AVENUE MACHINERY CORP. 7155 Meadowlark Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250/545-3355
Country Life in BC • January 201640
spring.
See us at the
Pacific Ag Show
The all new
M7 tractor and
Kubota skid steers
will be unveiled at
Pacific Ag!